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(Gc 975.702 C38y 1391 
^! Year book (Charleston, S.C. ) 
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Charleston, S.C. 



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YEAR BOOK-18 9 1. 




CITY OF CHARLESTON, 



So. Ca. 






WALKER, EVANS & COGSWELL CO., PRINTERS, 
3 Broad Street, Charleston, S. C. 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



MAYOR AND ALDERMEN, 

Elected Dec'r. ISth, 1887. Inaugurated Dec'r, 19th, 188/ 



MAYOR. 
Hon. GEO. D BRYAN. 

MAYOR Pro Tem. 1891. 

DENNIS O'NEILL. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward i— JAS. F. REDDING, ANDREW SIMONDS, Jr. 
Ward 2—3. ADGER SMYTH, SAMUEL WEBB. 
Ward 3—Y. KRESSEL, Jr., THOMAS RODDY. 
Ward ^— F. J. McGAREY, J, F. LILIENTHAL. 
Ward 5— SAMUEL J. PREGNALL, M. A. CONNOR. 
Ward 6— A. F. C. CRAMER, DENNIS O'NEILL. 
Ward 7— JOHN FEEHAN, HENRY SCHACHTE. 
Ward S—R. C. BARKLEY, WILLIAM ROACH. 
Ward 9— A. JOHNSON, A. J. RILEY. 
Ward 10— J. P. COLLINS, JOHN M. SMITH. 
Ward 11— C. L. MEYER, W, K. DARBY. 
Ward 12- C. S. GADSDEN, H. L. CADE. 



iv City (jovernmicrd. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF CITY COUNCIL 

APPOINTED DECEMBER 19th, 1887. 



Ways and Means — J. Adger Smyth, Chairman ; C S. Gadsden, James 
F. Redding, A. F. C. Cramer, x\ndrew Simonds, Jr., W. K. Darby and 
the Mayor. 

Sewerage of City — R. C. Barkley, Chairman ; J. F. Lilieuthal, H. L. 
Cade, A. J. Riley, C. L. Meyer and the Mayor. 

Streets — C. S. Gadsden, Chairman ; A. Johnson, J. A. Smyth, S. J. 
Pregnal], Wm. Roach, J. M. Smith and the Mayor. 

Accounts— J a^uies F. Redding, Chairman ; W. K. Darby and the 
Mayor. 

Lighting the C%— Andrew Simonds, Jr., Chairman; J. A. Smyth, 
C. S. Gadsden, J. F. Lilienthal, M. A, Connor. 

Contracts — A. F. C. Cramer, Chairman ; H. L. Cade and the Mayor. 

Engrossed Bills — H. Bchachte, Chairman ; Dennis O'Neill, J. P. 
Collins. 

Fhe Escapes — A. J. Riley, Chairman ; R. C. Barkley, F. Kressel, Jr. 

Steam Engines — J. M. Smith, Chairman ; Samuel Webb, R. C. 
Barkley. 

Retrenchment and Relief Ssunuel Webb, Chairman ; H. Schachte, 
Wm. Roach. 

Railroads— M. A. Connor, Chairman ; R. C. Barkley, John Feehan. 

Tidal Brains — John Feehan, Chairman ; J. F. Lilienthal, A. J. 
Riley. 

Artesian Wells and Lot — J. P. Collins, Chairman ; F. Kressel, Jr., S. 
J. Pregnall. 

Wood and Brick Buildings— ¥. Kressel, Jr., Chairman ; A. Johnson, 
Samuel Webb. 

Journals a)id Vacant Offices— W. K Darby, Chairman ; C. L. Meyer, 
Thomas Roddy. 

Port and Harbor Improvements—'^. J. Pregnall, Chairman ; F. Kressel, 
Jr., J. F. Lilienthal. 

Wattr Supply — A. Johnson, Chairman ; C. S. Gadsden, Andrew 
Simonds, Jr. 

City Lands— T>Qnnm O'Neill, Chairman ; W. K. Darby, J. M. 
Smith. 

Printing— F.J. McGarey, Chairman ; Wm. Roach, John Feehan. 

City Hall, Clock and Chimes — Wm. Roach, Chairman ; Andrew 
Simonds, Jr., F. J. McGarey. 

Pleasure Grounds, Lower Wards— J. F. Lilienthal, Chairman ; R. C. 
Barkley, J. F. Redding, 



City Government. V 

Pleasure Grounds, Upper Wards — H. L. Cade, Chairman ; Samuel 
Webb, C. L. Meyer. 

Public Buildings — Thomas Roddy, Chairman ; H. L. Cade, H. 
Schachte. 

Fire Loan Bonds — C. L. Meyer, Chairman ; F. J. McGarey and the 
Mayor. 



CLERK OF. COUNCIL. 

W. W SIMONS. 



MESSENGER OF COUNCIL. 

ROBERT G. O'NEALE. 



CITY COURT. 

Recorder. — Wm. Alston Pringle. 
Corporation Counsel. — Charles Inglesby. 
Sheriff. — Glenn E. Davis. 
Clerk. — F. J. Devereux. 



BOARD OF EQUALIZATION. 

J. Adger Smyth, C- S. Gadsden, James F. Redding, A. F- C.Cramer, 
Andrew Simonds, Jr., W. K. Darby. 



CITY OFFICERS. 

Treasurer — W. L. Campbell. 

Assessor. — W, Aiken Kelly. 

Superintendent of Streets. — T. A. Huguenin. 

City Civil Engineer. — L. J. Barbot. 

Tidal Drain Keeper.— M. Hogan. 

Gaugers of Liquor. — C. L. DuBose. 

Flour Inspector- 
Inspectors arid Surveyors of Timber — S, P. Bennett, C. S. Jenkins, 
Patrick Devereux, 

Chimney Contractors — Wards 1 and 2, P. M. Sheridan ; Wards 3 
and 4, Wm. Shelton : Wards 5 and 6, Daniel Lanigan ; Wards 7 and 
8, W. Y. Lovett ; Wards 9 and 10, John Noland ; Wards 11 and 12, 
J. W. A. Meyer. 



vi City Government. 

POLICE. 

Chief. — Joseph Golden. 

First Lieutenant. — F. J. Heidt. 

Second Lieutenant. — E. A. Mollenhauer. 

TJiird Lieutenant.— J. H. Fordham. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

J. L. Tobias, Chairman ; Middleton Michel, M. D.; Allard Mem- 
minger, M. D.; G E. Manigault, M. D.; C. P. Aimar, R. M. Marshall 
M. A. Connor, A. Sidney Smith, Hall T. McGee, T. R. McGahau, 
W. P. Carrington. 

City Registrar and Secretary of the Board — H. B, Horlbeck, M. D. 

Clerk. — Henry F. Faber. 

Sanitary Inspectors. — District No. 1, M. Bolger ; District No. 2, 
J. P. O'Neill ; District No. 3, A. A. Barbot ; District No. 4, E. S. 
Mikell. 

Health Detective. — F. Nipson. 

City Dispensary Physicians. — District No. 1, Lane Mullally, M. D.; 
District No, 2, Jos. Maybank, M. D.; District No. 3, Wm. Taylor 
Edmonds, M. D.; District No. 4, Wm. B. Ryan, M. D. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Board of Fire Masters. — F. S. Rodgers, Chairman ; G. H. Walter, 
E. F. Sweegan, A. Stemmermann, R. C. Barkley, C. R. Valk and 
the Mayor. 

Chief'— F. L. O'Neill. 

First Assistant Chief. — W. H. Smith. 

Second Assistant Chief.— T. S. Sigwald. 

Clerk.— B. M. Strobel. 



COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON. 

Trustees — The Mayor and City Recorder are ex-officio members of 
the Board ; Hon. G. S. Bryan, Alderman C. S. Gadsden and Mr. S. 
Y. Tapper, with the ex-officio members, represent the City in the 
Board. The remaining members of the board are : Messrs- Ch. 
Richardson Miles, President of the Board ; Rudolph Siegling, Vice- 
President ; H. A M. Smith, G. W. Dingle, J. F. Ficken, G. Lamb 
Buist, Rev. C. C. Pinckney, D, D., and C. H. Simonton. 

Secretary and Treasurer — ^^Jacob Williman. 



HIGH SCHOOL OF CHARLESTON- 

Trustees. — Julian Mitchell, President ; Rev. C. C. Pinckney, D. D.; 
C. R. Miles, J. A. Smyth, James F. Redding, A. B. Rose, J. P. K. 
Bryan, Dr. H. Baer, T. P. Lowndes, Hon- Wm. A^ Courtenay and 
the Mayor ex-officio. 

Secretary.— B,. G. O'Neale. 



City Go'vernraent. vii 



DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES, 

WM. ENSTON HOME. 

Trustees of the Fund for Surviving Annuities — Hon. Wm. A. Courte- 
nay, Cbairman ; J. F. Ficken, W. Enston Butler. 

Trustees of the Home — Hon. Wm. A. Courtenay, President ; Alva 
Gage, Vice President; W. G. Muckenfuss, E. H. Jackson, G. W. Wil- 
liams, Jr., W. E. Butler, A . B. Rose, Chas. E. Valk, C. P. Aimar, J. P. 
K. Ryan, W. J- Miller, W. E. Huger, and the Mayor ex-officio. 

Secretary — M. B. Paine. 



ORPHAN HOUSE. 

Commissioners — Jacob Small, Chirman ; F, J. Pelzer, Dr. B. A. 
Muckenfuss, Geo. W. Williams, C. A. Chisolm, E. F. Sweegan, H. H. 
DeLeon, Theo. D. Jervey, A. T. Smythe, Andrew Simonds, A. F. C. 
Cramer, E. Willis. 

Principal of Orphan i/ouse— Miss A. K. Irving. 

Tmc/j^rs— Miss N. L. LeQueux, Mrs. A. L. Reilly, Miss C Arnold, 
Miss M. E. Hamlin, Miss M. McNeil. 

Kindergarten— ^1\&& E. King. 

Seu-ing Department — Mrs. Mary Manno, Miss A. V. Webb. 

Matrons — Mrs. F. Perry, Mrs. M. D. Shaw and Miss A. C. Cordes. 

Acting Matrons — Mrs. D. Lucas, Miss A. E. Terrell. 

Engineer — IST- L. Barton. 

Secretary of the Board and Treasurer of Commissioners^ Trust Fund — 
E. Montague Grimke- 



CITY HOSPITAL. 

Commissioners — Dr. R. A. Kinlocb, Dr. Manning Simons, F. Kressel, 
Ji., Wm. Roach, E. Willis, D. A. J. Sullivan, K. S. Tupper, D. O'Neill, 
E. R. White, Dr. R. B. Rhett, I. P. O'Neill, J. L. Weber. 

Superintendent — D. M. Burns, 



ALMSHOUSE. 

Commissioners— E. S. Burnham, Chairman ; Hermann Klatte, Vice 
Chairman; H. A. Moloney, Secretary and Treasurer; A. Johnson^ 
A. H. Murray, F. Von Santen, Chas. S. Schmonsees, C. Wulbern, 
Morris Harris, D. A. J. Sullivan, John Feehan. J. F. Lilienthal, E. R. 
White. 

Master — H, G. Frazer. 

Matron— Mrs. E M. Frazer. 

Clerk— M. B. Ryan. 



viii City Government 

ASHLEY RIVER ASYLUM. 

Commissioners of Public Lands. 

R. C. Barkley, Chairman ; W. J. Parker < Vice-Chairman ; T. F„ 
McGarey, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Thomas Roddy, F. W. Scblepegrell, C. B. Nell, S. J. Pregnall, A. J. 
Riley, Jerry O'Brien, Jason Brown, H. L. Williams, W. G. Barron, 

Steward Ashley Biver Asylum — Thomas M. Holmes. 
Matron Ashley River Asylum. — Mrs. Adeline Holmes. 
Grave Digger Public Cemetery — Michael Morse. 



MARKETS AND GREEN GROCERIES. 

Comynissioners of the Markets— J SLxnes McAllister, Chairman ; M. 
A.Connor, F. Horris, T, F. McGarey, A. F, C. Cramer, Frank Kressel, 
Jr., S. J. Pregnall, C. E. Bart, J. P. Collins, G. C. Schmetzer, Wm. 
Heffron, John Boyd, J. R. P. Ravenel, J. C. H. Claussen, W. H. 
Dunkin. 

Chief Clerk— T. B. McSweeney. 

Assistant Clerk Lower Market — Oscar Prause. 

Assistant Clerk Upper Market — L. F. Murphy. 

Clerk of Weights and Measures — Clarence Wagner. 



MARION SQUARE. 

Commissioners — Col. A. Coward, Chairman; Maj. B. H, Rutledge, 
Gen. R. Siegling, Maj. G. B. Edwards, Gen. T. A. Huguenin, Capt. 
Alex. W. Marshall, Lt. Col. A. G. Magrath, Jr. 



COLONIAL COMMON AND ASHLEY RIVER 

ASYLUM. 

Commissioners— Cs^^^QY A. Chisolm, Chairman ; S. S. Buist, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer ; A. B. Rose, F. E Taylor, J. F. Ficken, C U. 
Shepard, Jr., C. R. Miles, Eugene P. Jervey, A. DeCaradeuc, Lanier 
Eason and the Mayor. 



BATHING HOUSES. 

Commisszoners— Dennis O'Neill, Chairman ; Andrew Simonds, Jr., 
Saml. Webb M. A. Connor, Wm. Roach, C. L. Meyer, H. L. Cade. 



INDEX. 



Page 
Treasury Department — 

Treasury Department 3 

Report of City Assessor 20 

Report of City Sheriff. 30 

Report of Corporation Counsel 32 

Report of Street Department.... 35 

Department of Health 40 

Tidal Drain Keeper 82 

Departments of Charities — 

Orphan House 83 

Shirras Dispensary 93 

City Hospital 95 

Alms House 98 

William Enston Home 101 

Department of Police— 

Report of Fire Department 105 

Report of Police Department 110 

Pleasure Grounds — 

Marion Square.. 119 

Colonial Common 120 

Upper Wards Pleasure Grounds 120 

Public Markets 121 

Port of Charleston ....122 

Education in Charleston— 

Superintendent Archer's Report 125 

The High School of Charleston 128 

The College of Charleston 133 

Ordinances Ratified 1891 136 

Acts of Legislature 138 



APPKNOIX. 



Address delivered by Hon. Chas. H. Simonton on the unveiling of 
the W. L. I. Monument, July 21st, 1891, in Washington 
Square 143 



Ilafloif Biijan'? J^nnual I(evieW. 



CITY OF CHARLESTON, 
Executive Department, 

January, 1892. 

To the City Council of Charleston : 

The Ordinances of the City require that the outgoing 
Mayor shall present to the City Council the reports of the 
various officers of the City for the current year. 

It gives me pleasure to say that all of the Departments 
have maintained their high standard, being presided over 
by officers of long standing in the service, experience, 
ability and honesty. It is greatly to be desired that what 
has now become an unwritten law, to wit : the retention in 
office of capable public servants, will not be departed from 
in the future. 

From the Treasurer's report it appears that all of our 
expenditures have been promptly met — the deficit of the 
previous year (1890) resulting from the opening of Concord 
street, has been made up, and there remains in the Treasury 
a surplus of ten thousand eight hundred and seventy- 
seven yW dollars, after all appropriations have been pro- 
vided for. 

The payment of the bonds which became due in October, 



2 ' Mayor Bryants Amiual Review. 

amounting to nineteen thousand two hundred dollars, 
has been provided for; the schedule printed herewith 
shows those of them which have been paid. 

It cannot be amiss to put on record here my deep sense 
of gratitude to the members of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee (Messrs. J. Adger Smyth, C. S. Gadsden, James F. 
Redding, A. F. C. Cramer, Andrew Simonds and W. K. 
Darby), for their able and wise administration of the 
finances of the City during the past four years ; their ever 
watchful care has made this part of my labors, as Mayor, 
an easy burden. 



Financial Department. 



Ledger Balances 

December 31st, 1891 
Dr. Cr. 


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Financial Department. 
Licenses Issued at City Treasury, 1891 



BUSINESS. 



@ 



Amount. 



.Total. 



CLASS 1. 

Agencies or Companies each — 
Academy of Music, Theatre or Opera 

House 

Bagging Manufacturing Companies 

Banks, State or Savings 

Breweries ,,„. 

Building and Loan Associations 

Cotton Manufacturing Companies 

Express Companies or Agencies 

Electric Light Companies 

Fertilizer Companies or Agencies 

Forwarding Agencies or Companies 

Gas Companies 

Insurance Companies or Agencies 

whose Business is less than $1,000. 
For each additional 1000 or fractional 

part $1,000 of business, at $10; 12 at 
. 130; 12 at $40, 6 at $50, 8 at $60, 1 at 

$70; 3 at $80, 2 at $100, 1 at $110, 1 at 

$130; 1 at $200, 1 at $270, 1 at $610 

Mercantile— Dun, Bradstreet 

Phosphate Rock Mining or Manufac- 
turing Companies or Agencies... 

Railroad Companies 

Railroad Ticket Agencies, being all 

persons buying or selling Railroad 

Tickets other than authorized 

Agents of Railroad Companies...... 

Real Estate Agencies or Collectors of 

Rents or other claims , 

Steamship, (regular lines) Agencies or 

Companies 

Steam Ferry Boat Agencies or Com 

panics... 

Steam Cotton Press where one is lo 

cated and worked 

Steam Cotton Press where more than 

one is located and worked 

Steamboat Companies or Agencies for 

each Steamboat 

Steam Tug Companies or Agencies for 

each Tug 

Sailing Vessel Companies or Agencies.. 

Street Railway Companies 

Telephone Companies or Agencies 

Terminal Warehouse Companies or 

Agencies 

Water Works Companies 

Oil, Creosote or Fernoline Companies.. 
Kerosene Oil Companies or Agencies... 



$200 
500 
250 
100 

25 
500 
500 
500 
500 

25 
500 

20 



150 

500 
500 



100 

50 

250 

100 

200 

300 

50 

25 

50 

500 

500 

500 

iOO 

50 

500 



400 
500 

2,500 
100 
300 
500 
500 
500 

2,500 

25 

500 

600 



3,450 
450 

2,000 
2,000 



200 

150 

250 

100 

400 

300 

150 

100 

100 

1,000 

500 

500 

100 

50 

500 



$21,225 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



Licenses Issued iSqi- — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 






Amount. 



Total. 



CLASS 2. 

Auctioneers, real estate brokers, brok 
ers of stocks, bonds and other per 
son al property at auction or private 
sale, each 

Auctioneers and real estate brokers... 



CLASS 3. 
Artists, ambrotypists, daguerrean or 
photographists 



CLASS 5. 

Brokers, ship 

CLASS 6. 
Bankers, who are all persons or firms, 
other than banks, buying and sell- 
ing domestic or foreign exchange, 
or discounting notes or other evi- 
dences of debt 



CLASS 7. 
Billiard or pool tables, for each table... 

CLASS 8. 

Boarding Houses and Hotels. 

Other that sailor, having less than 10 

rooms 

Other than sailor, having 20 and less 

than 50 rooms 

Those having over 100 rooms. 

CLASS 9. 

Bakeries, steam 

Bakeries, other than steam 



CLASS 10. 
Barbers, for each chair.... 



CLASS 11. 
Bill posters and distributors. 

CLASS 12. 
Butchers, for each stall 



CLASS 13. 

Builders, Master Mechanics and Work- 
m.en of all trades and employ- 
ments not specially named else- 
where. 

Those employing not over ten hands 

Engravers 



CLASS 14. 
Cotton presses, worked by hand. 



100 

75 



25 
50 

150 
25 

10 

50 
100 

60 

25 

2 50 

40 
5 



35 



200 
750 



100 

50 
100 



60 
650 



125 

20 



950 
125 

150 

600 
50 



250 
710 

197 50 

80 

140 



145 
35 



Financial Department 9 

Licenses Issued at City Treasury, i8qi— Continuee. 



BUSINESS. 



.o 

o 



Amount. 



Total. 



CLASS 15. 
Dime shows, per day 

CLASS 16. 
Cook shops 

CLASS 18. 
Dentists 

CLASS 19. 
Dye houses..., 

CLASS 20. 

Dealers, who are all persons, firmjj or 
companies, buying or selling any 
article of trade or merchandise : 

Dealers in meats, (sold elsewhere than 
in market), or green grocer on pro- 
duction of receipt for 1 year's rent 
of stall in the market, in advance.. 

CLASS 21. 
Dealers in Upland Cotton or Rice in 

tierces, or its equivalent in barrels: 
Those buying or selling less than 5,000 

packages 

Those buying or selling 5,000 packages 

or less than 8,000 packages 

Those buying or selling 8,000 packages 

and less than 15,000 packages 

Those buying or selling 20,000 packages 

and less than 30,000 packages 

Those buying or selling 30,000 packages 

or more 

CLASS 22. 
Dealers in Sea Island Cotton or Long 

Staple Cotton: 
Those buying or selling less than 1,000 

packages 

Those buying or selling 1,000 packages 

and less than 2,500 packages 

CLASS 23. 
Dealers in Sewing Machines 

CLASS 24. 
Importers and Dealers in Fertilizers, 
Cotton Seed Meal, Kainit, Guano 
Phosphate Rock, Marl, Lime and 
all or any other like articles, used 
or sold as fertilizers, or which are 
used for manufacturing fertilizers: 



11 



150 



100 
200 
300 
400 
■500 



50 
100 

50 



150 

150 

150 

30 



1650 



2000 

1000 

1200 

800 

500 



450 
300 



5500 



750 
100 



10 Mayor Bryan's Annual Revieiv. 

Licenses Issued at City Treasury, i8qi— Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



^^ 
.o 

o 



@ 



Amount. 



Total. 



Those selling not over 1,000 tons. 
Those selling over 5,000 tons 



Dealers in Liquor, Wholesale and Re- 
tail: 

Retail Liquor or Bar Rooms 

Those whose sales do not exceed 20.000. 
Bottlers of beer and ale, or agencies 



CLASS 26. 
Dealers in books and pictures on streets 
or canvassers for same 



CLASS 27. 
Dealers in horses or mules. 



CLASS 28. 
Dealers whose stock never exceeds in 
value the sum of $100 



CLASS 29. 
Dealers in Naval Stores: 
Those buying or selling not over |15,000 
packages 



263 

12 

3 



161 



CLASS 30. 

Dealers in hides and tallow, furs and 
wool 

Dealers in ice, oil coal, etc., from carts 
or wagons on streets, for each cart 
or wagon, exclusive of cart licp'nse 

Dealers in ice from branch ice house.. 

Dealers in ice or ice house 

Dealers in ice cream or ice cream sa- 
loons 

Dealers in junk, retail 

Dealers peddling goods around the city 
per week 

Dealers in Soda Water, sold from founts, 
and Milk Shakes 

Dealers in Poultry, Vegetables or Fruit 
on street, per month 

Dealers in Poultry, Fish, Vegetables, 
Fruit in Market 

Dealers, Retail, in Second-hand Cloth- 
ing only 



CLASS 31. 
Dealers in Coal, or Coal Yards, and all 
Importers of Coal, (except such as 
is imported directly by officials of 



66 



11 



50 
500 



100 

150 

50 



100 



100 
600 



26,300 

1800 

150 



600 

28250 

60 

350 

805 
700 



50 


50 


10 

10 

100 


80 

50 

200 


15 
30 


45 
180 


5 


330 


10 


80 


2 


4 


5 


55 


35 


70 







1,144 



Finandal Department. 11 

Licenses Issued at City Treasury, 1891 — Continued. 



BUSINESS, 




@ 


Amount. 


Total. 


mechanical, manufacturing or in- 
dustrial enterprises for use of such 
establishments,) and all persons 
selling Coal from wharves or ves- 
sels, shall be deemed liable to a 
Coal Yard License 


5 

7 

282 
145 
52 
22 
11 
18 
15 


50 
50 

15 
25 

30 
40 
50 

60 

80 

5 

75 


250 
350 




Dealers, Commercial Brokers, who sell 
only on brokerage or on commis- 
sion here, each broker or recog- 
nized firm of brokers, not exceed- 
inar two members 


600 






CLASS 32. 
Dealers in Poultry and Country Pro- 
duce, and in any and every other 
article of trade or merchandise 
not specially named elsewhere in 
this Ordinance, whose annual sales 
do not exceed |2,000 


4,230 
3,625 
1,560 
880 
550 
1,080 
1,200 

4,858 




Those whose annual sales are over 
$2,000 and less than $5 000 




Those whose annual sales are over 
15,000 and less than $10,000 




Those whole annual sales are over 
$10,000 and less than $15,000 




Those whose annual sales are over 
$15,000 and less than $20 000 




Those whose annual sales are over 
$20 000 and less than $30 000 




Those whose annual sales are over 
$30 000 and less than $50,000 




Those whose annual sales exceed $50,000 
for each additional $1,000—1 at S90, 
2 at $95, 10 at $100, 1 at $110, 1 
at $120, 1 at $125, 2 at $130, 1 
at $150, 1 at $133, 1 at $190, 1 at 
$195, 1 at $200, ] at $205, 1 at 
$230, 2 at $330, 2 at $500 


17,983 




164 
1 




CLASS 33. 
Fairs, Promenade Concerts, Parties, 
Public Balls, Glass Blowing,Operas, 
Minstrels, Panoramas, and every 
other kind of public entertainment 
of a like nature, per day or night.. 




820 


CLASS 34. ■ 
Founderies and Machine Shops, whose 
gross business does not exceed $75,000 


75 





12 



Mayor Bryants Annual Revieiu. 
Licenses Issued 1891 — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 









^^ 


(^. 


Amount. 


o 






o 






!zi 






2 

2 


$150 
50 


$300 


100 


1 


50 


50 


4 


10 


40 


4 


15 


60 


1 


10 


.10 


1 


15 


15 


3 


15 


45 


4 


15 


60 


1 


15 


16 


1 


15 


15 


4 


40 


160 


1 


15 


15 


4 

8 


25 

25 


100 




2 


50 


100 


7 
1 


25 
60 


175 




37 


10 


370 


25 


25 


625 


36 


50 


800 


1 


75 


75 


1 
1 

1 


100 
20 
50 


100 




50 



Totals. 



Those whose gross business exceeds 

$100,000 

CLASS 35. 

Bag (other than paper) Factories 

Barrel Factories 

Cigar Factories 

Candy Factories 

Cotton Tie Buckle Factories 

Clothing factories 

Harness factories 

Mattress factories 

Shirts and other underwear factories 

Sausage (by steam) factories 

Sash and blind factories.... 

Soap and candle factories 

Soda water factories and bottlers of 
soda water 

CLASS 36. 
Gasfitters and plumbers 

CLASS 38. 

Laundries, steam , 

Laundries, washing and ironing houses 

CLASS 39. 
Lumber yards, lumber ponds • 

CLASS 40. 

Lawyers, Physicians, Chemists: 

Whose gross business does not exceed 
$600: 

Sixteen Lawyers— Twenty-One Physi- 
cians— Chemists 

Whose gross business does not exceed 
$1,000 : 

Thirteen Lawyers— Twelve Physicians 

Whose gross business does not exceed 
$3,000 : 

Eleven Lawyers— Five Physicians 

Whose gross business does not exceed 
$5,000 : 

One Physician 

Whose gross business exceeds $5,000 : 

One Chemist , 

CLASS 41. 
Marble yards 

CLASS 42. 
Mills, flour 



375 



200 



275 



60 



1970 
20 



Financial Department 
LiCEJ^SEs Issued 189J — Continued. 



13 



BUSINESS. 



Amount. 



Total. 



Mills, grits, steam 

Mills, grits, horsepower 

Mills, planing 

Mills, saw 

Mills, rice, those doing a business of 
10,000 tierces and under 

Mills, spice or coffee, sea foam, self-rais 
ing or prepared flour as special bus 
iness 



CLASS 43. 

Papers, daily, worked by steam, gas or 
water power 

Papers worked by hand 

Printing offices, job, steam, gas or wa- 
ter power 

Printing offices, job, hand ^ 



Restaurants. 



CLASS 44. 



CLASS 45. 
Shooting galleries, skating rinks. 

CLASS 46. 
Stables, public or livery 



CLASS 47. 
Stevedores 

CLASS 48. 

Tailor, Merchant 

Tailor Shops, not merchants. 



CLASS 49. 
Undertakers, whose business does not 

exceed $1,000 
Undertakers, whose business does not 

exceed $2,000 



CLASS 52. 

Warehousemen and Wharfmen who 
are all persons, firms or Companies 
receiving any article of trade or 
Merchandise on Storage, either 
on Wharves, Wharf Warehouses, 
Buildings or Stores in any part of 
the City, or who have piers or 
wharves used for landing or ship- 
ping of goods from vessels. 

Whose Gross Receipts do not exceed 
$5,000 



30 
10 
50 
50 

250 



20 



150 

25 

50 
15 



75 



120 

20 

150 

100 

750 



40 



300 
25 

150 

15 



150 
40 



175 
100 



225 



1230 



490 

150 

50 

60 

50 

190 

275 



14 



Mayor Bryants Annual Bevieiu, 
Licenses Issued 1891 — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 


a 

CD 


@ 


Amount. 


Total. 


Whose Gross Receipts do not exceed 
110 000 


3 

8 

1 

19 

1 

2 

16 

1094 

44 

6 

2 

29 


1100 

10 

5 
10 

5 

25 

30 

10 

20 
30 
10 
20 


$ 300 






1 525 


CLASS 53. 
Wheelwright and Blacksmith Shops- 
Wheelwright one forge 


80 

5 
190 

5 

50 


Wheelwright Shops, for each ad- 
ditional forge 




Blacksmith Shops one forge 




Blacksmith Shops, for each ad- 
ditional forge 




Coach, Carriage and Buggy Makers 
and Repairing 






330 
480 


CLASS 54. 
Wood Yards— All parties having paid 
for Wood Yard License, and Li- 
cense for Carts, shall have the privi- 
lege of offering wood for sale on the 
streets without the addition of a 
Huckster's License, provided how- 
ever the names of the owners of 
such carts be painted thereon 




Specials 


10,940 

880 

180 

20 

580 


205 


Total Classified License 


92,069.50 


CLASS 55. 
Vehicles, Carts used for business pur- 
poses, including farm and phos- 
phate carts, trucks or wagons, 
drays, hacks. 

Drawn by one horse 




Drawn by two horse 




Coaches, Omnibuses, by two horses 

Buggies and Carriages by one horse 

Buggies and Carriages by two horses... 

Total Classified and Carts 


12,600 
104,669.50 



Financial Department. 15 

Cash Transactions of the Commissioners Sinking Fund 
Forfeited Lands January 1st, 1891 to December 
12th, 1891. 

RECEIPTS. 

To Balance from last Annual Statement |266 48 

Arrears State Taxes I 76 73 

State Taxes 1881-1890 180 94 

City Taxes 398 98 

Commissioners Public Schools 2 50 

Penalties 5 18 

Expense Account 27 74 

Bond Account 203 50 

Interest Account 31 50 

Kents 27 00 

Corporation Counsel 5 00 

Profit on Settlement 66 51 

$1,025 58 

S!l,292 06 

expenditures. 

By State Taxes 1889-90 1309 97 

Commissioners Sinking Fund, amount paid over 
to that Fund ^^ 700 

Balance 282 09 

$1,292 06 

assests. 

Personal Bonds 9B211 50 

January 1, 1891, there were on hand 43 pieces of 

property assessed @ $ 26,175 

Settled during the year 1891, 5 pieces as- 

a), 2,800 



Leaving unsettled December 12th, 1891, 38 

pieces assessed @.... 23,375 00 

Cash ..- 282 09 

Respectfully submitted. ^ 

^ -^ WM. L. CAMPBELL, 



December 12th, 1891. City Treasurer. 

Examined and found correct. 

G. D. BRYAN, J. ADGER SMYTH, 

Mayor. Chairman Committee Ways and Means. 



16 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Cash Transactions of the Orphan House Fund from 
January 1st, 1891, to December 31st, 1891. 

RECEIPTS. 

To Balance from, last Statement I 42 91 

To Interest Account— 
12 months' interest on $176,800 Four per Cent. 

Bonds $7,072 00 

12 months' interest on $31,870 47 State Consols. 1,912 24 

. 8,984 24 



$9,027 15 

expenditures. 

By Amount paid over to City.... $8,984 24 

Balance 42 91 



$9,027 15 
ASSETS. 

Cash $ 42 91 

Four per Cent. Bonds City of Charleston 176,800 00 

State South Carolina Consols 31,870 47 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM L. CAMPBELL, 

City Treasurer. 
Examined and found correct. 

JACOB SMALL, 

Chairman Coinmr's Orphan House and Trustee Orphan House 
Fund, 



Financial Department. 17 



Cash Transactions City College Fund from January ist 
1 89 1, TO December 3 ist, 1891. 



RECEIPTS. 

To Interest Account — 

12 months' Interest on $23,000 Five per cent. 

Stock $1,150 00 

12 months' Interest on $75,500 Four per cent. 

Bonds 3,020 00 

$4,170 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

By Jacob Will iman, Treasurer $3,922 00 

Balance 248 00 

$4,170 00 

ASSETS. 

Four per cent. Bonds City of Charleston $75,500 00 

Five per cent. Stock City of Charleston 23,000 00 

Cash 248 00 

Respectfully submitted. 

WM. L CAMPBELL, 

City Treasurer. 

Examined and found correct. 

CH. RICHARDSON MILES, 

President Board of Trustees College of Charleston 



18 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Cash Transactions of the Commissioners Sinking Fund 
FROM January 1st, 1891, to December 12th, 1891. 

RECEIPTS. 

To Balance from last Annual Statement $ 880 30 

Sinking Fund Account (Forfeited Lands) 700 00 

$1,580 30 

EXPENDITURES. 

By Bond Account— 

$1,500 Seven per Cent. Bonds $1,500 00 

Balance 80 80 

$1,580 30 

STATEMENT. 

Seven per Cent. Bonds purchased during year 1891..|1,500 00 
Cancelled Seven per Cent- Bonds 1,500 00 

Cash— This Fund had January 1st 1891 880 30 

Received from all sources 700 00 

$1,580 30 

Expended for all purposes 1,500 00 

Balance $ 80 30 

assets. 
Cash $ 80 30 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. L. CAMPBELL, 

December 12th, 1891. City Treasurer. 

Examined and found correct. 
G, D. BRYAN, J. ADGER SMYTH, 

Mayor. Chairman Committee Ways and Mea7ts. 



Financia I Departraent. 



19 



Schedule of 7 per cent. Bonds and 6 per cent. Bonds, 
paid at the clty treasury, in 1 89 1 and cancelled ; 

also, 7 per cent. bonds due october i, 1895, pur- 
CHASED BY Com. S Fund and cancelled. 



Bonds due October 1, 1890 : 

141 $500 

112 500 

228 100 

250 100 

251 100 

* $1,300 



Bonds due October 1, 1891 : 
Xo. 

261 $500 

262 500 

263 500 

264 500 

265 500 

266 500 

267 500 

268 500 

269. .500 

270 .500 

271 .500 

272 .500 

273 500 

274 .500 

275 .500 

276 .500 

277 500 

278 .500 

279 500 

280 500 

281 .500 

282 .500 



No. 

283 $.500 

284 500 

285 500 

286 500- 

287 500 

288., 500 

289 500 

290 500 

291 500 

293 500 

294 500 

295 500 

461 100 

465 100 

466 100 

467 100 

468 100 

470 100 

471 100 

472 100 

473 100 

474 100 

478 100 

479 100 

480 100 

$18,-300 

119,600 

Old 6 per cent, bond, issue^ 

of October, 1853, No. 555. 1,000 

Total $20,600 



^Provided for in past years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. L. CAMPBELL, City Treasurer. 

Seven per cent, bonds due October 1, 1895, purchased by Com- 
missioners ."^inking Fund, cancelled: 

157 500 

158 500 

159 500 

11,500 



20 Mayor Bryants Annual Eevieiu. 



CITY ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



An examination of this report reveals the fact that the 
values of personal property for taxation have again 
decreased. The report is full of statistical information. 



Assessor's Office, City Hall, \ 
Charleston, S, C, December 31st, 1891. J 

To the Honorable- the Mayor and City Council 

of Charleston, S. C : 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit my Annual 
Report of this Department for the fiscal year ending 
December 31st, 1891. 

The assessed value of Real and Personal Property re- 
turned for taxation is as follows : 

Real Estate $14,878,430 

Personal Property 6,554,601 

Total $21,433,031 -@ 22 Mills...$471,526 68 



As compared with assessments for year 1890, the follow- 
ing differences are shown : 

Real Estate Increase $78,430 

Personal Property Decrease 31,938 

Total increase for 1891 $46,492 

The returns of Real Estate for the past four years, as 
compared with year 1887, shows an increase of $657,140, 
while the returns of Personal Property for same period 
show a decrease of $736,311, making a total decrease of 
the taxable basis for year 1891, as compared with year 
1887, 179,171. 



Financial Department 21 

The number of permits issued during the past year for 
the erection of new buildings, and old buildings improved, 
are as follows : 

165 New Buildings Reported Cost $402,850 

114 Old Buildings Improved Reported Cost 69,635 



Total 279 permits Reported Cost $472,485 

A detailed statement, showing the number of permits 
issued in the different Wards, is attached to this Report, to 
which I refer. 

The record of tlie sales of Real Estate kept during the 
past year continues to show an advance over assessments 
in all the wards of the city. 

392 pieces, assessed for $605,900, sold for |880,218, an 
advance over assessments of 45.28 per cent. 

I have prepared a statement, showing the comparison of 
assessments with sales in the different Wards, and the gene- 
ral average in the city, which is also appended to this 
Report. 

In addition to the usual statements furnished with my 
Annual Reports, I have also prepared recapitulated state- 
ments for the period covering the past administration, 
1888 to 1891, as a matter of comparison. 

Accompanying this Report, I beg leave to hand the fol- 
lowing annexed statements, which will furnish statistical 
information of interest to your honorable body and all 
corporators, to which I respectfully invite your attention. 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

Cit^ Assessor, 



22 Mayor BrycDis Annual Revieiv. 

A. 

Statement of the Description and Value of Per- 
sonal Property Returned for Taxation for 
Year 1891 • 



1478 Horses and Mules $ 112,225 

280 Cows 7;095 

963 Gold and Silver Watches and Plate 69,841 

496 Piano Fortes, Melodeons and Cabinet Organs 40,930 

470 Carriages, Buggies, &c 36.960 

1026 Wagons, Drays, Carts, &c , 38,445 

661 Dogs 6,785 

Merchandise, Money and Credits pertaining to busi- 
ness of Merchants 1,781,126 

Materials, Machinery, Engines, Tools and Fixtures of 

Manufacturers ...., 889,633 

Moneys, Bank Bills and Circulating Notes on hand or 

deposit and all Credits 362,348 

Receipts of Insurance Agencies 362,478 

Receipts of Express, Telegraph and Telephone Com- 
panies 23,101 

Capital Stocks of Banks 1,239,900 

Stocks of Phosphate Companies 70,275 

Stocks and Bonds of all other Companies, Corpora- 
tions and persons 973,074 

Vessels, Boats and other Floating Property 128,325 

All other Property, including Household Furniture... 412,060 



Total value of Personal Property $6,554,601 

VVM. AIKEN KELLY. 

City Assessor. 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891. 



Financial Department. 28 

B. 

Statement of the Returns of Real and Personal 
Property Assessed for City Taxes for Years 
1887, 1888, 1889, 1890 AND 1891. 



J887. 

Real Estate 114,221,290 

Personal Property 7,290,912 



Total Real and Personal $21,512,202 -@ 2 %— $430,244,04 



1888. 

Real Estate $14,527,350 

Personal Property 7,012,205 



Total Real and Personal.. ..$21,569,555—© 23| Mills— $506,884.54 



As compared with assessments for 1887. 

Gain on Real Estate $306,060— 

Decrease on Personal Property 248,707 — 



Total gain for 1888, as compared with 1887 $57,353 



1889. 

Real Estate $14,726,565 

Personal Property 6,699,087 



Total Real and Personal $21,425,652— @ 23 Mills— $492,790.00 



As compared with Assessments for 1888. 

Gain on Real Estate is $199,215— 

Decrease on Personal Property is 343,118-' 



Total Decrease for 1889 as compared with 1888... $143,903 



Total Decrease for 1889, as compared with 1887... $ 86,550 



24 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

1890. 

Real Estate $14,800,000 

Personal Property 6,586,539 



Total Real and Personal $21,386,539— @ 23 Mills— $491,890.40 



As compared with Assessments for 1889. 

Gain on Real Estate is I 73 435 oo 

Decrease on Personal Property is 112 548 00 



Total Decrease for 1890, as compared with 1889 $ 39,113.00 

Total Decrease for 1890, as compared with 1887 .$125,663.00 



1891. 

Real Estate $14,878,430 

Personal Property 6,554,601 



Total Real and Personal $21,433,031— @ 22 Mills— $471,526.68 



As compared with Assessments for 1890. 

Gain on Real Estate is $78,430— 

Decrease on Personal Property is 31,938— 

Total gain for 1891, as compared with 1890 $46,492.00 



Total Decrease for 1891, as compared with 1887... $79,171 00 



Total gain on Real Estate 1888 to 1891 $657,14000 



Total Decrease on Personal Property 1888 to 1891 $736,311*00 



WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

City Assessor. 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891, 



Financial Department. 
C. 



25 



Statement of the Number of Permits Issued for the 
Erection of New Buildings and Old Buildings Im- 
proved, FOR Year 1891, 

NEW BUILDINGS. 
165 Permits— Reported Cost, |402,850. Dist'ed in the city as follows : 



Ward 1 4 Permits. 

Ward 2 1 

Ward 3 7 

Ward 4 7 

Ward 5 13 " 

Ward 6 8 

Ward 7 7 

Ward 8 14 

Ward 9 19 

Ward 10 29 

Ward 11 22 

Ward 12 34 

Total 165 Permits. 



Reported Cost $ 



37,900 

1,300 

143,700 

18,000 

63,000 

34,100 

33,900 

8,850 

36,150 

8,400 

20,150 

17,400 



Reported cost $402,850 



Classified as follows : 



Stores -. 15 Reported cost...$ 69,900 

Warehouses 5 " 

Factory 1 " 

Bank , 1 

Electric Light Co 1 " 

Extension of Terminal Railroad and^ 

Improvement to Warehouses, >■ 1 " 

Wharves and Presses J 

Street Railroad Car Shed 1 

Laboratory :.» 1 " 

Churches 3 

Dwellings 136 " 

Total Permits 165 



9,000 

3,500 

7,500 

25,000 

135,000 

1,000 

1,500 

32,500 

117,950 

1402,850 



26 



May 07' Bryants Annual Review. 
OLD BUILDINGS IMPROVED. 



114 Permits. Reported cost, $69,635. Distributed in the City as follows: 



Ward 1.... 
Ward 2.... 





.... 9: 
.... 5 
...18 
8 


Permits. Reported Cost.. 

H il (( 

(( (( u 
U <( li 
U (( <( 

(( l( <( 

ts H •( 

u a a 
a ti n 
li 11 11 
a <( (I 

Permits. Reported Cost. 

nd Improvements— 

165 Permits. Reported 

vedll4 

.,..279 Permits. Reported 





..$ 8,600 
1,450 


Ward 3.... 




15,100 


Ward 4 ... 




2 560 


Ward 5.... 




....13 
.... 6 

,... 8 
... s 




16 475 


Ward 6.... 
Ward 7.... 




4,700 
3,900 


Ward 8 ... 




3,300 


Ward 9.... 


3 

10 

19 

7 

114 : 

buildings a 

ings 

ngs Impro^ 




1,800 


Ward 10.... 




2 450 


Ward 11.... 




7,750 


Ward 12... 




1550 








Total 


$69 635 


Total of New I 
New Build 
Old Buildi 


cost.. 

it 

cost.. 


....$402,850 
.... 69,635 


Total 


....$472,485 



WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

Gity Assessor. 



Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891. 



Financial Department. 27 

D. 

Statement of the Number of Permits Issued for the 
Erection of New Buildings, and Old Buildings Im- 
proved, FOR Years 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891. 

NEW BUILDINGS. 

1888. 191 Permits Keported Cost $ 416,730 

1889. 144 " " " 195,600 

1890. 105 " " " 329,775 

1891. 165 '' " " 402,850 



TotaL..605 Permits " " $1,344,955 

OLD BUILDINGS IMPROVED. 

1888. Ill Permits Reported Cost $ 98,855 

1889. 85 " " " 79,225 

1890. 98 " ♦' " 60,910 

1891. 114 " " ' 69,635 



Total.. .408 '' " " $ 308,625 

RECAPITULATION. 

New Buildings 605 Permits... Reported Cost.... $1,344,955 

Old Buildings Improved... 408 " ... " " 308,625 

Total 1,018 " ... " •' $1,653,580 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

City Assessor, 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891. 



28 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 
E. 



Comparison of Assessments with Sales of Real Estate 
FOR Year 1891. 



WARDS. 


Ct-l 

O ^ 
S-i OJ 

1 


Amount of 

Sales. 


Amount of 

Assessments 


Advance 

OVER 

Assessments 




Ward 1 


21 
14 
31 
24 

19 
29 
22 
30 
26 
45 
70 
61 


$ 71,165 
63,015 
206,150 
61,570 
70,295 
92,583 
45,230 
90,590 
20,439 
34,067 
92,132 
32,982 


$ 48,500 
41,450 
159,840 
36,870 
55,330 
54,720 
33,750 
56.400 
13;000 
20,657 
63,433 
21,950 


$ 22,665 
21,565 
46,310 
24,700 
14,965 
37,863 
11,480 
34,190 
7,439 
13,410 
28,699 
11,032 


46 73 


Ward 2 

Ward 3 


52.03 
28.97 


Ward 4 


66 99 


Ward 5 


27 04 


Ward 6 


69 20 


Ward 7 


34 01 


Ward 8 


60 62 


Ward 9 


57 22 


Ward 10 


64 92 


Ward 11 


45.24 


Ward 12 


50 26 






Totals 


392 


$ 880,218 


1 605,900 


$ 274,318 


45 28 







372 Pieces sold above Assessments $278,564 

Amount of Sales $861,209 

Amount of Assessments...., 582,645 

Per cent, of Sales above Assessments 47.81 

20 Pieces sold below Assessments $4,246 

Amount of Assessments $23,255 

Amount of Sales 19.009 

Per cent, of Sales below Assessments. 18.26 



WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

City Assessor, 

Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891. 



Financial Department. 
F. 



29 



Comparison of Assessments with Sales of Real Estate 
FOR Years 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891. 



YEARS. 


o 


Amount of 
Pieces. 


Amount op 

Assessments 


Advance 

OVER 

Assessments 




1888 


326 
331 
312 
392 


1 788,911 
759,121 
780.748 
880,218 


$ 526,840 
502,786 
520,980 
605,900 


1 262,071 
256,335 
259,768 
274,318 


49.74 


1889 


5099 


1890 


49.86 


1891 


45 28 






Totals 


1361 


353,208,998 


$2,156,506 


11,052,492 


48.80 



1,297 Pieces sold above Assessments $1,068,667 

Amount of Sales $3,123,578 

Amount of Assessments 2,054,911 

Percent of Sales above Assessments 52.01 



64 Pieces sold below Assessments $16,175 

Amount of Assessments $101,595 

Amount of Sales 85,420 

Per cent, of sales below Assessments 18.94 



WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

City Assessor. 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

City Assessor. 



30 Mayor Bryants Annual Review, 



REPORT OF CITY SHERIFF. 

Office of City Sheriff. 

Charleston S. C. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Charleston : 

Gentlemen — I respectfully submit the following report 
of the business of this office for the year ending December 
31, 1891. 

Very respectfully, 

GLENN E. DAVIS, 

City Sheriff. 

Taxes Collected by City Sheriff during the year 1891 : 

January— Tax 1888 % 73 32 

Tax 1889 590 19 

Tax 1890 2,107 75 

12,771 26 

February- Tax 1883 100 00 

'' Tax 1887 75 06 

Tax 1888 36 00 

•* Tax 1889 230 35 

" Tax 1890 957 21 

1,398 62 

March— Tax 1887 53 00 

•* Tax 1888 305 95 

Tax 1889 805 14 

" Tax 1890 653 66 

1,817 75 

April— Tax 1888 1 00 

" Tax 1889 328 44 

" Tax 1890 895 91 

, J 225 35 

May— Tax 1888 63 92 

" Tax 1889 256 17 

Tax 1890 537 90 

857 99 

June— Tax 1886 3 52 

Tax 1887 163 14 

Tax 1888 474 03 

*' Tax 1889 901 79 

" Tax 1890 1,072 07 

2,614 55 



Financial Department. 



31 



July & Aug— Tax 1888 78 00 

Tax 1889 659 64 

" " Tax 1890 738 79 

.«ept., Oct., Nov.— Tax 1884 15 00 

Tax 1885 15 00 

" Tax 1887 3 00 

" Taxl888 31 98 

*' Tax 1889 449 43 

Taxl890 988 48 



December — 



Tax 1886 3 00 

Tax 3887 67 00 

Tax 1888 146 52 

Tax 1889 376 22 

Tax 1890 602 28 

Tax 1891... 1,791 31 



1,476 43 



1,502 89 



2,986 33 
$16,651 17 



School Tax Collected. 



January |]82 64 

February 78 36 

March 123 56 

April 96 69 

May 65 69 

June 174 28 

July and August 104 18 

Sept., Oct, Nov 85 34 

December 208 50 

Amount paid' by License delinquents, reported 
through this Office 



1,119 24 



Total. 



2,245 00 
3^20,015 41 



Respectfully submitted, 

GLENN E. DAVIS, 

City Sheriff, 



32 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



CORPORATION COUNSEL. 

The report of this officer shows a large amount of work 
accomplished during the year. The duties of this im- 
portant office have been discharged with fidelity and zeal. 



CORPORATION COUNSEL'S REPORT. 

Charleston, S. C, January 5th, 1892. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Charleston. 

Gentlemen — I respectfully submit my report as Corpora- 
tion Counsel for the past year. 

Judgments for past due taxes have been taken in forty- 
nine cases aggregating twenty-seven hundred and eighty 
yV\ Dollars ($2,780.54) and executions thereunder have been 
issued to the City Sheriff. 

Suits have been issued and judgments obtained in fifty- 
one cases for violations of the license ordinance, aggregating 
eighteen hundred and eighteen y^- dollars. A large num- 
ber of other cases for violations of the license ordinance, 
were instituted but were settled in the Sheriff's Office before 
being put into judgment. The case against J. C. H. Weller 
reported by me last year as being before the Supreme Court 
on defendant's appeal, has since been decided in favor of the 
city. 

The appeals by the Ashley Phosphate Company in the 
cases against them, have been sustained by the Supreme 
Court. All the cases referred to me by your Honorable 
body 'Ho enforce the law" were put in suit. 

I have given nineteen written opinions upon 
questions submitted to me by the various departments of 



Corporation CounseVs Report. 83 

the City Government and by the City Council and its Com- 
mittees. 

In August last one Edward Van Orden of the City of 
New York, brought an action in the United States Court 
for District of South Carolina against the City Council of 
Charleston claiming |43,463, damages for an alleged in- 
fringement of his patent for improvement in feed water 
heaters for steam fire engines. I at once served a demand 
that the plaintiff should give security for costs. This was 
not done and subsequently the plaintiff abandoned the 
case. 

At the request of the Mayor and Aldermen I pre- 
pared the following Memorial and Bill, for submission to 
the Legislature, which has since became a law : 

1. Memorial to the Legislature for an Act authorizing the City- 
Council to issue Coupon Bonds at a rate not exceeding Seven per 
cent, per annum, for the purpose of taking up or exchanging the 
Seven per cent. Coupon Bonds of the City, maturing in 1892, 1893, 
1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897. 

2. The Bill provided for in said Memorial. 

At the request of the Mayor, I prepared the Memorial and 
other necessary papers, resolutions of City Council, memo- 
randum on behalf of City Council with the United States, 
&c., in the matter of the continuation of Concord street 
through the Custom House grounds in the City of Charleston. 
These papers have been approved in Washington, and the 
street is now open. 

At the request of the Mayor and Aldermen, I have pre- 
pared the following Ordinances which have become laws : 

1. A Bill to strike out Sections 465, 466, 467, 468, 469, 470, 471 and 
472, and to insert new Sections in their place. 

' 2. A Bill to authorize the issue of Coupon Bonds at a rate not ex- 
ceeding Five per cent, per annum, for the purpose of taking up or 
exchanging the seven per cent. Coupon Bonds of the City maturing 
in 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897. 

3. A Bill to abolish the Upper Market, situate at the N. E. Cor. 
of Vanderhorst and St. Philip streets, 

3 



34 Mayor Bryants Annual Revieiu. 

Four titles were examined and two deeds to the City- 
prepared for execution to wit : 

1. Mrs. Fanny Alston for the extension of Rutledge street to 
Tradd street. 

2. Mrs. Eliza B. Trenholm for the extension of Concord street. 

I have filed answers setting up claim for City Taxes in 
several cases of foreclosure of mortgage which are now pend- 
ing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES INGLESBY, 

Corporation Counsel. 



The Street Department. 35 



THE STREET DEPARTMEOT. 

The report from this Department shows that the work of 
permanent improvements on our streets has steadily pro- 
gressed, and at a reasonable cost. The intelligent conduct 
of the affairs of this department is well known to all, and 
requires no commendation at my hands. I cannot accept 
the recommendation for the abolition of what is known as 
the " shell road," as this is the only avenue in the city 
which is suitable for pleasure vehicles, and it should be 
kept in repair at least for the present. During the year 
two greatly needed extensions of streets were made, to wit : 
Rutledge Street from Broad Street to Tradd Street, and 
Lynch Street through to Calhoun Street, The East Shore 
Terminal Eailroad has extended its tracks through Con- 
cord Street as far south as Exchange Street. 



Office of Superintendent of Streets, \^ 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891. j 

To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston : 

Gentlemen : I beg leave to submit for your considera- 
tion my annual report for the year 1891 : 

RECEIPTS. 

General appropriations $55,000 00 

2-mill betterment tax 40,164 83 

From all other sources 1,751 25 

Total receipts $96,916 08 



36 Mayor Bryan's Annual Revivw. 

Expenditures during the year accounted for as follows : 

SCAVENGER DEPARTMENT. 

Miscellaneous , I 3,405 56 

Forage 6,062 80 

Repairs 1,116 90 

Labor , 11,851 05 

$22,436 31 

Expense account, salaries, printing, &c 1,436 48 

General repairs, labor I 2,318 15 

General repairs, material 504 56 

■ 2,822 71 

General Police, labor 110,626 45 

General Police, material 691 50 

■ 11,317 95 

Hardware 459 20 

Lime and cement 554 45 

Bricks , 273 34 

Brick pavements and drains, labor ,.. 1,538 50 

Stone-flag 9,327 82 

Stone cobble, labor 1,712 35 

Stone curb 3,095 98 

Stone granite blocks 17,601 15 

Flag pavements, labor 2,929 51 

Curbing and crossings, stone, labor 916 95 

Stone granite blocks, roadway repairs, labor 816 70 

Stone granite blocks, hauling and tallying 798 78 

Plank road repairs, labor 359 80 

Wooden curbs and crossings, repairs, labor 381 80 

Lumber 1,880 38 

Pipe drains, labor | ],228 93 

Pipe drains, material ,. 995 87 

2,224 80 

Earth, shell and gravel, labor $ 158 90 

Earth, shell and gravel, material 1,538 42 

1,697 32 

Meeting street shell road, labor | 807 35 

Meeting street shell road, material 1,251 15 

2,058 50 

Hutledge street bridge drain 4,036 70 

Anson street stone roadway 540 35 

State street stone roadway 1,439 50 

Hayne street stone roadway 77 15 

Meeting street stone roadway 3,073 05 

Chapel street stone roadway 630 65 

Friend street stone roadway 477 90 

Total $96,916 08 



The Street Department. 37 

STONE ROADWAYS. 

The combination stone roadways in Meeting street, has 
been continued from Mary to Sheppard street, eighteen 
feet of block, and the sides of cobble, as in last year. Anson 
street, has been paved from Pinckney to Market, eighteen 
feet of block in the centre, and cobbles on the sides, Hayne 
Street was paved with block, from Anson west to include in 
front of the doorway of the Brewery. State street, from 
Market to Broad, has been paved with a combination of 
blocks and cobbles. Friend street, has been paved entirely 
with blocks, from Broad to Tradd. 

The following are the measurements of each roadway: 

Anson street, 650 yards granite blocks, 1,149 yards 
cobble ; Hayne street 338 yards granite blocks ; State street 
3,1G0 yards granite block, 2,417 yards cobble ; Friend street 
1,546 yards granite blocks; Meeting street roadway, 4,712 
yards granite blocks, 8,546 yards cobble. 

The cost per square yard for each roadway is as follows : 

Anson street « ^^1 72 

Hayne street 2 04 

State street. 2 07 

Friend street 2 12 

Meeting street Roadway 2 04 

BLUE STONE FLAG PAVEMENTS. 

The following sidewalks have been laid during the year : 

Wall street 2,861 feet. Reid street 2,796 feet 

Amherst street 2,285 " America street 247 " 

Spring street 5,243 '' Vanderhorst street..ll,591 " 

Tradd street... 4,809 " Water street 2,854 " 

George street 988 " King street 866 " 

BLUE STONE CUKB. 

Year by year the effort is being made to replace the old 
wooden curbs ^ith Stone. 



38 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



The following have been done this year 



South bay 557 feet. 

Concord street 721 '* 

Inspection street 795 " 

Chapel street 502 " 

Tradd street 496 " 

Laurens street 129 " 

George street 205 " 

Crab street 175 " 



Vernon street 728 feet. 

Marsh street 427 " 

Bogard street 2,562 " 

America street 33 " 

King street 89 •' 

Vanderhorst street. ..... 911 " 

Water street 60 " 



BRICK PAVEMENTS. 

The repairs to brick pavements has been continued 
wherever required. 

The following is a list of the new work : 

Broad street. .320 yds. pavement, Tradd street 277 yds, pavement. 

King street...222 " Lightwood alley,123 " 

Water street. 82 " Logan street 77 

Legare street 67 •' 

The following brick drains were cleaned during the year : 
Water street, Church street and King street. 
Temporary repairs and cleaning has been done in many 
other drains. \ 

PIPE DRAINS. 

The system of pipe drains has been continued with satis- 
faction ; in fact, I think it is the only proper system for 
this city. The following is what has been done during the 
year: 

Percy street 450 feet 12 inch 

Percy street 56 " 8 " laterals 

Payne street 614 " 18 " 

Payne street 54 ' 12 " laterals 

Payne street .38 " 8 '* laterals 

Sires alley 500 " 12 " 

Shepherd street 300 " 8 " 

Drake street 100 " 12 " 

Reid street 100 '' 8 '' 



PLANK ROADS. 



The usual expensive repairs have been necessary, but 
Avith the definite system of permanent work which has 



The Street Department. 39 

been adopted, I trust, in a few years, this expensive and un- 
satisfactory work will be unnecessary. 

WOODEN CURBS AND CROSSINGS. 

This class of work, which for the present is necessary, I 
hope will be steadily curtailed with the stone which is 
yearly bought for this purpose. 

MEETING STREET SHELL ROAD. 

This road is in good condition, but I regret to say that 
the cost of maintenance is increasing every year. The 
road-bed seems to have been worn away, and the winds 
have blown the fine shell off from the roadway, so as to 
leave but a thin covering of shell. At present this roadway 
costs more for repairs than I think is warranted, and I sub- 
mit for your serious consideration the proposition of sub- 
stituting another class of roadway, which may cost more 
in the beginning, but will be cheaper in the end. I do not 
see how this road can be abandoned, as it is the principal 
drive out of the city to the cemeteries and other places of 
interest. Twenty-seven thousand three hundred and eighty- 
eight bushels of shell were used on the road during the 
year. 

SCAVENGER DIVISION 

This division of this department has been efl&ciently 
managed by the officers who had it in charge. The num- 
ber of loads of garbage hauled during the year, 32,681. In 
addition to the scavenger work proper, large amounts of 
sand, gravel, shell, stone and bricks have been hauled 
without extra cost to the city. 

Very respectfully, 

T. A. HUGUENIN, 
Superintendent Streets. 



40 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



REPORT OF HEALTH OFFICER. 

The same watchful care which has characterized the 
Health Department in the past still continues, and has 
been productive of the best results. Among the most 
important duties assigned to its keeping is the care of the 
sick poor of the city. Under the existing Ordinances 
ample provision is made for this class of our community, 
and the restriction preventing the Health Physicians from 
taking private practice for pay, greatly enhances the value 
of the public service in this respect. The poor have had 
better attention, and there have been fewer complaints. 
The recommendations made by this Department as to 
inspection of food and plumbing, and the improvement of 
the sewerage system, require the most serious consideration 
at your hands. 



REPORT OF HEALTH OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1891, 



City op Charleston, So. Ca., ) 

Department of Health, January, 1892. i 

To the Hon. the Mayor and Aldermen : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit my annual 
report, conveying the tables of vital statistics and meteoro- 
logical observations, with such procedures of this Depart- 
ment as have been undertaken for the benefit of this 
Department, and the general health of the city, for the 
year 1891. 

There has been no epidemic in the city during the past 
year, except a visitation of La Grippe, which also visited 
the entire country — 15 white and 21 colored deaths occurred. 
The Epidemic was most general. A few deaths have 
occurred from diphtheria — whites 2, colored 1. Total 3. 
No scarlet fever deaths, and very few deaths from typhoid 



Health Department. 41 

fever; in fact, there have been fewer deaths from typhoid 
fever in 1891 than for twenty years past. This is most en- 
couraging, and might be well regarded as a good test of 
cleanliness and good water. 

There were 234 deaths from diarrhoeal diseases. This is 
far above the average, and is a very large number, it is 
most suggestive of a great necessity for some protection 
against improper and impure food. 

Consumption claims 41 white and 203 colored victims. 
Total 244 — one death in every eight deaths from this disease. 

QUARANTINE. 

The Quarantine Station of Charleston Harbor at Fort 
Johnson continues to give the greatest satisfaction. 

It is furnished with all modern scientific appliances, and 
while all restrictions to commerce are recognized as irk- 
some, the detention has been reduced to a minimum num- 
ber of days. 

The Holt System, embracing — Steam heating — at 230 
degrees, Bi-chloride of mercury spray, and sulphur fumi« 
gation 18 per cent., furnishes a complete system of disin- 
fection. 

Communication with the post is maintained with a 
naphtha launch, which has given the most complete satis- 
faction. 

The two wharves have been found to be most convenient 
— one furnishing disinfection and the other giving full 
opportunity for the discharge of ballast. 

No diseases of a contagious or infectious type have 
appeared at the station during the past year. Dr. Lebby, 
Quarantine Officer, has been constantly on duty during the 
year, and continues to bestow his energy, zeal and thorough 
proficiency. 

There were 230 arrivals at Quarantine during 1891. 



Steamships 100 

Barks 75 

Tug 1 



Brigs 38 

Schooners 35 

Small Boat 1 



42 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



Africa 2 

Canary Island 1 

Central America 1 

Coastwise 45 

Germany SJ 

Holland 1 

Newfoundland 2 

Portugal 6 

South America 7 

Teneriffe 1 



Belgium 8 

Cape de Verde 4 

Chili 2 

France 1 

Great Britain 27 

Mexico 1 

Norway 2 

Sicily 29 

Spain 6 

West Indies.... 53 

Total 230 



SANITARY INSPECTORS. 

The city is divided into 4 Sanitary Districts — to each of 
these is assigned a Sanitary Inspector. It is the duty of 
these Inspectors to superintend the carrying off of the gar- 
bage in the earlier hours of the day, and later to visit fifty 
premises, and to report as to the condition of these premises 
and where the necessity occurs to have the privies and 
drains cleansed. Many thousand notices to owners indicate 
a vast amount of work. These officers have been faithful, 
and the service is most efficiently done. 

In this connection it is most important that the recom- 
mendations of the Board of Health to City Council should 
be carried out, viz : that there should be provision made for 

Inspection of food. 
Inspection of plumbing. 

There can be no gainsaying the statement that an im- 
mense amount of unsound food is sold in Charleston every 
year. 

Every year the amount of plumbing work is multiplying 
and it is most necessary that this work should be done 
according to requirements, such as the Board of Health 
deem proper for the public health. 

DISINFECTION. 

This very important work is most satisfactorily done 
under the immediate attention of Mr. F. Nipson. We feel 
assured that our great immunity from infectious and con- 
tagious disease is greatly due to the very rigid custom of 



Health Department 43 

furnishing a full supply of disinfectants to every house 
which is reported as having a case of contagious or infectious 
disease — at the termination of every case the health detec- 
tive, Mr, Nipson, fumigates most thoroughly with sulphnr 
dioxide gas. 

There was not a death from scarlet fever last year, and 
but three deaths from diphtheria — at once, as a case is 
reported the greatest care is taken to instruct the dwellers 
on the premises as to the importance of protection — circulars 
are furnished as well as the disinfectants. During the 
summer months deodorizing solutions are placed in all 
public places which require it, and a supply of disinfectants 
is furnished to any and all who ask for it. 

62 houses were fumigated and disinfected. 
6,892 persons were supplied with chloride of lime and 
38,700 gallons of copperas solution were distributed, 

3 horses and 2 mules, suffering from glanders, were 
killed. 



44 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



INTERMENTS. 



Interments were made within the city limits during the 
year 1891 at the following burial grounds ; 



WHITES. 



















.• 


}Jt 


F>7, 


b 














1 '' 


8 


^ 


a 


pd 










c» 


m O 


Fi 


^5 




1 




§■ 

s 








0) 

> 

o 



St. Philip's Church yard 

St. Michael's Church yard 

St. Paul's Church yard 

St. Mary's Church yard 

St. John's Lutheran Church yard 

St. John's Chapel Church yard 

St. Peter's Church yard 

1st Baptist Church yard 

1st Presbyterian Church yard 

2d Presbyterian Church yard 

Bethel Church yard 

Trinity Church yard , 

Circular Church yard 

Unitarian Church yard 

Wentworth St. Lutheran C'h y'rd 
K. K. Beth Elohim Church yard.. 

Seamen's Church yard 

Hanover Street, Jewish 



Total 9 12 7 210 



4 3 5 7 5 8 78 



COLORED. 



bJ3 



Ephrat 

Colored Lutheran 

Colored Catholic 

Colored Baptist Cemetery, Line St. 

Bathsheba 

Calvary, Episcopal... 

Colored Scotch 

Macphelia 

Brown Fellowship 



Totals 13 1016 512 8 13 7 15 5 8 20 132 



Health JDepartment. 



45 



PUBLIC CEMETERIES. 







February. 

March. 

April. 


^ 
§ 


i 
1 


August. 
September, 


Si 

o 

1 

O 


s 

O 


1 

Q 


02 

1 


White 




1 
26 

27 


2... 

18 20 

1 

90 20 


4 
17 

21 


3 3 2 
35 26 31 

38 29'-'^-^ 


1 
30 


3 
32 

35 


1 

24 

25 


3 
19 

22 


'>i^ 


Colored 


26 
26 


304 


Totals 


(W 






^ 




'"" 









SCAVENGERING. 

The removal of garbage from the city is entirely under the 
control of the city authorities. The carts are owned by the 
city, and a superintendent is directly charged with the duty 
of overlooking them. The result is, that at a minimum 
cost the garbage is removed, and removed at an early hour. 



For the last ten or twelve years this procedure has been in 
operation, and has worked most successfully. Not cmly is 
the garbage removed at an early hour, but an immense 
deal of work is done for the city — the carts being employed 
after the removal of garbage, in doing city work — nearly 
all the city hauling for the paving of the- streets has been 
done in this way. The city has in this method complete 
control, and can concentrate without any additional cost. 
The garbage is hauled out of the city to outlying salt marsh 
lands and serves a most useful purpose in making a founda- 
tion for roadways through the salt marsh. The number of 
loads removed during the year was 32,681. 



January , 2,281 

February 2,007 

March 2,135 

April 2,442 

May 2,582 

June 2,620 



July 3,395 

August 3,187 

September 3,063 

October 3,429 

IS'ovember 2 915 

December 2,625 



46 Mayor Bryants Annual Bevieiv. 

NIGHT SOIL. 

During the past year there were 2,152 vaults cleaned out. 
The best that is possible is done in reference to this very 
great nuisctiice. The vaults continue to be the greatest 
nuisance in the city, and have been so for many a long year. 
Were it not that our soil is more or less percolated to a great 
■ extent with salt water, it would be a probable source of serious 
unhealthiness. They are certainl}^ very offensive. During 
the long summer months these receptacles and storage 
vaults for material that is constantly undergoing decompo- 
sition and emitting pestiferous odors continue to suggest a 
most important departure, and that is the removal of the 
excreta of the city by water conduit. It is to be hoped that, 
at an early day, with the success of a new artesian well that 
is about being dug, that a sufficient supply of water will be 
afforded to make a beginning, and at least undertake the 
lower section of the city. It occurs to us that the city could 
be divided into four sections, and commence sewerage first 
as far as Broad street, then up to Calhoun street, then to 
Spring street, then beyond. 

CITY DISPENSARY SERVICE. 

The city dispensary physicians report during the past 
year, 1891, 25,829 cases treated in the four Health Dis- 
tricts This is a' monumental charity. As will be seen, 
thousands of our poor have skilled medical attention, and 
drugs furnished ; and that effected at a very small amount, 
when the immense work is recognized. 

I am glad to be the means of testifying to the great loy- 
alty of these medical officers. It is a most harrassing ser- 
vice, and it is well performed. Whites and blacks receive 
equally the attention required on demand. There were 
20,029 blacks and 5,800 whites attended- 

During the year there were 19,269 prescriptions dispensed 
free of charge. 

Health District No. 1 4,886 | Health District No. 3 2,796 

Health District No. 2 6,044 | Health District No. 4 ..5,543 



Health Department. 47 

FINANCIAL. 

Appropriations $16,180 00 

Amounts expended 16,169 84 



Surplus $ 10 16 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. B. HORLBECK, M. D., 

Health Officer. 



48 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 
MORTUARY STATISTICS. 



Report of the Number of Deaths in the City of 
Charleston in Each Month for the Year 1891. 



WHITES. 



Causes of Death, 


§ 







1 
< 


May 
June 
July 


4^ 

CO 

be 


i 
f 


1 


s 

CD 


B 


02 

1 


Absopss 




















1 
2 


"] 




1 


Alcoholism 


1 


1 


1 




1 


... 


2 


"i 




9 


Anasarca 


1 


Anfpmia 




1 












1 
4 

1 

20 
9 


Aneurism, Aorta 

Angi na Pectoris 


1 


... 


... 


1 




1 




1 






"i 

2 


Apoplexy 

Asthrna 


2 


2 


4 


3 
1 


"i 


1 


1 


2 


1 




2 


Ataxia . 
















1 


.'.. 


1 


2 
1 
9 

4 

3 
2 

1 
11 
4 
5 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 


Bowels, Inflammation of 

Brain, Congestion of 

Brain Effusion on 


"i 


... 


2 


i 


"i 
1 


1 
1 

2 








i 

1 


;;; 


2 
1 


... 


1 


1 


Brain, Softening of. 

T5rflin Tumor on 


1 










1 




... 


Bronctiiectasis . 














1 
1 


1 


Bronchitis 




3 


1 

1 


2 


1 

1 

1 


"1 


... 


1 


1 

"i 


1 
1 

1 


Bronchitis Capillary 




Cancer 

Cancer Colon 


1 




Chancer T^iver 




















1 


"1 


Cancer, Mammary 

Cancer Pylorus 


... 


... 






"i 


1 






1 




Cancer Stomach 






1 
















Cancer Throat 




1 




















Cancer Uteri 






1 


1 














1 


Catarrh, Senile . ... 








1 
2 
1 
4 












Cholera Infantum 










3 
"i 


8 
1 
3 




1 
1 
4 








14 

5 

41 


Cholera Morbus 






1 

2 


"s 


'4 


1 
2 


3 

1 

1 


Consumption 


5 


3 


Consumption, Laryngeal 


1 


Convulsions 




1 
1 


"i 


1 


3 


4 


4 

1 




4 


1 


1 


90 


Convulsions, Puerperal 

Croup, Membranous 




3 
I 
















Cystitis 


1 














"i 


3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 


"1 


"2 
1 


5 


Debility 


2 


... 


1 
1 




2 




8 


Dementia... 







Dentition 


2 
















3 


Di arrhoea 


2 




1 


... 


1 


1 

1 
4 




1 


7 


Dronsv 




3 


Dvsenterv 










3 


2 


11 


Diphtheria 













Eczema 










1 


... 


1 








2 


Embolism, Cerebral 






1 






... 






... 


1 



Health Department. 49 

Deaths in the City of Charleston — (Continued.) 

WHITES. 



Causes of Death. 




u 


si 
P 


< 


& 
^ 






< 


1 

a 

1 


<v 

o 

O 


B 

> 



a 




Enteritis 










1 
4 


1 

2 


"i 


4 




2 
1 


"2 


.... 
1 


4 


Entero Colitis 










15 


Fever Catarrhal 




1 






1 


Fever, Enteric 










1 


... 




... 


... 


1 


.... 


2 


Fever. Gastro Enteric 


1 










1 


Fever, Malarial 












1 
1 

3 


•• 




... 


1 




s 


Fever, Puerperal 






1 

"l 

2 


.... 




"l 


9 


Fever Typhoid , 


2 


1 




... 


3 
1 
1 


"i" 


"3 

'i 


10 


Gastritis 


9 


Gastro-Enteritis 






.... 


1 


2 


... 




1 


10 


Goitre 






1 


Hgemorrhage, Intestinal 










■■i 


% 






1 


Hsematocele 


















1 

5 


"2 




1 


Heart, Disease of 


1 


5 

1 
1 


4 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


26 


Hemiplegia 


1 


Hepatitis 




... 




... 






... 


1 




.... 


"i" 

1 
"9 


9 


flernia 




1 


Hydrocephalus 






1 


1 


... 






... 


... 


1 


... 


9 


Hydrothorax 




1 


R 


Inanition 




1 


... 


... 


1 


1 


... 


1 


5 


Influenza .... 


3 


3 

1 
2 


15 


Intussusceptio 




















1 


Kidney Bright's 


1 


... 




2 
1 
3 
1 


1 




1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


14 


Kidney, Congestion of 


1 


Kidney, Inflammation of 


1 
1 


... 


1 


1 


1 

i 


.... 


1 
1 


"l 


1 


"1* 


.... 


s 


Liver, Cirrhosis of 


4 


Liver, Congestion of 


s 


Lungs, Abscess of 








1 




T 


Lungs Congestion 




1 




... 





2 


1 


... 


1 


1 


1 


10 


Lungs. Haemorrhage 

Lymphadenoma... 


1 


1 






] 


















1 


Mania 




















1 
2 


"2 


1 


Marasmus 




1 
1 
2 

1 


"i 




4 
1 

2 


4 

"i 


2 

1 
1 


1 


3 


1 


90 


Measles .... 


1 


f> 


Meni ngitis 


... 




2 


1 


.... 


10 


Meningitis, Cerebro-Spinal 




1 


Metrorrhagia 


2 
















1 






3 


Neurasthenia 






1 












1 


Occlusion, Intestinal 
















1 
5 


"3 
2 


"2 
1 


"2 

2 


1 


Old Age 


2 
1 


4 

1 


2 
1 


1 
3 


2 

2 




1 


2 


9| 


Paralysis ... 


18 


Partux'ition 


1 


Pemphigius 


















1 


"i 


"2 


"i 


1 


Pericarditis 










1 








2 


Peritonitis 




2 


... 


1 




2 


... 






Perityphlitis 




1 


Pleuritis.... 












1 












I 
16 


Pneumonia 


5 

i 


2 
















5 


4 


Pneumonia, Pleuro.. 


















1 



50 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Deaths in the City of Charleston — (Continued.) 



WHITES. 



Causes of Death. 




OS 

3 

Si 


03 










be 

< 


1 

a 


Si 

o 
O 


g 

> 

o 


a 


3 


Pnfeumonia TvdIio 






1 




















1 


Prostatitis 












] 












1 


Prostate EDlarsred . 












1 
I 












1 


























1 




1 










1 
1 












^ 


Septicoemia 






1 




... 


1 
1 






... 




8 


Skull Fraoture of 








1 


Sninp Tniurv of 






1 


















1 


Stomaoh TTlceration of 
























1 


Syphilis *. 






1 








' 




1 

.... 
] 

1 


1 


Tabes, Mesenterica 

Trismim Nasoentium 






... 


v'.'. 

1 2 


1 

"i* 


1 
3 
1 




1... 

1... 

5|3 


1 
1 

2 
2 


4 

7 


Tuberculosis 


2 




1 


21 


Tumor 


',^ 


Tumor, Ovarian 


1 






1 












1 


Unknown 














1 




1 


1 


8 


Urethra Stricture 


1 






1 








1 






1 


1 
















1 


Vermes - 




]^ 


1 
















1 


Volvulus 




1 
1 

1 

37 


! 
















1 


WhooninsT Couffh 






i 1 


... 

50 


1 
58 


24 


11 1 
li 1 


2 

44 


1 

52 


5 


Wound, Gunshot 


1 
44 


52 


7 


Totals 


3751 


52 


52 


553 



HectUli Department. 51 

Deaths in the City of Charleston — (Continued.) 
black and colored 



Causes of Death. 






1 


< 




s 




1 

be 

< 


$4 

1 
1 




s 

1 




a: 

3 

o 


Absoess 1 .. 




















2 


... 


^ 


Adenitis i ... 
















1 




1 


















1 




1 


Albuminuria ... 


1 








1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 




] 


s 


Alpobolism ' 








9 


AmDntation 






















1 


Anjpmia 






















1 


Ariasarna ••• 








1 




1 










8 


Aneurism ■... 










1 


1 

... 


] 
3 


"i 

3 


9 






1 
4 


\ 






1 

2 


4 


Apoplexy j 3 

Artbritis ... 


1 


...... 






1f> 




1 




1 








1 






1 




•• 


2 


3 


"Rlarldpr Catarrb of ... 






1 




1 




1 


T^owpIs FT^prnorrhaorp of .- ' 






1 












1 
1 


1 


Bowels, Inflammation of 1 

T^rain Absoess on ' 






'" 


1 
1 

1 




1 


1 




... 


1 


6 
1 


Brain, Congestion of ; 1 


1 


2 
... 


... 


2 


1 






1 




2 


8 
4 


Brain Hfemorrb.as'e of 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 


"l 


i 


2 




4 












4 




1 
3 


2 

1 


"f 


1 










3 


Broncbitis 

TiT'onobitis Caniliarv 


1!... 

2 


o 

1 
1 


'l 


2 


5 


5 


5 
3 


28 
10 










1 








! 




1 










1 






' 


' 


1 










1 
'l 


2 


Cancer, Pylorus -..,. \ 1 

Cancer, Uteri. | 2 






1 




1 
1 




"l 


2 


1 


... 


\ 

... 


1 
1 


1 

14 

... 


"l 

11 


1 


9 

9 


Cbolera, Infantum \.. 

Cbolera Morbus 1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


5 
1 


1 
1 




..' 


43 
4 

1 


Pirrbnsii^ ... 




1 

19 
5 

1 
1 














1 


Consumption 29 

Convulsions 4 


11 
2 


18 
3 
1 
2 


17 
5 

"i 
3 
5 


20 
3 

2 
3 
5 


8 
6 
1 
3 
3 
3 


15 
2 
2 
4 
3 
2 


21 
3 


15 
2 


19 
3 


11 

7 


203 

45 

5 


Bebilitv 


6 
1 
1 


2 
3 
1 
1 
3 


2 
5 


4 
3 

1 


3 

4 


5 


33 


Dentition 

Piarrboea 


33 
18 

1 


Dropsy 3 


2 


...| 1 
1 ... 
1 ... 

o 


1 


1 
2 

i 

4 




1 


3 


1 


... 


16 
3 


Droosv Benal 




1 


1 


1 

1 


... 


"i 


"i 


4 


Dysentery 1 


... 


18 
1 






1 














1 


1 



























52 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Deaths in the City of Charleston — (Continued.) 

BLACKS AND COLORED. 



Causes OF Death. 


a 




Si 


< 


^ 

^ 






<1 


Si 


1 

1 
O 


% 
i 

> 



g 

CD 
P 


CO 

3 


j^jQtcritis 






3 

9 


"i 


1 

4 
1 

1 


2 
9 


2 

14 

1 


3 
4 
1 


2 

7 
1 


... 
4 
3 


2 
4 


"3 

1 


15 


lilntero Colitis 


1 

1 


... 


53 


P^DileDSv 


q 


Femur Fracture of 


1 


Fever Bilious 














2 
1 
1 

2 










9 


Fever Continued 
















... 


... 




... 


1 


Pever Gastric 


1 
1 












2' 
2 

1 
3 
1 


4 


Fever Malarial 


... 


... 




2 
3 


1 


8 


2 


1 




19 


Fever Puerperal 


4 


Fever IVDhoid 


3 


1 


1 




3 

2 


3 


2 
1 


2 


1 


1« 


Fever Typho Malarial 






2 
1 


fi 


Fistula 




1 


... 


... 




s 


rrano^rene 






1 








1 












1 


... 


3 

2 


1 
3 




"1 


1 


fi 




1 
1 








8 


Haemorrhage 

Hsemorrtiage XJm.bilical 


1 




... 


2 




A 






1 

4 


2 
5 


"5 


"7 


1 

4 


4 


Heart Disease of 


2 


4 
3 


4 


4 


4 


2 
1 


2 
1 


47 


Hemiplegia 

Hernia 


5 








1 




1 


Hernia Strangulated 


1 

1 










1 
o 


1 






1 

2 


3 


HvdroceDhialus 


1 




... 


... 


f^ 


Hydro Pericardium 


1 


Hydro Thorax 






1 
1 
1 


2 


1 

2 

2 














9 


Inanition 


2 

2 


2 

7 


1 


S 


2 


1 


... 


4 


3 

9 


23 


Influenza 




21 


I nsolation 






1 


1 


... 


... 


9 


I n tussusceptio 


1 
1 
3 












1 


9 


Jaundice 


1 


1 


"l 


1 








1 


"i 


1 


3 


Kidney's Bright's Disease of 


2 
1 


1 


2 


1 


14 


Laryngitis 


1 


Diver, Abscess of 


2 






















9 


Liver, Cirrhosis of 






1 


1 

1 




1 


... 


1 




1 




5 


Liver Congestion of 








1 


Liver Hypertrophy .. . . 


1 
1 
4 














"2 

7 


4 


1 


liiver Inflammation of 


1 

2 


2 
1 
1 
1 


1 
3 












2 

"i 
10 


5 


Lungs, Congestion of 


2 


2 


1 


2 

1 

12 


1 

8 


?4 


Tjuncs, Haemorrhage of 


4 


Marasmus 

IMeasles 


3 


1 


4 
1 
4 


5 

2 
2 


13 
1 
2 


12 
4 
1 


80 
q 


Meninoritis 




1 
1 






1 
1 


3 
1 
1 


4 

"i 

2 


18 


Meningitis, Cerebro Spinal 




3 


Necrosis 


















9 


Nephritis 


1 


2 


"l 

3 
2 
1 


2 


2 


3 






3 


1 


Ifi 


Neurasthemia 


1 


Old Age 


1 
4 

i 1 


1 
4 


2 
4 


4 

2 


B 








3 

4 
1 


4 

1 


9 

1 
1 


3? 


Paralysis 


4 


2 
1 


3 


2 


3? 


Parturition 


5 



Health Department. 53 

Deaths in the City of Charleston — (Continued.) 

blacks and colored. 



Causes of Death 






Pericarditis 

Peritonitis 

Peritonitis, Puerperal... 

Perityphlitis 

Pharynx, Abscess 

Pharyngitis 

Pharyngo Laryngitis... 

Pleurisy 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia, Broncho... 

Pneumonia, Typho 

Pyaemia 

Rectum. Ulcer of., 

Kheumatism 

Sarcoma 

Scrofula 

Septicaemia 

Septicaemia, Puerperal.. 

Shock 

Skull, Fracture of 

Stomach, Ulceration 

Stomatitis 

Synovitis 

Syphilis 

Syphilis, Hereditary 

Syphilis, Tertiary..'. 

Tabes 

Tetanus 

Thyroid Gland Enlar'g. 

Taxaemia, Malarial 

Trismus Nascentium 

Tuberculosis 

Tumor 

Uraemia 

Vermes 

Whooping Cough 

Wound, Punct 

Wound, Gun Shot 



Total 130 94 94 81 120 151 134 107 123 105 110 15? 1371 



1 
6 
2 
1 
1 
'> 

1 
4 

59 
1 
6 

1 



1 

9 
6 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 
8 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
75 
51 
1 
3 
4 
3 
2 



54 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 
Accidents, etc. 



WHITES. 







t 




ft 

<3 






^ 


be 

<I1 


a 

CO 




s 


a 
> 



1 

a 

<v 


Q 


1 


Accident 


1 


1 

1 

... 




1 




2 


o 




2 








q 


Cyanosis 


1 


Drowned 


1 


1 




1 




"2 

4 


1 
1 


1 


"6 
6 


— 


1 


5 


Buicide 


P> 


Undeveloped 


1 

8 





1 


1 


1 


10 


Total 


"^8 



























BLACKS AND COLORED- 





S 


1 

a; 


si 


ft 
< 


^ 
g 






4J 
CO 

<1 


a 

ft 


s 




a 




1 

s 

8 


3 


Accident 








2 


1 


3 
"'2 


"l 
2 


1 


ii... 


1 
1 




9 


Burn 


2 




2 
1 




... 
2 


6 


Drowned 


7 


Suicide 


1 




1 


Undeveloped 


2 
2 


2 
5 


2 
4 


1 





8 


5 

8 


3 5 

4 6 


2 


2 


5 
5 


?:7 


Total 


3 


50 



STILL BORN 



PREMATURE. 





White. 


Color' D. 


White. 


COLOR'D. 




q3 


a 


1 


q5 


oi 

r^ 
^ 


OS 
1 




a 
1 


1 


-2 


a5 


1 


J anuarj'' 








6 
7 
6 
4 
4 
9 
5 
J6 
6 

13 
13 
15 

104 


3 
3 
3 

2 

5 

8 

11 

13 

10 

8 

7 

9 

82 


9 

10 

9 

6 

9 

17 

16 

29 

16 

21 

20 

24 

186 




1 


1 


February 










March 




! 


"2 


1 


1 

2 








April 






... 






May 




2 2 




June 


2 

2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
1 

14 


2 
3 
3 
1 
2 
2 
3 

18 


4 
5 

5 
3 
5 
4 

4 

32 


1 

i 

1 


1 

1 

"3 


2 
1 
1 
4 


■3 
1 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 


July 


4 


August •... 


1 


September 


2 


October 




November 














December 














Total 


5 


7 


12 


4 


5 


9 



Healtli Department. 55 

Number of Deaths in each Ward in each Month, 1891. 



Whites. 







. 




















;h' 




Wards. 


I' 


s 


4. 












a 


fe 
^ 


a 


1 


. 




4 


^ 

Q 
t^ 




< 


^ 




•-3 


be 


E 
^ 






1 


1 




No. 1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


: 


1 


3 


3 


2 


4 


27 


No. 2 


3 


1 


1 


2 






1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


4 


19 


No 3 


3 


3 


5 


4 


6 


3 


6 


1 


7 


7 


4 


4 


53 


No. 4. 


3 


4 


1 


2 


5 


2 


5 


3 


4 


6 


3 


3 


41 


No. 5 


6 


5 


2 


3 


7 


5 


4 




4 


1 


5 


4 


46 


No, 6 


4 


5 


2 


4 


5 


4 


1 


i 


6 


2 


2 


3 


39 


No. 7 


4 





3 


9 


5 


4 


4 


3 


4 


3 




2 


39 


No. 8...... 


8 


/ 


9 


6 


5 


7 


4 


3 


10 


5 


10 


6 


80 


No. 9 


4 


5 


5 


3 


6 


7 


10 


4 


4 


7 


5 


7 


67 


No. 10 


2 


2 


1 


6 


5 


4 


7 


9 


2 


11 


3 


2 


47 


No. 11 


4 


10 


5 


2 


2 


8 


6 


3 


4 


6 


7 


11 


68 


No. 12 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


9 




3 




1 


2 


27 


Total.... 


44 


52 


37 


37 


51 


50 


58 


24 


52 


52 


44 


52 


553 



Colored. 



Wards. 


c 




1 




1 


H-5 




1 


a 

1 


s 
8 


B 


a 


1 


No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3...... 

No. 4 

No. 5 

No. 6 

No. 7 

No. 8 

No. 9 

No. 10 

No. 11 

No. 12 

Total.... 


6 

4 

6 

12 

13 

5 

13 

21 

7 

11 

20 

12 

130 


4 
3 

8 

11 

9 

4 

4 

21 

5 

7 

10 

8 

94 


9 

2 

2 

6 

6 

6 

11 

16 

3 

8 

14 

11 

94 


5 

6 

4 

8 

4 

4 

4 

18 

3 

11 

11 

3 

81 


4 

2 

2 

10 

12 

13 

10 

17 

7 

15 
14 

120 


4 

4 

5 

17 

16 

7 

8 

35 

7 

10 
27 
11 

151 


9 

1 

3 

8 

11 

9 

15 

20 

9 

11 

26 

12 

134 


4 

7 

4 

12 

6 

1 

6 

20 

4 

10 

16 

17 

107 


s 

6 
9 
9 
5 
10 
16 

10 
25 
14 

123 


4 

3 

3 

11 

8 

7 

6 

18 

4 

11 

18 

12 

105 


7 

2 

1 

6 

12 

6 

13 

20 

10 

11 

7 
110 


6 
4 
4 
11 
11 
3 

15 
24 
6 
13 
14 
11 

122 


70 

42 

48 

121 

117 

70 

115 

246 

72 

128 

210 

132 

1371 



56 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



Number of Deaths, with Ages, in each Month, for 
THE Year 1891. 

WHITES, 



Ages. 



Under 

From 

From 

From 

From 

From 

From 

F'rom 

From 

From 

From 

From 



' 1 year of age 

1 to 5 years 

5 to id years 

10 to 20 years 

20 to 30 years 

30 to 40 years 

40 to 60 years 

50 to 60 years 

60 to 70 years 

70 to 80 years 

80 to 90 years. 

90 to 100 years 



Totals 44 52 37 37 51 50 58 24 52 52 44 52 553 



94 
65 

7 
12 
55 
56 
56 
56 
64 
60 
27 

1 



Number of Deaths, with Ages, in each Month, for 
THE Year 1891. 

blacks and colored. 



Ages. 


P 


OS 


o 


ft 
< 


^ 

S 


CD 
H-3 




< 


i 


o 
O 


a 

> 
o 


1 

a; 
o 


1 


Under 1 year of age 

From 1 to 5 years 

From 5 to 10 years 

From 10 to 20 years 

From 20 to 30 years . ... 

F'rom 30 to 40 years 

From 40 to 50 years 

From 50 to 60 years 

From 60 to 70 years 

From 70 to 80 years 

From 80 to 90 years 

From 90 to 100 years... 

Totals 


24 

9 

5 

13 

17 

14 

18 

11 

10 

7 

2 

130 


16 
11 
3 
9 
15 
8 
5 
8 
6 

'\ 

94 


23 
5 

8 

7 

'I 

11 

8 
2 
4 
3 

2 

94 


19 

8 
3 
8 

17 
6 
5 
5 
4 
4 
2 

81 


37 

18 

3 

8 

11 

14 

6 

8 

3 

6 

3 

3 

120 


51 

27 

3 

5 

14 

11 

10 

6 

9 

8 

5 

2 

151 


43 

37 
3 
7 

15 
7 

10 
2 
7 
2 
1 

134 


26 

20 

3 

8 

15 
12 
4 
4 
8 
4 
3 

107 


25 

30 

4 

10 

17 

11 

5 

6 

8 

7 

123 


20 

20 

2 

7 

12 
10 
5 
10 
6 
7 
5 
1 

105 


23 
14 

7 
17 

9 

18 
6 
6 
8 
2 
1 

110 


33 
14 
5 
4 
11 
12 

? 

12 
8 
9 
1 

122 


340 

213 

42 

93 

178 

118 

103 

81 

89 

77 

37 

10 

1371 



Health Department. 



57 



Number of Deaths in Each Month, with Place of 
Nativity, 1891. 

WHITES. 



Natives of 






i 


< 




6 


•-5 


CG 

< 


1 


1 

s 
8 


1 
1 


1 

a 

P 


02 

3 


City of Charleston 

South Carolina 

Bavaria 


22 

7 


25 
9 


23 
5 
1 


16 
5 


31 
5 


32 

4 


40 
4 


IS 

4 


25 
12 


27 
11 


21 
4 


CI 

8 


306 

78 

1 


Bohemia 




















1 


"1 


1 


China . 


















1 




9 


Denmark 














1 

2 




1 


England 


1 








2 


1 








1 




7 


Finland 


1 

1 
5 

7 






1 


France 




1 
5 
1 


1 
4 
5 
1 








1 
2 
3 










8 


Germany . 


7 
4 


3 
3 

1 


3 
3 
1 

1 


2 
4 


2 

5 

1 

... 


2 
4 

'i 
1 


4 

7 
1 


2 
6 


37 


Ireland 


56 


Italy 


6 


]Sorway „ 






1 


Nova Scotia 












1 


Kussia 












1 


1 




1 


4 


Scotland 


1 


... 


... 


1 


2 


4 


Spain . ... 












1 




1 


St. John's N B 








1 














1 


Alabama ... , 


















2 






2 


Florida 












1 








1 


Georgia 








1 


2 














3 


Maryland 




1 
1 






1 


... 

... 


"1 
1 

2 


1 


1 

i 
1 


*1 

*1 
1 
1 


3 


Massachusetts 

New Jersey 


1 




... 




1 


4 
1 


New York 


1 


... 


1 


1 


1 
11 


1 


1 


1 


11 


North Carolina 


6 


Pennsylvania .... . . 




1 






^ 


Rhode Island ... . 




















.1 


1 


Tennessee 


















1 


1 


Vermont 




1 










1 

1 

58 






^ 


Unknown 






1 




1 
50 


24 


1 
52 


1 

52 


44 


52 


5 


Totals 


I4 


52 


37 


37 


51 


553 



58 



Mayor Bryants Annual R 



eview. 



Number of Deaths in Each Month, with Place of 
Nativity, 1891. 



Black 


and 


Colored. 














Natives of 










& 
^ 






to 

3 
< 


a 


1 





CD 


1 


City of Charleston 


79fil 


67 
21 


56 
22 

1 
1 


94 
23 


92 
47 


108 
17 


76 

28 


89 
29 


64 
31 


73 

.26 


91 
30 


950 


South Carolina.... 


44 

1 


27 


345 


Alabama 


2 


Florida 














1 
1 




? 


Georgia 




2 
1 


4 


... 





3 


1 






n 


Louisiana 








1 


Maryland 
















1 








1 


New York 














1 
3 










1 


North Carolina... 




1 


1 


... 




4 




3 






1 


15 


Pennsylvania 




1 


" "i 


1 


Rhode Island 




















1 


Tennessee 


1 
2 

3 

130 




















1 


Virginia 


2 
94 


1 

94 


1 
81 


120 


2 

6 

161 


1 

1 

134 


1 

1 

107 


1 
123 


1 

8 

105 


2 

6 
110 


122 


10 


Unknown.. 

Totals 


30 
1371 



Health Dc/partment. 59 

Comparative Statement as to Sex, in Each Month. 



Months. 





Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Gr. Total 



January ... 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July ...... .. 

August 

September 

October 

November. 
December . 

Total.. 



24 


20 


44 


59 


71 


130 


27 


25 


52 


46 


48 


94 


18 


19 


37 


46 


48 


94 


20 


17 


37 


37 


44 


81 


28 


23 


51 


45 


75 


120 


27 


23 


50 


64 


87 


■ 151 


23 


35 


58 


74 


60 


134 


15 


9 


24 


44 


63 


107 


34 


18 


52 


62 


61 


123 


27 


25 


52 


56 


49 


105 


26 


18 


44 


49 


61 


110 


27 
296 


25 

257 


52 
553 


59 


63 


122 


641 


730 


1371 



174 
146 
131 
118 
171 
201 
192 
131 
175 
177 
154 
174 



1924 



Marriages. 



Births. 



Wh. Col. Total 



Wh. Col. Total 



January ... 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 
December . 



Total 



176 



14 


31 


16 


28 


15 


40 


25 


34 


9 


20 


16 


29 


16 


26 


5 


20 


11 


33 


20 


26 


22 


37 


8 


32 



45 
43 
55 
59 
29 
45 
42 
25 
44 
46 
59 
40 



356 



532 



49 


87 


30 


84 


49 


82 


32 


61 


30 


56 


49 


77 


44 


79 


54 


92 


48 


100 


26 


90 


28 


75 


31 


96 


470 


979 



136 
114 
131 
93 
86 
126 
123 
146 
148 
116 
103 
127 

1,449 



Twins— Whites 3. Colored 11. Total 14. 



60 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



Table Showing the Total Number of Cases Treated, 
AND OF Deaths, in the City Hospital and Health 
Districts, During Each Quarter, 1891- 





WHITES. 

QuAKTER Ending. 


BLACK & COLORED. 

Quarter Ending. 


i 

CO 

6 


cases treated. 


1 


a 

1-3 


o 

CO 
CO 

a 

w 


CO 

a 
S 

o 


a 




a 

»-5. 


a 

0! 


03 
X3 

s 


d 

o 
Eh 


"3 

m 

s 

a 



city Hospital 


119 

366 

93 

1157 

31; 


91 
391 
102 
428 
314 


116 

408 

1^ 

458 
173 


169 
498 
114 
641 
184 


495 
1663 

437 
2684 
1016 


153 
1028 

787 
1396 
898 


178 
1721 
1445 

877 
987 


178 
1575 
1675 
1212 

979 


180 
1607 
1696 
1191 

955 


689 
5931 
6603 
4676 
3819 


1184 


Health District, No. 1 


7694 


Health District, No. 2 


6040 


Health District, No. 3 

Health District, No. 4 


7360 
4835 


Totals 


2080 


1326 1288 


1606 


6295 


4262 


5208 


5619 


5629 


20718 


27013 






deaths. 
























City Hospital 

Health District, No. 1 

Health District, No 2 


10 
6 

6 
2 

24 


7 
5 
2 
8 
4 

21 


14 
3 
1 
4 
1 

24 


8 
6 

2 


16 


39 

20 

3 

15 

7 


30 

27 
18 
22 
21 

118 


34 
34 
37 

22 
23 

150 


25 
32 
35 

19 

30 

150 


32 
20 
33 

22 
22 

1?,9 


121 
113 
123 

85 
105 

"547 


160 
133 
126 


Health District, No. 3 

Health District, No. 4 


100 
112 






Totals 


84 


631 











Health Department 61 

Total Moktality i89i — Whites, Black and Colored. 



Sex and Status. 


a 


1 




ft 


& 
g 


a 

3 

1-5 


^ 
3 
^ 


13 
< 


B 
S 


s 

o 
O 


1 

> 
o 


B 


1 


Male, White 


24 

20 


27 

95 


18 
19 


26 

17 


28 
23 


27 
23 


23 
35 


15 

9 


34 

18 


27 
25 


26 
18 


27 
25 


296 


Female, White 


257 




1 




Totals, White 


44 


52 


87 


37 


51 


50 


58 


24 


52 


52 


44 


5? 


553 


Male, Black & Colored 
Female, Black & Col'd 


59 
71 


46 

48 


46 
48 


37 
44 


45 

75 


64 

87 


74 
60 


44 
63 


62 
61 


56 
49 


49 
61 


59 
63 


641 
730 


Totals, Black & Col'd 


130 


94 


94 


81 


120 


151 


134 


107 


123 


105 


110 


122 


1371 


Grand Totals 


174 


146 


131 


118 


171 


201 


192 


131 


175 


157 


154 


174 


■|qo4 







Estimated population— White, 28,870 ; Blacks and Colored, 36,295 ; 
Totals, 65,165. Proportion of Deaths^Whites, 1 in 52 ; Blacks and 
Colored, 1 in 26 ; Total proportion, 1 in 33. 

Ratio per 1000 in the year— Whites 19.15 

" " " Blacks and Colored 37.77 

^' " " Total. 29.06 



Comparative Mortality 



Years. 



Whites. 



3 
ft 
O 






-3 ^ 
o a> 

Ph o 



Blacks & Colored 



3 
ft 
O 



11 



2^ 



o o 
ftp 

Ph o 



1891 
1890 
1889 
1888 
1887 
1886 
1885 
1884 
1883 
1882 



28,770 


553 


1 in 5-' 


36,295 


28,770 


511 


lin56 


36,295 


27,605 


516 


lin52 


32,540 


27,605 


492 


1 in 56 


32,510 


27,605 


549 


lin50 


32,540 


27,605 


571 


lin48 


32,540 


27,605 


487 


lin56 


32,540 


25,000 


592 


lin42 


27,286 


25,000 


540 


lin46 


27,286 


25,000 


554 1 in 45 


27,286 



1.371 
1,310 
1,431 
1,375 
1,316 
1,596 
1,250 
1,215 
1,285 
1,172 



lin26 
lin28 
lin23 
lin23 
lin24 
1 in 20 
lin26 
lin22 
lin21 
lin32 



62 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

LONGEVITY. 

1891— Whites— Longevity Report. 

Date of Death. Age— Yrs. 

January 23— A. J. Doran 80 

February 14— Maria Finley 80 

February 14— Augustus R. Taft 81 

February 17 — Cath. A. Griswold 88 

February 18— Margaret M. Duval 89 

February 19— Margaret J. Cobia 80 

March 26— Joseph Triest 81 

Mareh28— Mary Murphy ....97 

April 5 — Adeline Van Ness 85 

April 9— Sister Mary Stanislaus 81 

April 15— Mary Teresa Barbera 89 

April 21— Wm. J. Matthiessen 80 

April 27— Matthew Byan 81 

May 4 — Mary Mazyck 89 

May 19— Sabina Elliott Sangster 80 

May 21— Isaac I. Merritt 83 

May 27— A. J. Addison ...83 

June 17— Elizabeth H. Geiger 88 

June 20 — Hannah A. Lawrence 86 

August 2— Ann Elizabeth Miller 82 

September 17— Elizabeth B. Haile 80 

October 14— John H. Mangles 82 

October 16— Duncan N. Ingraham 88 

October 24— Margaret Card 83 

November 22— Catherine D, Wilson 80 

November 26— Ann W. Rentz 86 

December 2 — Robert W. Burnham 81 

December 8— Ann Nolan 87 

1891— Colored. 

January 7 — Thomas Middleton 80 

January 30— Susan Davis f. 81 

February 13— Lucy McNeil 85 

February 17— Matilda Brown 85 

March 8— Julia Nesbit 85 

March 14— Sarah Marshall 83 

March 17 — Rebecca Brown 96 

March 26— Sarah Kinloch 80 

March 31— Kitty Barnwell 92 

April 9— Jane Scott 80 



Health Department. 63 

Date of Death. Age— Yrs. 

April 22 — Louisa Jackson 83 

May 1— Elizabeth Alston 86 

May 25— Jacob Mills 92 

May 26— Lewis Gadsden 89 

May 28— Mary Moore 83 

May 30— Cornelia Harris ^ 90 

May 31— Cynthia Jeannerett 90 

June 2— Maria Edwards 97 

June 2— Isabella Jennings 80 

June 19- -Maria Morgan 81 

June 21— A. Mitchell 97 

June 21— Peggie Black 85 

June 26— Jane Richardson 83 

June 28— David Jones 80 

July 18— Diana Coxum 85 

August 22— Barbara Grayson 85 

August 23— Eddy Williams 85 

August 31 — Flora Johnson 81 

October 4 — Nelson Eicliardson .....81 

October 10— Sarah Perry 87 

October 23— Jack Bradley 87 

October 25— Rosetta Holmes ....: 91 

October 26— John McRae 87 

October 31— Nancy Polite 80 

November 4 — Hester Lawrence 80 

November 8 — Dolly Johnson 98 

November 16 — Hannah Sheppard 80 

December 2— Jas. Middleton..... 80 

December 7 — Maria Gabon 86 

December 15— Lucy Lawson 82 

December 19— Rachel Bryan 80 

December 20— John Parker 80 

December 22— David Hill 84 

December 24— Patsy Wilson 84 

December 26— Susan Gapers 90 

December 27— Maria Drayton 85 

December 27— J. Williams 80 

December 30— Jos. Maxwell 80 



64 Mayor Bryan's Annual Review. » 

ANNUAL SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSER> 
VATIONS MADE BY THE WEATHER BUREAU, 
CHARLESTON. S. C, 189 L 



AIR PRESSURE. 

Mean, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea-level, 30.10 
inches. 

Highest, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea-level, 30.70 
inches, November 19. 

Lowest, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea -level, 29.55 
inches, February 26. 

Annual range in pressure, 1.15 inches. 

AIR TEMPERATURE. 

Mean, 66,5 degrees. 

The average annual temperature of Charleston, for 20 
years, is 66.0 degrees and for the months — January, 49.9 
February, 53.7; March, 56.7; April, 64.2; May, 72.7 
June, 78.8 ; July, 82.3 ; August, 79.8 ; September, 75.4 
October, 67.7 ; November, 58.9; December, 5L9. 

Highest, 95, July 4. 

Lowest, 29, February 27 and December 1. 

Annual range, 6(j. 

Greatest daily range, 28, March 6. 

Least daily range, 3, October 11. 

Greatest monthly range, 51, in February. 

Least monthly range, 25, in September. 

Mean monthly range, 39. 

Mean daily range, 14. 

Number of days on which temperatures were above 90 : 
21 days; in May, 1 day; June, 5; July, 4; August, 11. 

Number of days on which temperatures were below 32 : 
3 days; in February, 1 day; November, 1 day, and Decem- 
ber, 1 day. 

Last Ice formed March 15. 

First Ice formed November 30- 



Health Department. 65 



HUMIDITY. 

Mean dew-point, 59 degrees. 

Mean Relative humidity of the air, 84%. 

WEATHER. 

Mean cloudiness, (scale to 10 tenths,) 5.1 tenths. 

Greatest raonthly cloudiness, 7.0 tenths, in March. 

Least monthly cloudiness 3.1 tenths, in April. 

There were 120 cloudless days, distributed as follows ; — 
January, 13; February, 8; March, 5; April, 19; May, 11 ; 
June, 8; July, 6; August, 11 ; September, 11 ; October, 14 ; 
November, 12 ; December, 7. 

There were 140 partly cloudy days, distributed as fol- 
lows: — January, 9 : February, 12 ; March, 6 ; April. 10 ; 
May, 12 ; Juno, 13 ; July, 9 ; August, 19 , September, 14 ; 
October, 9; November, 12 ; December, 15. 

There were 105 cloudy days, distributed as follows : — 
January, 9 ; February, 13 ; March, 20 ; April, 1 ; May, 8 ; 
June, 9 ; July, 16 : August, 1 ; September, 5 ; October, 8 ; 
November, 6 ; December, 9. 

WIND. 

Prevailing direction : — Northeast. 

Total movement, 62,401 miles- 
Greatest monthly movement, 6,910, in February. 

Least monthly movement, 3,205, in August. 

Greatest daily movement, 437, December 18. 

Least daily movement, 15, August 15. 

Highest velocity, 36 miles, N. W., November 18. 

Number of times the wind was observed blowing from 
theN., 91 times; N. E., 150; E., 78; S. E., 49 ; S., 32 ; 
S. W., 141 ; W,, 69 ; N. W , 60 ; number of calms, 120. 

The average hourly wind velocity for the year is 7.1 
miles. The hourly values are: — 1 a. m., 5.6 miles; 2 a. m., 
5.6 ; 3 a. m., 5.5 ; 4 a. m., 5.4 ; 5 a. m.> o.^ ; 6 a. m., 5.7 ; 7 
a. m., 5.9 ; 8 a. m., 6.5 ; 9 a. m., 7.2 ; 10 a. m., 7.6 ; 11 a. m., 
8.0 ; 12 noon, 8,6 ; 1 p. m., 9.3 ; 2 p. m., 9.9 ; 3 p. m., 10.2 ; 
4 p. m., 10.0 ; 5 p. m., 9.7 ; 6 p. m., 8.5 : 7 p. m., 7.4 ; 8 p. 



6^ Mayor Bryants Annual Review, 

m., 6.4 ; 9 p. m., 5.9 ; 10 p. m., 5.6 ; 11 p. m.. 5.7 ; 1 2 mid- 
night, 5.6. 

PRECIPITATION. 

Total, 45.50 inches. 

Greatest monthly, 8.98 ins., in July. 

Least monthly, 0.99 inch, in February. 

Greatest in any 24 consecutive hours, 3.81 inches, July 
19 and 20. 

The average annual precipitation of Charleston for 20 
years, is 56.98 inches, and for the months — January, 4.07 
inches; February, 3.46 ; March, 4.01 ; April, 4.06; May, 
4.06 ; June, 5.28 ; July, 7.40 ; August, 7.31 ; September, 
6.09 ; October, 4.36 ; November, 3.26 ; December, 3.62. 

There were 129 days on which 0.01 inch or more of pre- 
cipitation occurred. 

Thunder-storms occurred as follows : — in February, 1 ; 
March, 1 ; May, 1 ; June, 5 ; July, 3 ; August, 2 ; Septem- 
ber, 2 ; November, 1 ; December, 1. 

The last frost occurred April 6. 

The first frost occurred October 21. 

L. N. JESUNOFSKY, 
Observer, Weather Bureau. 

Charleston, S. C, January 5, 1892. 



Health Department. 67 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Charleston, S. C, December 2d, 1891. 

Report of Dr. H. B. Horlbeck, 19th Meeting op the 
American Public Health Association held in Kan- 
sas City, October 20-23, 1891. 

The badges presented by the local committee of arraDge- 
ments to the members of the A. P. H. A. at Kansas City 
indicated the comprehensive character of the meeting. In 
the centre of each of these badges are grouped three flags — 
Mexican, Canadian and the Stars and Stripes. 

This will give an idea of the present membership of the 
Association — about 150 members of the United States, 13 
from Mexico and several from Canada 

These men were brought together to meet each other for 
the nineteenth time, to confer together as to the best means 
of lengthening human life, abrogating disease, and dimin- 
ishing human suff'ering. 

They met at ten o'clock on time in the auditorium. 

Doctor Montizambert, of Canada, the President, declared 
the Association convened ; after the initiatory business, the 
Association commenced work. 

Dr. McDonald, of Kansas City, read the first paper : on 
infant mortality. He said that infant mortality soon after 
birth was 20 per cent, and where the infant, is fed by artifi- 
cial means, it reached 50 per cent., with natural food, the 
mortality was but 10 per cent. ; in reference to artificial 
foods, he said that he was opposed to all of them outside of 
the milk they contain ; there was no good in any of them. 
One of the principal causes of mortality was exposure to a 
low temperature — a chilly room soon after birth, forcing 
sleep by soothing syrups was also another evil. 

The best artificial food was milk, pure cow's milk ; no 
starchy substance could be digested in the infant stomach. 



G8 Mayor Bryants Annual Review, 

Starchy infant food is converted by the chemical processes 
of the stomach first into sugar, then alcohol and then acetic 
acid, when nature gets ready for starchy food^ she gives 
teeth. No sensible farmer would attempt to feed a calf on 
hay. 

Dr. Sharp read the next paper ; on glanders in man. He 
classed glanders with acute infectious diseases, such as 
tuberculosis. This terrible disease is readily transmitted to 
man and he gave a report of a case which had occurred in 
his practice ; he recommended that for the prevention of 
glanders in persons coming in contact with the disease or 
horses having open sores or discharges from the nose, they 
should disinfect the hand with a solution containing a 
tablespoonful of equal parts of carbolic acid and glycerine 
in a quart of hot water ; or, ten grains of corrosive sublimate 
in a quart of water. 

Dr. Paquin told of seventeen cases of glanders in man that 
he knew of as occurring in the State, as an instance of the 
virulence of the poison, he told of a case occurring from a 
horse to a man driving behind. He was struck in the eye 
by a spray from the beast's nostril, glanders developing rap- 
idly and ending in the man's death. 

A very excellent paper was then read by Chief Justice 
Horton, of Kansas, on the necessity of more stringent legis- 
lation to repress empiricism: he said that upon health the 
happiness and prosperity of the world depended. All assist- 
ance or promotion along this line was among the highest of 
missions and the noblest of all aspirations. Empiricism is 
one of the worst obstacles in the path of the progress of 
medicine, it is of old origin and has been traced back to 
ancient Greece, A few learned men then belonged to the 
empirical school or school of practical observation, but most 
of the empirics were unlearned. The word means now only 
an ignorant quack. 

He is full of coarse wit and low buffoonery- He is totally 
ignorant of medicine — medicine is medicine, he says to 
liimself, and one doctor is as good as another* He gets to 
the corner of a public square, calls for a deaf man, poars a 



Health Department. 69 

few drops in his ear and then calls out in a loud voice that 
the man is cured. The man is probably an accomplice. 
There are a number of varieties in empirics, in another 
specimen of quack, there is more tact and dignity. He has 
more education. He secures testimonials from prominent 
people. Mixes his own vile compounds, charges large fees, 
injures the public health, the medical profession and the 
finances of the community, and departs unscathed. By law 
the legislatures have the power to regulate empiricism. The 
Legislature may prescribe the qualifications of those who 
practice whether they have sufficient learning and skill. 
Attempts have been made by the Legislature of Kansas and 
other States to suppress empiricism, but so far but little good 
has been done. 

He spoke eloquently of the legitimate practitioner of 
medicine. He was the wise counsellor, the skilled restorer, 
the sympathetic friend. 

To protect the public the A. P. H. A. should recommend 
the enactment of Statutes excluding from the medical profes- 
sion those whoarenotcompetent, by learning, skill and expe- 
rience to practice, and punishment by imprisonment, for 
any who violate the provisions No one should be permit- 
ted to practice medicine or engage in surgery unless author- 
ized to do so by a competent Board of government or State 
examiners. 

Mr. Allen Hazen, of Mass., then read a paper on water 
supply and public health. He said, typhoid fever and 
cholera bacteria are taken into the system through food and 
drink. Pure water is, therefore, a necessity. If water is abso- 
lutely free from' sewage it can be depended upon as compara- 
tively pure, although many waters not polluted by sewage 
have been known to breed disease. Flowing streams will par- 
tially free themselves. Reservoirs and long channels where 
water flows and becomes aerated, will not always purify it. 
Some system of filtration is therefore imperative, and the 
question to be decided, is the best means of filtration, and 
all present systems are, more or less defective. 

Doctor Horlbeck then presented some facts in relation to 



70 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

the comparative death rate among the white and black race. 
He indicated that in a number of cases the death rate was 
double among blacks to that among the whites. He offered 
resolutions shewing the importance of having a separate 
list published as to the whites and as to the blacks, and said 
that the U. S. Marine Hospital service only published the 
total in American cities. This did not fully give the 
ratio as to the two races. The resolutions were adopted re- 
questing the marine service to publish separate lists. Black 
and white races. 

It is the custom of the A. P. H. A. to have the first even- 
ing set apart to hear the annual address of the President. 
On this occasion there were speeches of welcome from the 
governors of Missouri and from the State of Kansas, also 
from Hon. John L. Peake, of Kansas City, The auditorium 
building was filled by a large and attentive audience. A 
grand band of music was stationed in the orchestra seats 
and discoursed beautiful music. The scene was a hand* 
some one, the stage was filled with the officers and the 
Mexican contingent. 

Governor Francis gave a most eloquent welcome to the 
Association ; he said among other things that the age was 
intensely practical, but is constantly growing less celfish. 
A bioader humanity is daily taking root in the hearts of 
man. Church and State and Society, enlightened, pro- 
gressive, philanthropic, and practical, are all working to a 
common end — the elevation of man. 

You who have assembled for the purpose of giving to 
each other and to the world, the results of your labor and 
research for better sanitation, and the prevention of disease, 
are leaders in the great contest and the State and hu- 
manity acknowledge obligation to you for scientific appli- 
cations and discoveries. 

In addition to its moral grandeur this sanitary work has 
a material value almost incomprehensible and certainly 
incalculable. If labor is the basis of all value, every hu- 
man life must possess its proportionate worth. The city or 
the State which adopts and enforces with firmness and im- 



Health Department. VI 

partiality, the strictest sanitary regulations, not only en- 
hances its material interests, but adds a charm to the attrac- 
tions of home, and inspires its children with a more devoted 
patriotism. Missouri recognizes in you representatives 
of the most advanced thought of the times and the 
highest type' of citizenship and salutes you as public ben- 
efactors. 

Dr. Montizambert then delivered his annual address, he 
said ; The objects of this Association shall be the advance- 
ment of sanitary science, and the promotion of organiza- 
tions and measures for the practical application of public 
hygiene ; this is the definition of our constitution. An ac- 
knowledged interest in, or devotion to sanitary studies and 
allied sciences, and to the practical application of the same. 
That is the qualification for admission and that alone; it is 
not confined to the medical profession. Any one is welcome 
to our ranks who takes an interest in the grand objects of 
the prevention of disease, and the raising of the standard of 
the people's health. Last year we met in a sea coast city, 
and quarantine — the prevention of disease from without 
getting into the country^ — came prominently under consid- 
eration. This year we meet in an inland city and health 
organizations to prevent disease and to deal with disease, 
that had got in, seem natural!}^ to invite the greater atten- 
tion. There are two main strings to a sanitary bow — a 
system of maritime sanitation at the ports of entry, and a 
system of prevention and preparedness in the interior com- 
munities. Neither is sufficient without the other. Coast 
quarantine and inland health organizations form our double 
line of defense. As to the necessity for a common fight against 
disease, quoting Spencer Wells, he said ; " Instruct your 
mayor and corporation, your clergy, and household, that 
cases of typhoid fever, diphtheria, small pox, measles or 
whooping cough, can no longer be looked on as natural 
providential or unavoidable, but that their existence is a 
proof of ignorance and negligence, and a disgrace to the 
country, to the town, and to the family. Sunlight, pure air, 
and cleanliness, are natural enemies of disease germs. These 



72 Mayor Bryants Annual Review, 

cannot li\e where they have not their natural food, which 
is found in dampness, darkness, mould and dirt." 

The experiments of Koch, Ransome and others, prove 
that the living germs of consumption, when exposed to the 
sunlight, lose their vitality, in a few hours, or even in a few 
minutes, if the layer in which they are exposed be thin 
enough, and that even ordinary daylight, if it last long 
enough, will have a similar effect. 

On Wednesday morning the Association were carried 
out to the slaughter houses, which form so large a part of 
the prosperity and industry of Kansas City. I was among 
the twenty-five who went through the Armour packing 
house. It is most certainly an interesting sight to note the 
method of disposing of the carcasses of 1,500 cattle and 
3,000 hogs ; as they said there was no waste, and nothing 
escapes them but the squeak of the hog when his throat is 
stuck with a keen thrust knife. All this killing is under 
careful inspection, and no meat is used that is even sus- 
picious. 

There is an inspection by the United States authorities 
specially for trichina — in the hog — for export. There is 
a Vet. Surgeon, E. L. Dundas, in charge of the work. A 
piece of the hog is taken from the diaphragm and also from 
some other portion of the hog. These pieces are put in a 
tin box, joined together by a wire and with a number cor- 
responding to the number upon the carcass, the same pieces 
kept in the cooling room. These tin boxes are carried to 
the Laboratory, which is several squares from the slaughter 
house. Here there is a well lighted microscopical room, 
and twenty-two young women are seated at tables, each 
with a microscope, busily engaged in a hunt for the 
trichina When they are discovered the fact is recorded 
upon a card, and this, with the tin box, are given to the 
superintendent of the Laboratory, who re-examines the 
same and confirms the report or not. If confirmed, the 
carcass corresponding to the tag in tin box is condemned, 
and the same is taken from the cooling room and carried 
to the fertilizer tanks : 3 or 4 per cent, of the hogs exam- 



Healtli Department 73 

ined have the trichina, as the examination can only be had 
with a very small percentage, and this for export, it would 
seem a happy thingthat these trichina are killed in cooking, 
otherwise man would be victimized to a dreadful degree. 

The whole establishment is a gigantic model of manage- 
ment to subserve the ends for which it is used. A large 
part of the meat is cooked and put in tins ready for imme- 
diate use, A bellowing steer and a squealing hog are run 
into the abbattois, and they come out in very pretty 
commercial (decorated tin) packages ready to be sent over 
the world. 

The Association convened at 11.30. The first paper read 
was by Dr. P. Paquin. Subject: Vaccine and Vaccination. 
He spoke of the necessity for absolutely pure virus. He 
said that virus should not contain any foreign substance 
whatever. He graded virus as absolutely pure, fairly pure, 
comparatively pure, impure, septic and dangerous. He 
claimed that all the trouble arising came from impure virus. 
In the discussion that followed, it was deemed proper that all 
virus sold by the manufacturers should be registered, and 
a copy kept carefully of the record. The general concensus 
of opinion was in favor of bovine virus. Dr. Ycaza, of 
Mexico, said that it had been found best in Mexico to use 
humanized virus. The whole question of the collection and 
culture of the virus was under the absolute care and con- 
trol of the Government. There are doctors whose whole time 
is devoted to this matter of vaccination. All children are 
required to present themselves at stated periods for vaccina- 
tion. The healthiest subjects are alone taken for the culture 
of the virus, and the result has been to drive small-pox 
epidemics from the land. He thought that everything 
depended on the intelligent handling of the virus by the 
physician using it, and is satisfied that its proper handling 
need cause no trouble to the patients or any friends 

Dr. Paquin in his paper said that he had found specimens, 
among others, of the following Bacilli : Bacillus Pyoge- 
nesis Foetidus, Stahylococcus Pyogenesis Aureus, Bacillus 
Septicus and a Gangrene Micrococcus. 



74 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Dr. Gayol, engineer of the City of Mexico then read a most 
interesting paper on the recent drainage works of that city. 
The city of Mexico, he said was situated at the bottom of 
the valley of the same name, inclosed by mountains, which 
are of great altitude on the eastern western and southern 
sides. On the north there is a depression, this rises about 
250 feet above the city. 

This valley contains 3 natural and 3 artificial lakes. 
Lake Texcoco natural lake, is the lowest and the most ex- 
tensive ; and receives the refuse of the city. Its waters are 
strongly impregnated with salts, chiefly carbonate of soda, 
and these keep the waters healthy, though for several cen- 
turies the lake has received the refuse of hundreds of thou- 
sand of people. The bottom of the lake has risen by these 
accretions, until now its bottom is but 6 feet below the mean 
city level. This difference of level was the only means of 
giving current to the city's sewage and its decrease often 
causes a general inundation. To guard against this trouble a 
system has been devised. This project includes a tunnel six 
miles long and a canal thirty miles long. It will take care 
of the sewage of the city. 8,000,000 cubic feet of dirt are 
being removed monthly from the canal and the tunnel is 
being pushed through at the rate of 600 feet a month. It is 
expected that the work will be finished in 3 years, and it 
will result in the drainage of lake Texcoco. The sewers are 
arranged to be flushed every day by water from two of the 
lakes, to the full capacity of the pipes which will be 66,000 
feet for drainage a minute with a velocity of two feet a 
second. This rate of speed being essential to carry off the 
solids which would accumulate. 

Professor Delos Fall, Chairman of the Committee on the 
disposal of Garbage than read a valuable report. He spoke 
of the intimate relation of typhoid fever, and the accumu- 
lation of waste of organic matter. He described the various 
methods used, and said that in New York the method is to 
take the garbage out to sea and dump it ; Philadelphia 
recommended cremation. Chicago objected to using the garb- 
age for filling waste places and then building on it. San 



Health Department 75 

Francisco recommended cremation, Baltimore has dumps 
which are objectionable. St. Louis gives its garbage to a 
desicating company, which is under contract to remove the 
same. In Charleston the city moves its own waste out early 
during the day, and dumps it on to a salt water marsh. 
Milwaukie has been using the Mertz system, but now dumps 
it into the lake. The methods in use are dumping away from 
human habitations, cremating it, and desicating it. 

Dr. Clark recommended a galvanized iron tank holding 
about two or three bushels as the best receptacle for holding 
garbage. Th e tank must not be placed on the street or sidewalk 
but the collector should be made to go in, and get it, remove 
the contents and replace the cover. The appearance of many 
beautiful streets was destroyed by those unsightly boxes 
and barrels. For transporting garbage dumping carts were 
best for short hauls, and wagons for long hauls. The beds 
of these carts should be made water tight and made of iron. 
They should be flushed after each load and the driver who 
neglected this most important sanitary proceeding should 
be punished, or better, discharged. Dr. Clark preferred the 
Mertz system to all others. This consists in disposing of 
the garbage in a furnace, It renders the organic matter into 
a fertilizer, and extracts the oil and the refuse is dumped 
for filling. 

At the evening's session Dr. Kinyoun read a paper on 
Rabies. He said that this terrible disease was almost entirely 
transmitted by the Canine and Feline species. This disease 
prevails over the entire globe except in Australia, where the 
disease is unknown. He regretted that so little is known 
of this disease, and so little report is made of the disease. 
He said that the best sources of information were the public 
press. He opposed the idea that the disease was more com- 
mon in summer, or confined to warm weather. The statistics 
showed the greater number of deaths as occurring in May 
and December. The disease rarely appears later than six 
months after inoculation. He spoke of the Pasteur institutes 
and of their great success, the percentage being very 
small where the proper application of the system was had, 



76 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

He said that the Saliva became virulent several days 
before any symptoms appeared. Recognition is not easy in 
the early stages in the animal. He advocated strict Quaran- 
tine regulations in order to eradicate the disease, especially 
the prolonged and universal wearing of the muzzle by all 
dogs throughout the country. 

On Thursday morning the Advisory Council held a 
meeting for the election of officers, and also to decide 
the place of the next meeting. It soon became evident 
that the Association thought it proper to accept the 
invitation tendered by President Diaz to meet in Mexico 
City. This being the case it was a matter of great con- 
sequence that some officer should be chosen who could 
speak the Spanish language. Dr. F. Formento who is a 
gifted linguist, was unanimously chosen, and Mexico City 
was chosen for the place of meeting next time. 

On assembling at the morning session Dr. Bryce, of 
Toronto, read a paper on The present position of the milk sup- 
ply problem^ from the Public Health standpoint, and some prac- 
tical methods for securing safe public supplies. ITe stated that 
there were about 15,000.000 milk cows in the United States 
and about 1,000.000 in Canada. Each one of these gives 
about 100 gallons of milk annually. He said that experi- 
ments had demonstrated that tuberculous cows could trans- 
mit tuberculosis to the human subject through the milk 
secretion. Statistics were shown giving a large proportion 
of cows infected with tuberculosis or consumption. Cows 
with infected tissues cannot furnish normal milk. 

How to get pure milk ? 

1. It is especially desirable, that a system of periodic 
veterinary inspection be exercised in addition to the dairy- 
man's inspection. 

2. Strong views should be held and exercised regarding 
the nature and quality of food of cows. All decomposed 
foods as those which are liable to undergo fermentation, 
should be wholly avoided. The best foods are well ripened 
grains and grasses. 

3. The stables of the cows are a point of great importance. 



Health Department. 77 

Too often dark, damp, ill-ventilated and crowded pens 
have been the home of this chief of our food supplies. 
It is quite possible to keep even 'on a large scale, a dairy 
stable free from the ordinary disagreeable stable odors. The 
water supply to the cows is of equal importance. 

4. The care of the milk at the time of taking and subse- 
quently is of all points at once the most difficult and the 
most necessary to supplying a wholesome milk. As De- 
Claux has said ''cleanliness is everywhere the sine qua non.'^ 
This means almost a revolution amongst farmers and 
dairymen. The sterilizing of all cans and bottles by steam or 
dry heat, and the boiling of all strainers will be necessary. 

5. The delivery of the milk is of prime importance, 

6. When milk has reached the consumer it must be 
placed in a refrigerator or promptly consumed. 

Dr. Snow, Chancellor of the Kansas University, delivered 
a most interesting address on the Chinch Bug, This is a 
most terrible burden to Western farmers. He said that 
Chinch Bugs did $100,000,000 of -harm every year in the 
United States. 

After this statement Dr. Snow certainly kept the full 
attention of the Association. He said that for the past three 
years he had been engaged in trying to diminish these 
ravages- It had been noticed that these bugs suffered from 
certain diseases, notably a fungus. It was proven that 
Sporotrichum-Globuliferum and Empusa-ApJiidis are capable 
of producing fatal results among the bugs, and also of rap- 
idly spreading the disease. These are Fungi, the former 
white and the latter grey. He described the method of 
spreading the disease. A few diseased bugs were captured. 
They were put in a large glass whose bottom was covered 
with damp sand. They were well supplied with green 
wheat. As many healthy bugs as could be captured were 
put in the jar. In thirteen days nearly every bug was dead. 
They had all caught Sporotrichum-Globuliferum. As demands 
came in for these bugs and three thousand demands had 
been made, a half-dozen dead bugs were put in a pill box, 
and the farmers were instructed to put two or three bun- 



78 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

dred bugs into the jar with the infected bugs. Within 
twenty-four hours every bug would catch the disease. They 
were all to be turned loose into the wheat fields. Within 
twelve days the field would be filled with the dead bugs. In 
about ninety per cent, the disease had been found highly 
effective. As long as there were any sick bugs the disease 
went on. In one case 10,000 died in nine days from the 
infection caught from one dozen dead ones. 

During the afternoon an excursion was had out into the 
farming country of the State of Kansas, This trip gave 
the members an opportunity to see the splendid resources of 
this section of the United States. 

Great herds of the finest cattle were seen on great pas- 
tures, and the country was evidently very rich in agricul- 
tural products. 

Dr. Daniels, Chairman of the Committee on Car sanita- 
tion read a very interesting report. He said that there 
was great room for improvement and suggested a more lib- 
eral UbC of rattan fittings for the cars instead of tapestry. 
He censured the railroad companies for not more properly 
caring for the public, as they allow the cars to remain often 
in a very unsanitary condition. Passenger cars should be 
thoroughly cleaned and renovated both before and after 
each trip. Especially should this be done where cars take 
long trips carrying emigrants. He also censured the pres- 
ent method of heating which made no provision for venti- 
lation. There were very few cars properly ventilated. He 
quoted from a report made by Dr. Horlbeck noting the 
great success of the Emerson method. By this method a 
car can be thoroughly ventilated as well as heated. Dr. Reid 
expressed the opinion that the whole matter was with the 
people, the trouble was that the people did not demand these 
things. If they demanded proper ventilation they would 
get it. 

Dr. Horlbeck then explained the progress made by the 
Emerson Car Company. He said that an entirely new car 
had been made with all of the appliances of the company. 
He had taken an experimental trip, and the air was contin- 



HealtJi Department 79 

uously chaDged. Not only was fresh air constantly put in the 
car but at the same time the air which had become foul was 
removed from the car. He said however, that none of the 
railroad companies seemed disposed to furnish fresh air to 
their passengers. It seemed that if the passengers could 
have a stove in the winter an an open window and ice water 
in the summer all was well. He spoke of the long trip from 
Charleston and two nights spent on the cars and each morn- 
ing a severe headache. It was to be expected. Breathing 
the expired air all night could not produce any other result. 
The only possible way seemed to be to educate the travel- 
ing public to demanding these things. 

Dr. Dundas, U. S. Vet. Inspector at Kansay City packing 
houses, read a paper on Animal Diseases. He spoke strongly 
against diseased cattle being shipped to market. As soon 
as a farmer finds his herd affected with tuberculosis, he im- 
mediately ships them off to market. He recommends 
constant inspection. He also recommended the police 
supervision of all milk dairies. He laid to the Jersey 
cow the blame of being most generally afflicted with 
tuberculosis. Dr. Bryce spoke of tuberculosis in milk, and 
said that this was the way that tuberculosis was trans- 
mitted, viz : through milk. Such being the case, he said 
that in Canada we never breed our milk cows, and in one 
city of great importance we never use a milch cow after she 
once goes dry, She is immediately sent to the butcher. It 
seems to me that in view of the startling fact that there are 
15,000,000 milch cows, and that there are from 5 to 10 per 
cent, affected with tuberculosis, that there should be a most 
careful and rigid inspection of all milk cows, as is due to 
the public 

Dr. Orevananos gave a very interesting report of the 
new organization of the Supreme Board of Health of Mexico. 
The system shows a most complete system of supervision. It 
was a grand and sweeping system, and showed that the gov- 
ernment of the Republic of Mexico were well in advance of 
the United States in these respects — inland and quarantine. 
This is of very recent origin. President Dias is deeply in- 



80 Mayor Bryants Annual Revieiu. 

terested in sanitary matters, and will see that every en- 
deavor is made to carry out the best sanitary precautions. 

During the evening the A.ssociation was entertained by 
the Commercial Club of Kansas City. Speeches of welcome 
and congratulation were made. 

Friday saw the end of the I9th annual meeting of the 
Association. Two important resolutions were passed. It 
was resolved as the sense of the Association that State and 
provincial inspection of the production of vaccine virus be 
established. 

The other was a resolution asking the general govern- 
ment to establish a Federal Department of Health, to have 
at its head a Secretary who shall be a Cabinet officer. 

The Association passed the following resolution : 

Resolved, That this Association will hold its meeting in 
1898 in the city of Chicago, and that so far as possible the 
occasion be made an International Congress of Hygiene 
and Public Health. 

Dr. Hewitt then read a paper on " The existing methods 
ot dealing with Emigrants as respects Infectious Diseases 
in England, and on English ships/' He spoke of the in- 
sufficient regulations of England, which were antiquated 
and bungling. He read a case of an English ship going to 
England and having had a case of small pox, and having 
passed an hour and a half at quarantine, and receiving a 
few ounces of sulphur fumes, and being given Pratique, 
small pox having broken out on the new voyage ; and all 
of this should never have happened. 

The Association listened to several other papers, one an 
interesting one from Dr. Bell, editor of the Sanitarian, on 
the new Vjaths. Free and public baths ha\^e been estab- 
lished in New York. 

By this method large numbers can be washed at the same 
time, 40 or 50, and all done in a very short time, occupying 
but a few minutes. Pipes run along a ceiling, and the 
pressure is put on overhead. The bathers stand in a nude 
state below, the water is made of any warmth required, 





JSIVE. 






























> 




884 


1885 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


1890 


1891 


Totals 


Causes of Di 


73 

0) 

o 
1 -J 


-2 


o 

§ 


S 


o 
o 
o 


^ 

2 
^ 


1 



'xi 


1 


.1 


1 


S 


s 




8 


op 


1 

1 
5 


S 




a 


































60 

84 
120 
548 
104 
115 
444 
8 
254 

54 
1203 

63 
257 

3314 

1358 


489 
111 
54 

226 




5 

""q 

2 

""21 

1 
27 
10 
74 

4 










8 

"Ts 
4 

1 

13 

""8 

2 

54 

2 


11 

5 

2 

30 

"23 

3 

110 

1 


2 

"15 
4 
3 
12 

""6 

1 

52 

5 

100 
37 


4 

..... 

26 
24 

"21 

6 

140 

1 

230 
193 


8 

""3 

1 
2 
12 

""'6 

1 
83 

2 

118 
43 


4 

*"l 

1 

1 

28 

"32 
5 

202 
2 

"276 
213 


5 

""'i 
'""5 

19 

""6 

'"48 
1 

85 
45 


-■- 

3 

14 
37 

"23 

4 

131 

213 
159 


5 

""2 
...... 

10 

""'3 

2 

1 

~97 
41 


9 

'""i 
""3 

18 

"'19 

4 

165 

3 

"222 
"203 


Scarlet Fever 

Diphtheria 


7 
4 
2 
2 

12 



9 
5 

37 
2 


2 
4 

17 

"26 
11 
69 

2 


■"16 

1 

19 

"m 

2 
51 
3 


■■"5 
1 

27 
26 

"44 
4 

108 
1 


Croup 


75 


Whoopinf? Cough 

Typhoid Fever 


303 

785 


Typhus Fever 


18 


Malarial Fevers 


461 


Puerperal Fever 

All Diarrhoea] Diseas 
Cerebro-Spinal Menii 
Yellow Fever.. 


140 

2570 

58 

27 


Totals 


150 


80 


143 

209 


115 
59 


216 

202 


110 
46 


187 
198 


5317 






Consumption 


212' 51 


4227 






















• 

















Death from Certatn Zymotic Diseases in Twentv-Seven Years — From 1865 to 1891 inclusive. 





18 


0.5 


180G 


1887 


isos" 


1SC9 


is-o 


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1891 Totals 


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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGEICULTURE, "l 

Weather Bureau, l- 

Charleston. S. C , Jan. 6th, ]892. j 



Annual Meteorological Summary foe the Year Ending December 31, 1891, of Charleston, S. C. 

-Compiled for the City Boai-a of Healtli.) 





1 Pressu 






Temperature. 


"^^^-^■^ 


^?S^ 


TATIOK. 


(Fn'-Te^n'tK;^, 


WIND. 


Number of Days. 




I 1 

i 

i i 

i 1 


1 


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1 


i 


Mean of^ 


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1 

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MONTHS. 

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si 


1 

5 


^ i ' 
Ijji 




1 


i 

1 


mmV'.,: 

IWm'l,".,' 


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'■^- :■:: : - ^: ,--::,-.. :--■;; ^ - > .: ;: :: ^;. :: ^■: ;■ ^:';:^i^ 

■ ::: :■,;:■ ■,.■•.::;::;-, i,,: :i :^ i^ ;- :,; :; ::: _' ; "^ -jS 

-■ ;'- ■' :.\-::3^::y;:'i 5^ ;:; ;^ H ?; ir !^- -:■ i^ ■: i:^'ii 

".-,: :- . . _. ::.■'-,_■; I-," )ii IM -i: .s2 sii -M! ]..,_• "Tm -.-j i.j .-,..5.10085 


36 

i 
i 

1 

30 


?-w 

siw: 

1:1 

n. k. 


I^w. 

f.•^^: 


.0 


I 

12 

14 
"*9l 


18 

i 

17 


2 
6 

I 
1 


1 

i 

5 
2 
5 




i 

2 
3 


13 

ii 
i 

8 
Hii 


1 

1 

1 

8 
2 

•60 



3 

5 
7 
2 

S 

1 
6 


1 

13 

i 
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S 

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J 
'I 
1? 

7 


n 

12 13 
1§ ^? 

Ii 


9 
jf 





t 
s 

11 









5 
1 


Means Z 
















57..J 


39.9 


5S.9 


a5.o 


82.9 


81.0 


*J5.50' 


..- 


J.3 


,5.1 


.02401 




N.E. 


»150 


•78 


.40 


.32 


«140|.103 


»129 


•23 



; October, 67.7 
n October U; 
1 the month o 



The last frost n 



a, 3.81 i 
Ltlon o] 
/embei 
I April 1 ; the first frost occurred o 



' 'vi> degrees, and for the monlh'— January, 49.9 degrees; F'ebruary, i 

:iiest temperature for the year, 95, July 4; I "" "-' "" --' 

y ; least monthly range, 2.5, in September; 
I cloudiness. 



, is 56.98 inches, and for t 
I October 21. 



monthly r 
nches; Febrn 



eaa daily r 
March, 4.0 



Health Department. 81 

depending on the season. It is a very great boon to the 
people of New York. 

The Association were the recipients of many hospitalities 
at the hands of the people of Kansas City; and to Dr. Lewis, 
the chairman of the local committee, are due the thanks of 
the body. Kansas City, situated in the centre of a vast 
and prosperous agricultural area, is a city of much impor- 
tance commercially and from a sanitary standpoint, and 
with the interest manifested in these matters must add a 
wholesome influence in the cause of human progress in the 
amelioration of suffering and disease. 

It is the province of such organizations as the American 
Public Health Association to keep alive and distribute the 
sacred fire of knowledge What has been an art has become a 
science. In the middle ages plague, small pox, etc., swept 
the world with fearful havoc ; pestilence, as then known, is 
now unknown ; small pox is rarely ever seen as an epi- 
demic, and yet sanitary science is but in its infancy. The 
day must soon come when diphtheria, typhoid fever, 
scarlatina, etc., etc., will be things of the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. B. HORLBECK, 

Health Officer, 



82 Mayor Bryants Annual Review, 



REPORT OF TIDAL DRAIN KEEPER. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1892. 
To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston-: 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit the followhig 
report of the proceedings of this department for the past year. 

Report of Tidal Drain Department from January ist., 
1 89 1, TO December 3 ist, 1891. 

For cleaning out Tidal Drains and carting mud from same, 

4,865 loads. Laborers paid for working in drain..$l,620 18 

Cartage on mud 881 87 

$2,502 05 

Cameron & Barkley's biil to date for rope, shovels, wick for 

lamps, oils, nails, &c 52 31 

C. J. Schlepegrell's bills to date for lumber, nails, &c., used 

in framing sand pit frames and covers 8 85 

John C. Beaird's bill to date for one dozen lamps used in 

drains 3 00 

J. F. Riley's bill to date for repairs to windlass 1 40 

Extra cartage during year on sand pit frames and covers... 6 58 

C. Seel for sharpening two saws 50 

Salary for Tidal Drain Keeper up to date... 1,000 00 

Salary for two hands up to date 728 00 

Total amount $4,302 69 

Very respectfully, 

M. HOGAN, 

Tidal Drain Keeper. 



Department of CJiarities. 83 



DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES. 

The institutions in this Department, the Orphan House, 
Shirras Dispensary, City Hospital, Alms House, Old Folks' 
Home, and Enston Home, continue to be conducted with 
the same care, and for the best interests of the poor and 
sick of our city. No city in the South, and but few in the 
country make such ample provision for the unfortunates 
in their midst as our city does. With the amount 
expended under the direction of the Board of Health for 
the city sick, our appropriations for the current year 
amount to the sum of fifty-seven thousand three hundred 
dollars. The faithful w^ork of the Boards of Commissioners 
and the officers of these institutions have long been 
recognized and appreciated by our citizens. 



THE CHARLESTON ORPHAN HOUSE. 



To the Hon. Mayor of Charleston, 8. C. : 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following annual 
report, viz : 

From the Committee on School, Library, Purveyance 
and Supervision, and Committee on Binding Out, with 
statements showing Receipts and Expenditures of the Insti- 
tution for the past fiscal year, 1891, up to December 31st, 
inclusive, with annexed statement of the Commissioners 
Trust Fund : 

Receipts. 

Amount received from interest on Public Fund $ 8,984 24 

Amount received from Commissioners' Trust Fund 3,111 55 

Balance from City Treasury 11,249 51 

$23,245 30 



84 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Expenditures. 

Amount expended from Public Fund as per monthly re- 
turns to City Council $ 18,933 75 

Amount expended for Physician's salary % 700 00 

For Insurance on House 500 00 — 1,200 00 

Amount expended from Commissioners' Trust 

Fund 3,111 55 

$23,245 30 

THE COMMITTEE ON SCHOOLS. 

/ 

The Committee to whom was confided the supervising of 

the school connected with the Charleston Orphan House, 
present the subjoined report : 

1891. 
Highest number on register during the year : 

Boys, 181— Girls, 111— Total 242 

Average attendance : 

Boys, 129— Girls, 109— Total 238 

Admitted : 

Boys, 12— Girls, 9— Total . 21 

Discharged : 

Boys, 14— Girls, 9— Total 23 

The sessions of the school have been conducted through- 
out the year with punctuality and regularity. 

The studies embrace Reading, Writing, Orthography, 
Arithmetic, (mental and practical), Common School and 
Physical Geography, Ancient and Modern History, Fa- 
miliar Science, Grammar, Vocal and Instrumental Music. 
In addition to these we have this year added Stenography 
and Type-Writing in the evening, which do not interfere 
with the other studies. 

The first class will soon have completed the course, and 
your committee are pleased to state that the boys and girls 
trained in the Orphan House are finding remunerative 
positions in banks and other institutions iu the city. 

The Kindergarten now numbers 81, but a class of 24 



Department of Charities. 85 

will shortly be advanced to the Primary Department. The 
class from the Kindergarten mentioned in last year's re- 
port has done excellent work, reflecting great credit not 
only on the Kindergarten training, but also on its present 
teacher. 

The entire School has maintained its usual standard. 
The reports of the past have been so full that there is but little 
left for your Committee to say ; they would, however, re- 
mind the Board that the Teachers not only faithfully per- 
formed their duties in school, but assist the Principal in 
every way they can in carrying on the other work of the 
Institution. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. W. WILLIAMS, ^ 

FRANCIS J, PELZER, 

B. A. MUCKENFUSS, V Committee. 

THEO. D. JERVEY, 

A. SIMONDS, 

Charleston, S. C, January 7, 1892. 



COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

Charleston, January 9th, 1892. 

The Committee on Library report that the Library con- 
tains 3,313 volumes. The children have drawn out and 
read during the year 3,200 volumes. There has been added 
in new books during the year 52 volumes. The children 
continue to take great interest in reading, and those too 
young to read have been read to by the efficient Librarian, 
who has discharged the duties with zeal and fidelity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H- H. DeLEON, Chairman. 
FRANCIS J. PELZER. 
ANDREW SIMONDS. 



86 Mayor Bryants Annual Revieu 

THE BINDING OUT COMMITTEE. 

The Binding Out Committee report that i^ children have 
been rec3ived into the House — 8 boys and 7 girls. 

Twenty-one children have been bound out — 12 boys and 
9 girls. 

Such as have been heard of are giving satisfaction, with 
one or two exceptions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEO. D. JERVEY, 
AUGUSTINE T. SMYTHE, 
A. F. C. CRAMER, 

Binding Out Committee. 
January 7, 1892. 



Department of Charities. 87 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PURVEYANCE CHARLESTON 
ORPHAN HOUSE. 



The Committee on Purveyance beg leave to submit their 
Annual Report of Expenditures for the Charleston Orphan 
House, for the year ending December 31, 1891, as follows, 
viz : 

LBS. COST. 

Fresh Meat 26,290 11,447 12 

Bacon, ham and other salt meats 6,398 618 38 

Coffee 418 81 47 

Cocoa Shells 1,233 60 09 

Bice 4,310 217 39 

Butter 1,320 364 12 

Cottolene 390 31 55 

Tea .,. 175 95 65 

Sugar 4,140 195 84 

Molasses 575 gals. 208 08 

Flour 18 bbls. Ill 40 

Irish Potatoes 25^ bbls. 80 20 

Sweet Potatoes 58^ bbls. 75 35 

Bread 57,750 loaves. 1,588 14— $5,174 78 

Expenses of cows furnishing 3,225 gals, milk 66173 

Corn and Peas, 156 \ bushels 176 41 

Small Groceries 516 10 

Soap, starch, etc 176 87 

Fuel, wood and coal 764 90 

Clothing, house linen, hats and shoes 1,895 17 

Books, stationery, etc 231 66 

Medicine, carbolic soap, disinfectants, etc 216 78 

House furnishing, garden seeds, etc 765 56 

Salaries and labor 5,562 09 

Incidental expenses, such as vegetables, picnic, oflScers' 
tables, extras for sick and other small items, too numer- 
ous to mention 950 00 

Kepairs 1,250 10 

Grist and meal 514J bushels 525 49 

$18,867 64 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. F. C. CRAMER. 
GEO. W. WILLIAMS. 



88 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

THE COMMITTEE ON REPAIRS. 

The Committee on Repairs would beg leave to report that 
owing to the liberality of Council they were enabled in 1890 
to paint the exterior walls of the house, which was much 
needed for some years. The interior is in fair condition, 
with the exception of the floors throughout the house, 
which have been laid for a number of years and require at- 
tention in many places. The committee would recommend 
early attention to this matter, either by adding cost of same 
to the appropriation asked for the year 1892, or asking the 
City Council for a special appropriation for that purpose. 

The boiler used for the house having been in use for a 
long time was condemned by the inspector and a new one 
was ordered and contracted for by the Board, for the 
cost of which the Honorable the City Council have been pe- 
titioned for a special appropriation. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by 

E. F. SWEEGAN. 
H. H. DeLEON. 
E. WILLIS. 

Committee on Repairs, 

Charleston, S. C, December 31, 1891. 



the committee on retrenchment and reform, 

To the Chairman and Board of Commissioners of the Charleston 
Orphan House : — 

The Committee on Retrenchment and Reform begs leave 
respectfully to report that in their opinion the management 
of the institution is now as economically conducted as 
possible, and they have no recommendation to make. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

AUGUSTINE T. SMYTHE. 
H. H. DeLEON. 
E. F. SWEEGAN. 

Committee^ 



Department of Charities. 89 

THE COMMITTEE ON IMPROVEMENT AND DISCIPLINE. 

The Committee on improvement and Discipline respect«« 
fully report that they cannot see where any improvement 
can be made in the discipline of the house. 

FRANCIS J. PELZER. 

GEO. W. WILLIAMS. 

E. WILLIS. 

H. H. DeLEON. 

E. F, SWEEGAN. 

Sunday School. 

The work of tho Sunday School has been uninterrupted — 
though we find great difficulty in obtaining teachers ; those 
now engaged in teaching, are, with but three exceptions 
from the School and House. 

Mr. Cook, the forriier Superintendent,left the city some time 
ago, and Mr. Knox, one of the teachers, has been filling his 
place faithfully ever since. Mr Miscally, an earnest and 
devoted teacher, has been with us for over 20 years. 

School opens at 9, and is continued for a little over an 
hour. 

Chapel, 

The Chapel has not been closed once during the year — 
the usual afternoon services having been conducted by the 
resident Clergy (who always cheerfully respond to the calls 
made upon them), and eleven visiting ministers. 

The Commissioners gratefully acknowledge these services. 

The music is still an attractive feature, and the pews in 
the Chapel reserved for visitors, are usually fully occupied, 
showing the continued interest of the citizens in this noble 
work. 

Sanitary, 

The Sanitary condition of the Institution is excellent, and 
the general health of the children remarkable. We have 
to record but one death— Edward Antibus, aged 13, who 
died after a few hours illness, Dec. 20th, of congestion of the 



90 Mayor Bryants Annual R 



evtew. 



brain. He was interred in the Children's Lot, at Magnolia 
Cemetery. 

A careful perusal of the foregoing full and interesting 
reports demonstrate that the high standard and character 
of this noble Institution has been fully maintained in every 
particular, and I deem it but just to render my testimony 
to the intelligent, faithful and devoted services of our Prin- 
cipal, who, with God's blessing, has achieved such benefi- 
cent results in the management of our Orphan House. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JACOB SMALL, 
Chairman of Board of Commissioners of 
Charleston Orphan House, 



Department of Charities. . 91 

ABSTRACT of the Receipts and Expenditures of the Private 
Fund of the Commissioners of the Charleston Orphan House, 
for the year ending December 31st, 1891. 

Dr. 

To balance in hand January 1, 1891 . % 807 50 

Cash received from interest on in- 

vestments $2,588 00 

Cash from rent of UfFerhardt Farm 250 00 2,848 00 





$3,655 50 


Cr. 




By Cash paid for Officers Salaries, &c.42,044 00 


Magnolia Cemetery and 




painting fence to Lot 


41 50 


Books for Library and 




Sunday-School and 




Papers 


60 98 


Pic-Nic 


141 00 


Marriage Donations . 


75 00 


Printing Centennial 




Reports ..... 


430 00 


Advertising .... 


20 78 


Typewriter,Books,&c. 




Instruction .... 


277 29 


Sundries 


21 00—3,111 55 


Balance 


543 95 




$ 3,655 50 



E. E. 

E. MONTAGUE GRIMKE, Treasurer, 
Examined and found correct. 

FRANCIS J. PELZER, ) ^ , , 

THEO. D. JERYEY, [ ^'''^' ^"^ "^''^'- 



92 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

LIST of Bonds, Stocks and other Securities, belonging to the 
Private 'Fund of the Commissioners of the Charleston Orphan 
House exhibited to us this first day of January, 1892. 



50 Bonds of the City of Charleston 4 per ct. $1,000 $50,000 
6 " " " " '' 500 3,000 

1 " " •* " '' for 100 

2 '' " Northeastern Kailroad Co. 

1st Mortgage, 8 per cent, of 500 each . 1,000 

1 Certificate of Consolidated Stock of the 

State of South Carolina 6 per cent for , . 4,500 

1 Certificate for 20 Shares Magnolia Ceme- 
tery Co. of 100 each 2,000 

1 Certificate for 3 Shares in the Bank of 

Charleston, N. B. A. of 100 each . . 300 

1 Title Deed to Six Lots in Magnolia Ceme- 
tery 

1 Certificate of Deposit for 1 Charleston 
and Savannah R. R. Bond for $500 . . 

1 Bond of the Savannah and Charleston 
R. R. Co. 150 . , , . . . . , 

FRANCIS J. PELZER, 



FRANCIS J. PELZER, 1^ . , 

THEO- D. JERVE Y. j ^^^' ^^ ^^^^^' 



Department of Charities. 93 



SHIRRAS DISPENSARY. 



T. Grange Sijnons, M. D.^ Treasurer, in account with the 
Trustees of the Shirras Dispensary. Cr. 

Jan. 1891. receipts. 

Jan'y 1. Amount brought forward (balance in 

bank,) $280 23 

Jan'y. 13. Interest on City 4 per cent. January 

Coupons 330 00 

Feb. 2. Rent of House Meeting Street, Jan'y. '91 50 00 
Mch. 3. " " " " Feb. " 50 00 

Apl. 1. " " " " Mch. " 50 00 

May 30. " " " " Apl. May 100 00 

July 7. Interest on City 4 per cent. Bonds, July 

Coupons 330 00 

Aug. 19. Rent of House Meeting St., June, July 100 00 
Oct. 19. " " " ''■ Aug., Sep. 100 00 

Dec. 4. " " " " Oct., Nov.. 100 00 

11,490 23 

EXPENDITURES 

Repairs and Improvements to House, 

Jas. Preston ^112 50 

J. C. Johnson, Janitor, and washing 

towels , 8 50 

Dr. P. G. DeSaussure, by vote of Trus- 
tees 100 00 

Dr. Manning Simons, by vote of Trustees 100 00 
Dr. J. L. Dawson. Jr., by vote of Trustees 100 00 
Dr. J. J. Edwards, by vote of Trustees... 100 00 

J. C. Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

Wm. Johnson & Co., 1 ton coal and \ 

cord wood , 8 15 

J. C. Johnson, Janitor and broom 8 10 

H. W. Hummel, prescriptions and drugs 10 38 

World-Budget Co., advertisement 10 00 

C. & E. L. Kerrison & Co., 4 doz., towels 10 

J. C. Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

E. R. Cowperthwaite, instrument case... 18 00 

Daily Sun, advertisement 10 00 

News and Courier, advertisement 10 00 



Jan. 


1891, 


Jan'y. 


3. 


Jan'y. 


3. 


Jan'y. 


15. 


Jan'y. 


15. 


Jan'y. 


15. 


Jan'y. 


15. 


Feb. 


3. 


Feb. 


11 


Mch. 


2. 


Mch. 


5 


Mch. 


11. 


Mch. 


15. 


Apl. 


2. 


Apl. 


2. 


Apl. 


5. 


Apl. 


9. 



94 Mayor Bryants Annual Revieiv. 

Apl. 13. G.W,Aimar& Co., instruments 100 45 

May 2. J. C. Johnson, Janitor and gas fixtures.. 9 10 
May 19. Edward Perry & Co., printing cards and 

Circulars 6 10 

June 3. J. C. Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

June 4. H. W. Hummel, prescriptions 24 00 

June 6. Eichardson & Sons, lock-work 100 

June LI. James Preston, doors and painting...... 11 50 

July 3. J. C Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

July 14. R. M. Marshall & Bro., on account pur- 
chase 4 per cent. Bond T^o. 87 for 1^500 350 00 

Aug. 3. J, C. Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

Aug, 19. R. M. Marshall & Bro., balance due 60 00 

Aug. 31. Aimar & Co., instruments 1 50 

Aug, 31. Morris, repairs to water-works 2 75 

Sept. 1. J. C. Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

Sept. 3, H. W. Hummel, prescriptions, etc 19 88 

Oct. 2. J. C. Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

Oct. 3. Charleston Water Works, 1 j^ear to Sep- 
tember, '92 11 40 

Nov. 3. J. C. Johnson, Janitor, etc , 8 50 

Dec. 3. J. C. Johnson, Janitor, etc 8 50 

Dec. 7. H. W. Hummel, prescriptions, etc 15 66 

$1,296 77 

Balance in bank 193 47 



1,490 23 



Department of Charities. 



95 



CITY HOSPITAL. 

Charleston, S. C, March SI, 1892. 
To the Honorable Mayor of the City of Charleston: 

Dear Sir : — Now ask to hand you under the Annual 
Report of City Hospital to 31st December, J 891. Table A. 
shows 1,171 patients treated during the year. B, that 96 
patients remained in Hospital, 31st December. 

C That the expenses for year $18,903 60 

Earnings 4,677 41 

Assets 3,191 00 

I cannot do less than to call your attention to the serious 
and growing evil of forcing the insane into the Hospital, 
to be ultimately sent to asylum, at expense of the city, 
instead of the county, and ask that the city attorney be re- 
quested to adjust ii, so the county will send the insane to 
Columbia as provided by law, and not to City Hospital 
except in extreme cases. 

I am, with great respect, 

E. WILLIS. 
Chairman Hospital Board. 
Hon. J. F. FiCKEN, Mayor. 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1891. 
TABLE A. 

Free. Pay. 



Patients W. 

In Hospital January 1, 1891 

Admitted during year 363 

Total admitted and treated 


C. 
516 


Total. 

879 


W. 

138 


C. 

"si 


Total. 
219 


Grand 
Total. 

73 
1,098 

1,171 



TABLE B. 

Showing Patients Discharged and Died during Year. 



White. 

Treated, Free and Pay— Table A 

Discharged.. 457 

Died 43 

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1891 



Colored. 



459 
116 



9161 
159/ 



Total. 
1,171 

1,075 
96 



96 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



TABLE C. 

Patients Admitted during Year. 
Free. 



Pay. 



City 

State at large 

Berkeley County. 

N. E. R KCo 

Colleton County 

Italian Consul 

Williamsburg County 

St. Andrews Phos. Co 

Chas. & Sav. K E. Co 

Charleston County 

Consul Sweden and Norway 

Etiwan Phos. Co 

H. B. M., Consul 

S. C. R K. Co 

Charleston M. & M. Co 

Foreign 



W. 

363 



Totals. 



563 



C. 
516 



516 



W. 

51 

19 

11 
1 
1 
3 
1 

*i 

9 



30 
5 

10 

^36 



C. 

4 
21 
34 

9 



83 1.098 



TABLE D. 

Total number Patients admitted 

On Certificate of Physicians 

Cases of Emergency 

Order of Mayor, Faculty and Police 

Personal application and pay 



1,098 

.566 
.109 
.189 
.234 
1,098 



TABLE E. I 

Admitted on Physicians Certificates. 



From Health District No. 1 

" No. 2. 

No. 3. 

*' " No. 4, 



w. 


C. 


133 


108 


24 


46 


52 


50 


40 


123 



Total. 

231 

70 

102 
163 

566 



TABLE F. 

Number of days treatment, Free Patients 22,905 

Number of days treatment, Pay Patients 4,403 



27,308 



Average number of days, Free Patients 26^^^ days. 

Average number of days, Pay Patients SOyVcr days. 



Maximum number in Hospital on any one day 107 

Minimum number in Hospital on any one day 51 



107 



51 



Department of Charities, 



97 



TABLE G. 

Collections and Earnings, for 1891. 



COLLECTIONS. 



EARNINGS. 



Berkeley County 

Chas. & Sav. K. R. Co 

North-Easteru R. R Co 

So. Ca. R. R. Co 

Charleston County 

British Consul 

Consul Sweden and Norway. 

Italian Consul 

Coffins, etc., etc 

Pay Patients 

Williamsburg County 

Colleton County 

Charleston M. & M. Co 

Etiwan Phos. Co 

St. Andrews Phos. Co 

Lunatics 



1,583 30 

231 00 

276 00 

257 00 

15 00: 

260 OOJ 

28 OOi 

33 00, 

134 811 

1,105 80 



41 20 
3,960 11 



1,298 30 

220 00 

274 00 

299 00 

232 00 

448 00 

23 00 

33 00 

134 81 

1,519 00 

64 00 

38 30 

69 00 

15 00 

10 00 



4,677 41 



DR. 

January 1st, 1891. 

Cash on hand at this date % 185 78 

Collections 1891 3.960 11 

Appropriation 1891 16,000 00 

Deficit 512 95 



20,658 84 



CR. 

January 1st, 1891. 

Balance due City Treasurer $ 1,755 24 

Cost of Hospital for 1891 :— 

For supplies I 2,030 68 

For advertising 18 17 

For repairs 726 16 

For subsistance 7,289 36 

For medicines... 825 27 

For nursing 7,690 31 

For insurance 55 00 

For lunatics 268 65 

$ 18,903 60 



$ 20,658 84 



98 • Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Assets January, 1892. 

Berkeley County | 985 00 

N. E. R. R. Co 102 00 

H. B. M. Consul...... 188 00 

Charleston County 232 00 

Certificates received 584 55 

S. C. R. R. Co 79 00 

Charleston M. & M. Co 69 00 

Colleton County 42 00 

Pay Patients 908 50 

$ 3,190 05 



F. KRESSEL. ) 

HENRY SCHACHTE. V City Hospital 

S. V. STEWART. J 

Finance Committee. 



THE ALMS HOUSE. 

Office of Commissioner of City Alms House^ \ 
Charleston, S. C, January 12th, 1892. i 

To the Honorable Mayor and 

Aldermen of the City of Charleston, S. C: 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed please find Master's report of the 
Alms House, for the fiscal year ending 31st December, 1891, 
as presented to the Board of Commissioners, and by them 
ordered to be sent to your Honorable body. 

It affords us pleasure to state that the amount necessary 
for the maintenance of the Alms House, for the past year, 
ha.s been |8,094.12, leaving a balance of $5.88 to credit of 
appropriation. 

The public transportation account I have, by careful at- 
tention to the same, examined each case or applicant, and 
feel that all deserving applicants have received transporta^- 
tion to their homes, notwithstanding the fact that a large 
number of applicants have been sent to me by other asso- 
ciations of charity. 

I report the amount expended for this account for the 
fiscal year ending December S'.st, 1891, to be $399.11, 



Departinent of Charities. 99 

leaving a balance of $100.89 to the credit of the appropria- 
tion. All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Very respectfully, 

"^ EDW. S. BURNHAM, 

Chairman B. C. A. H, 



Charleston, S. C, January 11th, 1892. 
To the Board of Commissioners of Alms House : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to present for your con- 
sideration, in accordance with the rules, the following re- 
port for the fiscal year ended December 31st, 1891. 

There were admitted into the Institution during the year 
fifty-three persons, classified as follows : 

Admitted. 

Males 27. Females 25. Children 1. Total 53 

Natives of South Carolina 23 

Natives of Ireland 22 

Natives of Germany , 4 

Natives of Switzerland 1 

Natives of Pennsylvania 1 

Natives of North Carolina 1 

Natives of Italy 1 

Total 53 

Discharged. 

Males 19. Females 12. Children 1. Total.... 32 

Natives of South Carolina 18 

Natives of Ireland .....11 

Natives of North Carolina 1 

Natives of Germany 1 

Natives of Eussia 1 

Total 32 

Transferred to Hospital. 

Males ..10. Females 9. Total 19 

Natives of South Carolina 9 

Natives of Ireland 8 

Natives of Germany 1 

Natives of Italy 1 

Total 19 



100 Mayor Bryants Annual Revieiu. 

Deaths, 

Males 2. Females 4. Total ...g 

Natives of Ireland 5 

Natives of Italy 1 



Total. 



Inmates of the House. 

Males 26. Females 45. Total 71 

Natives of Ireland 31 

Natives of South Carolina 24 

Natives of Germany., 7 

Natives of New Jersey • 1 

Natives of Pennsylvania 1 

Natives of Canada 1 

Natives of Virginia 1 

Natives of Georgia 1 

Natives of Russia I 

Natives of Sweden 1 

Natives of Switzerland , 1 

Natives of France 1 

Total 71 

Out-Door Pensioners, 

White Males 4. Females 33. Children 39. Total 76 

Colored Males 12. Females 36. Children .....47. Total 95 

171 
The number of rations drawn weekly by Out-Door Pensioners 132 

Expenditures 
The total amount expended during the year $8,094 12 

The same care has been taken of the inmates, most of 
whom are persons quite aged and utterly incapable of help- 
ing themselves, as heretofore. 

They have been supplied with substantial and wholesome 
food and raiments ; everything has been done to make them 
comfortable. 

The sick have likewise been attended to and nursed with 



Department of Charities. 101 

care. The physician in charge has been prompt in respond- 
ing to m}^ calls. 

Such of the inmates who were able were required to as- 
sist in the work of the House. 

The average number of persons in the House during the 
year were seventy^three. 

Permit me gentlemen, to say in conclusion, that I have 
endeavored to perform the duties of my office with fidelity 
and impartiality, and assure you that since my official con- 
nection with the House it has been my aim and purpose, 
and I have at all times endeavored to act in the interest of 
the Institution, and to execute the orders of your Board. 

I am not unmindful of your kind consideration, and 
thank you most heartily for the same. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. G. FRAZER, 
Master City Alms House. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM 
ENSTON HOME FOR 1891. 



Charleston, S. C , January 27, 1892. 
To the Honorable the City Council of Charleston : 

The Trustees beg leave to report, that the affairs of the 
Home have progressed satisfactorily during the past year ; 
the general health of the village continues good, no case 
of local sickness occurrnig during the year. 

There were three deaths in 1891 ; one between fifty and 
sixty, one between sixty and seventy, and one over eighty 
years of age ; one was admitted with an incurable disease, 
and one died of old age. 

The cottages are all in good order, and as a general con- 
dition are neatly kept; the residents express themselves 
pleased with the accommodations. 



102 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

The Memorial Hall is kept supplied with magazines and 
newspapers, and it is intended to form a library there. The 
main apartment is nicely furnished, and is used for reli- 
gious purposes at the pleasure of residents. 

Herewith the Trustees send their annual financial state- 
ments, which show that, with close economy, the income 
has been sufficient for necessary current expenses. 
Respectfully submitted, 

WM. A. COURTENAY, President. 



WM. ENSTON HOME. 

Cash Receipts and Expenditures from January 1, 1891, to 
December 31, 1891. 

RECEIPTS. 

From interest, &c % 3,294 90 

New cottages Account : Annuitant's Fund surplus for 1891. 2,857 89 

Sales Savannah Bonds $10,200 00 

Sales Charleston 4 per cent. Bonds 7,515 00 

From Personal Bond on account 5,000 00 22,715 00 

Cash December 31, 1890. 27 40 

128,895 19 

EXPENDITURES. 

Expenses of Administration |2,588 88 

Repairing subsoil drain 279 27 

Fuel and Lights 739 83 

Investment Colleton Bonds $5,000 00 

Investment Marion Bonds 9,750 00 

Investment Winnsboro Bonds, and interest from 

April 1, 1891 7,376 63 

Investment Bills Receivable. 2,857 89 24,984 52 

Balance cash on hand 302 69 

$28,895 19 



Department of Charities. 103 

ASSETS. 

$14,500 Charleston 4 per cent. Bonds, costing $10,992 77 

5,000 Colleton 7 percent. Bonds, costing 5,0f0 00 

10,000 Marion 6 per cent. Bonds, costing 9,750 00 

15.000 Personal Bonds. 7 per cent, costing 15,000 00 

7,000 Winnsboro Bonds, 7 percent, costing.... 7,035 00 
Cash 302 69 48,080 46 

New Cottages account : 

$11,000 Charleston 4 per cent Bonds $9,058 75 

State Stock 2,902 53 

Bills Receivable 2,857 89 14,819 17 

$62,899 63 

WM. A. COURTENAY, President. 

E. E. Charleston, December 31, 1891. 



WM. ENSTON ANNUITANTS FUND. 

Cash Transactions of Wm. A. Courtenay, Jno. F. Ficken and 
W. E. Butler, Trustees, from January 1, 1891, to December 
31, 1891. [Statement No. 9.) 

Jan'y. To balance cash on hand $ 7 21 

To Interest on State Stock, January and 

July $ 6,792 00 

To Interest on City Bonds, January, 

($100,000) ; 2,000 00 

To Interest on City Bonds, J uly. ($85,000). 1,700 00 

To Interest on Camden Bonds 450 00 10,942 00 

March. To Sale $15,000 City Bonds, net 12,096 86 

$23,046 07 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Annuities for 1891 $7,500 00 

To Expenses of Administration 50 35 7,550 35 

To Trustees Commissions on Keceipts..$10,942 00 
To Trustees Corn's on Disbursements... 7,550 35 
To Trustees Com's on Disbursements... 2,857 89 

$21,350 24 at 2^ % 533 76 



104 Mayor Bryant Annual Review. 

To pd. Trustees Wra. Enston Home, surplus 1891.. 2,857 89 

To Investment Sumter Bonds 12,000 00 

To balance cash on hand 104 07 

$23,046 07 

ASSETS. 

$113,200.00 State Stock, (South Carolina,) costing $115,333 42 

85,000.00 Charleston 4 per cent. Bonds, costing 63,487 51 

12,000.00 Sumter Bonds, costing 12,000 00 

7,500.00 Camden Bonds, costing 7,500 00 

Cash 104 07 

$217,700.00 $198,425 00 

WM. A. COURTENAY, 
JNO. F. FICKEN, 
W. ENSTON BUTLER, 

Trustees. 
E. E. Charleston, December 31, 1891. 



Fire Department. 105 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

This department continues to he most efficient. The 
addition of a chemical engine would be a decided im- 
provement. The report of the Firemasters is most elab- 
orate, and gives in full the work of the department during 
the year : 



Office Board of Fire Masters, 
Charleston, S. C, January 1st 1892 



^ } 



To the Hon. the Mayor and, City Council of Charleston : 

The Board of Fire IMasters respectfully submit the opera^' 
tions of this Department for the year 1891, and its condi- 
tion at this date, as contained in the annexed statements, 
which will show : 

The force of the Department. 

Condensed expenses from 1st January to 31st December, 
1891. 

Summary of expenses by companies from January 1st to 
December 31st, 1891. 

Record of fires for the year 1891. 

Inventory of property 31st December, 1891. 

Comparative statement of property at risk, insurance and 
loss, FRANCIS S. RODGERS, 

Chairman Board Fire Masters. 

Force of the Fire Department, December 31ST, 1891 

103 Officers and Men. 
7 Steam Fire Engines in service, 
2 Steam Fire Engines in reserve. 
2 Steam Fire Engines condemned. 
8,934 Feet of Hose. 

2 Fuel Wagons. 

3 Alarm Bells, and a complete system of Fire Alarm Telegraph. 
2 Hook and Ladder Trucks. 

7 Hose Carriages. 
31 Horses, four of which are unfit for service 



106 Mayor Bryants Annual Heview. 

Condensed Expenses of the Fire Department from 
January ist to December 31ST, 1891. 

Pay Roll 136,031 92 

Grain aod Hay for 30 Horses 3,442 23 

Wood and Coal 1,049 07 

Oil, Wasteand Supplies 141 86 

Repairs and Improvements to Apparatus 514 94 

Repairs and Improvements to Houses and Towers. 214 19 

Repairs to Harness 66 02 

New Hose— 500 feet Leading Hose, $287.50; IS^^a feet 

Suction, 159.06 346 56 

Horseshoeing 274 64 

Veterinary 30 92 

Printing and Stationery 10 50 

3 Horses 725 00 

Repairs and Improvements to Fire Alarm Tele- 
graph : 

600 Zincs, 1192.00 ; 50 Binding Posts, |2.50 |194 50 

300 Coppers, $39.00 ; Pins, $3.00 ; Barrels and 

Freight, $10.25 52 25 

9 Bbls. Blue Stone, 4,087 lbs. at 5^0 224 78 

50 Poles and Freight, $89.00;; Labor, 22.75 Ill 75 

Arms and Box Boards, $16.35 ; Magnets, 

$15.00 31 35 

Lag Bolts, Staples, Nails, Rope & Hatchet 17 53— 632 16 
Stable Utensils,. 95 41 

Incidental Expenses op the Fire Department. 

Repairs to Heaters, $152.56 ; Repairs to Roof 

and Gutters, $129,75 282 31 

Rent of Telephone, $60.00 ; Saw Dust. $60.37... 120 37 
Repairs to Wagon, $59.00 ; Rent of Lot, $37.60.. 96 60 
Pipe Holder, $35.00 ; Suction Collars, $24 50 59 50— 558 78 

$44,134 20 

By Sale of 2 Horses ....$125 00 , 

By Sale of 98 feet Hose 39 20 

By Sale of 100 Brackets 4 00— 168 20 

By Sale of Old Metal.... 60 44 

By Sale of Manure and Bags 60 37- 120 81— 289 01 

$43,845 19 



Fire Department. ' 1 07 

Comparative Statement of Property at Bisk, Insurance and Loss. 



03 




Property at 
Risk. 


Insurance. 


Loss on 
Real Estate 


Loss on 
Personal 
Property. 


Total Loss. 


1882 
1888 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


34 

72 
43 
50 
57 
43 
35 
52 
38 
54 

478 


$ 293,500 00 

1,229,885 41 

412,163 00 

394,802 ]4 

431,774 43 

1,191,577 00 

1,256,991 88 

941,975 00 

521,275 00 

1,549,725 00 

18,223,668 86 


% 106,205 00 

1,112,350 00 

305,238 54 

251,100 00 

356,024 43 

1,125,025 00 

1,241,685 00 

898,555 00 

341,850 00 

1,420,350 00 

$7,158,382 97 


1 12,539 09 
50,261 19 
31,665 00 

6,103 80 
46 325 55 

5,081 00 
17,127 00 
17,413 00 
16,431 00 
12,086 50 


$ 20,087 52 
243.699 11 
70,494 98 
22,359 79 
62,216 09 
42,455 17 
86,042 88 
50,475 00 
31,125 00 
27,928 17 


% 32,626 61 

293,960 30 

102. L59 98 

27,463 59 

108,541 64 

47,536 17 

103,169 88 

67,888 00 

47.556 00 

40,014 67 




$ 214,033 13 


% 656,883 71 


% 870,916 84 



Average for Ten Years. 

Property at Risk $822,366 88 

Insurance 715,838 29 

Loss on Real Estate % 21,403 31 

Loss on Personal Property 65,688 38 

Total Loss $ 87,091 69 



108 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



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Feb. 

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March 

March 

March 

March 

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April 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

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June 

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July 

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94 



424 

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524 
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818 



S. !S. Yess, 



Occupant or Owner of 
Personal Property 



s! W. Coi'i;,„„ 

No Ma*^"®- 

16 Mazyc 
Wo. 7 W^* 
No. 3 Lin 
562 King ^• 
Cotton F^"' 
119 Smith!"" 
S. S. Sunfj— 
C. &S. R.'" 
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69 Bogard 
512 Calhoun t 
868 Is Pitt Str 



o52 
85 
818 
222 
526 
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123 
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185 
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164 
838 
625 
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486 
828 
618 
615 
616 
615 
615 
615 
615 
614 
181 
85 
361 

Alarm 
181 
154 
163 
84 

Alarm 
135 
838 
833 
868 
514 



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162 Line S 
17 Frankli 
17 Friend i 
C. & S. R. 
44 Klizabe 



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Ch'y 



C. R. R 

8 Archdah 
News & C( 
69 Cooper 
16 Inspect! 
Academy 
15 Alexan( 
Bagging F 
101 King " 
Decoratiorj 
Arch, Brogfi .^jr 
401 King Slets 
JNo. 1 Desp( 
No. 2 Desp 
No. 3 Desp 
No. 5 Desp 
No. 6 Desp 
No. 8 Desp< 



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Captain and Crew. 
Miss Etta Kelly. 
Various Colored Families, 
P. O'Neill. 
George M. Lavaek. 
Dunneman & AUway. 
C. L. Schmencke. 
Cotton t actory Co. 
Unoccupied. 
Captain and Crew. 
Atlantic Coast Line. 

Welch. 

Mrs. S. C. Black and Others. 

Wm. Bargqmann. 

S. C. R. R. Co. 

Annie Ehney. 

J. C. H. Claussen. 

W. L. & J. Smith. 

F. Murphy & R. G. Dun & Co. 

Martha Ann Brown. 

M. Levy and Others. 

Ross. A. Smith. 

Atlantic Coast Line. 

Howell Jones and Others. 

s. c. r.'r.' Co.' 

J. E. Martin. 

News & Courier Co. 

Wm. Coles. 

Geo. Simmons. 

W. T. Keogb and Others. 

Unoccupied. 

Bagging Factorj' Co. 

Colored People. 

C. Eliiis & Co. 



i9 to 25 Ans 
120 Rutledg 

120 Meeting earth 
145 Meeting 



Ch'y 



nn. 
-m. 
•ra. 



181 St. Phil 
Palmer M({ 
42 Broad S" 
Pavilion H ,ios'n 
14 Princess 
48 Beautairet 



1. L. Mintz. 
Various Persons. 
Geo. Gregory. 
Wm, Bee. 
James Edwards. 
M Edwards. 
Fanny Rutledge. 



I. A. Goldsmith. 
Geo. Lucas. 
L. W. Bicaise A Co. 
C. H. Chapman 



Henry Fields 

Palmer Mfg. Co. 

Hibernia Savings Insti. & Others 

OppedebeckjGaillard and Others 

Various Persons. 

J. B, Mushington. 



Total Number of Alarms. 



Marine Loss 

All other Losses.. 



108 



Mayor Bryants Annual Meuiew. 



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Record of Fires for Twelve Months, Ending 31ST DECEMr.Ei), 189 r 



ll I 



Real Estate. 



) I ^„„ -„ ■ Loss (jn 
|Rel^.lsra1e.:p^---'. 



.Tan. 
Jan. 

Feb! 



7 12.55 p. 
10 12.25 p. 
li 10.48 p. 



Feb. 
Feb. 



July 
July 

Sept. 



94iS. S. Yesso, 1 Soutlioi 
424 8. W. Cor. VVeutworl 

i>13No Magazine 

31316 Mazyck 

524 jNo. 7 Washington s 
148 No. 3 Lluguard Stre, 

74 662 King Street 

713 Cotton Factory 

aiJ 119 Smith .street - 

154|s.S. Sunshine, Uniui 

526 C. & B. K. R. Yard 

528C. &. S. R. B. Yard,,, 

532 America Street 

343 30 Butledge street. ,,, 
3»3 King and PrlDcesK ,-i 

75 s. C. R. R. Yard 

813 69Bocard Street 



16 Inspection Street 
Academy of Music, 
15 Alexander street 

Bagging Factory 

101 King Street 

Decoration C. Elias . 
Arch. Broad and Ki 

401 King Street 

^o. 1 Despoites roil 
No. 2 Desportes Con 
No. 3 Desportes Con 
No. Desportes Coo 
No. 6 Desportes Con 
No, 8 Desportes Cou 



500,00000 
500 00 
•lOO.OOO 00 300,000 00 
8,000 00 



1,000 00|., 

"ssiooo'i 

1,0,'-" ■ 
15,01 



350 00 

20 00 

200 00 

1,500 00 

iom 

i;250 



) Accident..., 
Accident.... 

1 Unknown . 

) Accident,... 

) Accident..,. 

i Accident.... 

» Accident..,. 
; 00 Accident.... 
Occident..,. 
Defective I 
Accident..., 
Accident.. . 




1,000 00 

"iii'Jsbooo 

SUO 00 
10,000 00 



300 no I 

oOO Ool 
100 00 



25 00 
10000 
50 00 

iMwl 

1. 

0,300 OOi 
"i".504"Sl 



Personal Property 



Various Colored Famllii 
P. O'Neill. 
George M. Lavaek. 
Dunneman & AUway. 
r. L. Schmencke. 
Cotton p actory Co. 
Unoccupied. 
Caplain and Crew. 



Iiy & R. G. Dun &Co. 
Ann Brown. 
■ and Others. 



Accident. 
Accident .. 



Accident 

Trash in Yard. 
Delective Flue. 



inknown.. 
Unknown .. 
Unknown.. 



Howell Jones a 



Geo. ( 

W. T. Keogh and Others 

Unoccupied. 



go« 



C. Ellas & Co. 



I. L. Mint/,. 
Various Persons. 
Geo. Gregory. 
Wm. Bee. 
James Edwards. 
M Edwards. 
Fanny Rutiedge. 



Kal.se Alar 
False Alar 
false .'Vlar 



,.5.50 OOI.\coldent ., 
2.58 00 Unknown 
20 OO.Stove Expios'i 
10 00; Lamp- " 

Hky iBocket 

False Alarm 



Oppedebeck,Gaillard and Others 



1,. 549,725 00l$ 1,420,350 OP'S 12,086 50 $ 27,928 17||_40;014J7_ 



Totnl Number of Ala 



Fire Department. 



109 






5j 



Si 

s 



.r 









.-^ 



til 



r^^ 
^ 



•l^'jox 


$3,384 96 

4,591 99 

4,516 41 

4,451 26 

4,475 08 

4,502 17 

4,571 00 

4,600 52 

3,591 13 

629 26 

1.723 44 

]54 93 

76 38 

2,865 67 


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Mill 


68S0S_ 
5S 
00 s 


35 

i 

2 


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-9AOjdrax pu-B saiBda'a 


56 19 

77 25 
20 90 
23 31 
56 05 

96 35 

16 00 

1 10 

6 93 

""76"38 


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$3,384 96 
4,019 52 
4,007 70 
4,001 83 
4,018 52 
4,010 63 
4,017 34 
4,012 02 
3,319 44 
360 00 
879 96 


1! 
i 




Chief, Assist's and Clerk 

Engine No, 1 

Engine No. 2 

Engine No. 3 

Engine No. 4 

Eneine No. 5 


CO 


£ 


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Fire Alarm Telegraph 

superintendent of Horses 

Reserve Engines 

Department— General Use 


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110 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The faithful and intelligent work of the head of this 
department speaks for itself. His long connection with the 
police force (extending over twenty years) and familiarity 
with the service, coupled with his high, personal character, 
has produced the best results. Though extra policemen 
had to be employed, owing to sickness, the expenses of the 
department were kept within the appropriation, and there 
was a balance to its credit of $1,784.76 at the end of the 
vear. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE, 

Central Station Office Chief of Police, ) 
Charleston, S. C, January, 1892. / 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Coimcil of the City of 
Charleston : 

I respectfully submit my Fifth Annual Report as Chief 
of Police for the fiscal year ending December 31st, 1891. 

The force has been maintained during the year at its full 
strength, viz : 

One Chief. Four Line Sergeants. Two Daymen. 

TJaree Lieutenants. Three Detectives. Three Drivers. 

One Electrician. Eighty Privates. ^ 

Two Orderly Sergeants. Two Gate Sentinels. 

During the latter part January, and up to the 15th Feb- 
ruary, the Police force suffered from a serious attack of 
LaGrippe, placing on an average twenty Policemen on the 
sick list from that cause alone. Eight special Police were 
added to the roll, doing duty to February 15th, and paid 
from the Police appropriation ; since then the health of the 



Police Department. Ill 

Department until December was very good, when the force 
was again afflicted from the same cause. 

I regret to report, that on the night of October 11th, 
Private Eanes was shot and killed by Private Quinlivan ; 
also report the death of Private Leddy, one of the oldest 
and most esteemed members of the force, at his residence, 
October 31st. 

Twenty privates and three drivers were discharged for 
cause, and twenty-two privates resigned. The vacancies 
were filled as they occurred. 

The city has been exceptionally quiet the past year. The 
total number of arrests for all causes was 3,301, a slight 
increase over the previous year. 

Amount of fines imposed..., $8,331 00 Paid $4,605 00 

Amount of fines imposed in 1890 7551 00 Paid . .. 4,346 50 

Increase $780 00 $259 50 

The Police, Signal and Telephone Service has been kept 
up, and maintained very economically and its efficiency 
improved. 

During the year one extra Police Telephone box was 
placed at the corner of Line and Payne streets, costing for 
box, extra wire, poles and labor, $200. 

Sections 465, 466, 467, 468, 469, 470 and 471 of the City 
Ordinances, as ratified by Council February 10th, 1891, was 
practically put into force on Monday, March 9th, and dis- 
continued April 9th, during which time 104 dogs were cap- 
tured and disposed of as follows ; 79 killed, '24 redeemed. 
1 escaped. 

On June 1st an order was given to re-open the Dog 
Pound. Every effort was made to obtain a suitable dog 
catcher, by advertisement and otherwise. No one could be 
induced to accept the position. In consequence the pound 
was closed; and no further action taken, except to Section 
470, whicli has been enforced to the present time. 

Great improvements have been made to the quarters, by 



112 Mayor Bryants Annual Bevieiv. 

making closets for clothing, the whole building kept in re- 
pair, and everything paid for out of the appropriation for 
the Department, and leaving a balance to credit of $1,784.76 
on December 31st, 1891. 

Yours respectfully, 

JOSEPH GOLDEN, 

Chief of Police. 



Police Department 



113 



Report of the Chief of Police to the Honorable Mayor and City 
Council of Charleston, showing the Number of Persons Ar^ 
rested in the City of Charleston during the Year Ending 
December J ist, iSgi, and the cause of their arrest. 






* A, 




o 


3 
^ 




For- 
ucted 
f Po- 

time 


nt of 
osed a 
Court 




2 


o3 


13 


Amount of 
feitures ded 
from pay o 
lice for lost 


Amou 
imp 
lice 


a 




S 
O 

S 

<1 


Eh 



c3 d CO 



1st quarter 
2d •' 
3d 
4tli " 



$1,456 00 
],993 00 
3,038 00 
1,844 00 



$ 902 00 

1,2] 8 00 

1,552 00 

933 00 



$ 902 00 

1,218 00 

1,552 00 

933 00 



$8,331 00 $4,605 00 $4,605 00 $1,549 79 $75 50 



I 713 
268 
181 
384 



42 25 

18 50 

11 50 

3 25 



OFFENCES. 



Applied for Lodgings 

Assault 

Assault, Aggravated 

Assault with intent to kill 

Arrested on Telegram 

Breach of the Peace 

Breach of Trust 

Burglary ... 

Burglary and Larceny 

Burglar Killed 

Careless Driving 

Carrying Concealed Weapons 

Car Breaking and Larceny 

Cruelty to Animals 

Disorderly House 

Disorderly Conduct 

Died Suddenly 

Drunk 

Drunk and Disorderly 

Escaped Convicts 

Exposing the Person 

Found Sick 

Found Injured 

Found Dead 

Found Drowned 

Firing Crackers, Guns and Pistols. 
Forgery 

8 



WHITES 


COLOEED 




1 CO 




OQ 






<D 




0) 
















C3 




a 


fc 



149 

4 

201 

238 



03 05 

o S 



3 
127 

49 

2 

4 

107 



430 

7 

54 

250 
1 
2 

51 

40 
5 
7 

19 



138 

2 

3 

67 



35 

171 

62 

2 

6 

237 

1 

7 

10 

1 

34 

30 

6 

4 

12 

761 

13 

272 

577 

1 

7 

107 

60 

12 

10 

41 

1 



114 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Number of Persons Arrested and Causes of Af rest — Continued. 



OFFENCES. 



WHITES 


CpLOEED 


OQ 


m 




O) 




QJ 


02 


C3 

a 


1 


1 






Foundlings 

Gambling 

Grand Larceny 

Highway Robbery 

House Breaking and Larceny. 

Interfering with an Officer 

Indecent Assault 

Insane 

Larceny 

Larceny of Live Stock 

Lodged for Safe Keeping 

Lodged as Witnesses 

Lodged on Warrant 

Lodged on Order of Coroner.... 

Lodged as a Deserter 

Lost C;hildren 

Malicious Mischief 

Malicious Trespass 

Murder 

Rape. 



(Surrendered to Police 

Suicide 

Suicide, Attempted 

Swindling 

Trespass 

Vagrancy 

Wife Beating 

Allowing Dog to run at Large and Bite 

Allowing Chimney to take Fire 

Running Vehicles without a License 

Reported by Health Inspector 

Posting Bills without a License 

Running a Game of Chance 

Keeping Saloon open on Sunday 

Peddling without a License.. 

Refusing to pay for having Chimney Swept 

Allowing Horse to Bark Trees 

Violation of Ord. in regard to Privy Vaults... 
Running a Sailors Bd'g H'se without License 

Running vehicles on Stolen Licenses 

Obstructing the street with Builders' Material 
Driving loaded Drays through King street... 

Putting out Garbage on Sunday 

Selling Fish without a License 



Total 998 112 1754 437 3301 



18 



11 



3 
14 

194 
6 

12 
32 

■47 
2 



19 



1 
20 
67 

7 

2 
22 

4 

24 

243 

6 
25 
4S 
61 



7 

1 

13 

4 

2 

8 

5 

6 

53 

71 

2 

17 

30 

32 

5 

1 

1 

3 

1 

4 

2 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



Police Department. 115 

Number of Persons Arrested and Causes of Arrest — Continued. 





WHITES 


COLORED 


-^ i^ 


SENTENCES. 


J 


% 

'S 

2 
S 
fe 1 




a 





Dismissed 


385 

300 

123 

72 

13 

5 


47 
26 

io| 

5! 
1 


442 

761 

284 

103 

42 

2 

2 


138! 
189| 

% 

5l 




Sent to Jail 




Sent to Trial Justice 




Sent to Hospital 

Delivered to warrant 




Delivered to Parents 


3'i 


Delivered to Officer 


.....1 




Delivered to Sheriff of Berkeley 

Referred to Coroner 


1 
19 






1 


44 

1 

72 

1 


1 

25 




Referred to Old Folks Home 




Bail Forfeited 

Let the Doe- be Killed 


79 


21 





Referred to Italian Consul 


1 






Fined 


1 








Total 


998 


1754 


437 


3301 











Police Signal and Telephone Service. 







S 

s 

H 


8 

Q 


m 

3 


Calls sent in by policemen 


90,774 
2,317 








Arrests made by wagon 








Alarms resnonded to bv waaron 


1,838 
260 
146 
142 

46 

1.328 

61 


Distance 
ii 

a 
a 

il 
a 
a 


3,384 
520 


Wagon sect to jail with prisoners 




Wagon sent to hospital with prisoners 




292 


Wagon sent to Trial Justice with prison'r's 

Wagon sent with sergeant and squad to 

fires 




284 




102 


Wagon sent with relief squad 




11,060 


Wagon sent on special duty 




160 








Total 









12,802 



Prisoners brought in by Wagon 2,317 

Reported cases 238 

Vagrancy 71 

Brought in by Policemen 675 



Total 3,301 



116 Mayor Bryan's Annual Review. 

In addition to the above the following property was re- 
covered : 

One overcoat, 1 receipt book, 1 gold watch, valued at 
|300, 2 shirts, 1 pistol, 2 valuable shepherd dogs, a lot of 
clothing and other articles,, 5 bbls. merchandise, 1 light 
colored overcoat and umbrella, 1 gold watch, 1 gold sleeve 
button, 1 dressing case, 2 silver pitchers, 1 razor, 2 clocks, 1 
glove, 1 overcoat, 1 bunch ke3^s, twenty-three y^'^ dol- 
lars currency, 2 ploughs, 1 Spanish poodle dog, 1 bag of 
potatoes, 1 gold bracelet, 1 dress, 1 kid glove, 1 saddle cloth, 
1 cow, 1 silver watch and chain 1 nickel watch and chain, 

1 violin, 1 guitar, 2 tambourines, 1 fife, 2 mouth organs, 1 
triangle, 4 masks, 1 drum, lot of cloth, twenty-three dollars 
in money and other property amounting in all to $295, 

2 pistols, 1 nickel watch, 1 pistol, 1 hat, 1 gold ring, 1 cow, 
1 pistol, 2 geranium pots, 1 belt, 1 dirk, 1 pistol, 1 straw hat, 
1 pair shoes, 1 pair sleeve buttons valued at $40, 1 pistol, 1 
piece of meat, 1 diamond stud, 1 gold watch, 2 valuable 
dogs, a deposit book on Miners' and Merchants Bank, 
1 walking cane, 1 pair shoes, 1 shirt, 1 coat and neck tie, 1 
gold watch, 1 pistol, 2 gold watches, 2 gold chains, 1 lot of 
clothing, 2 umbrellas, 1 rubber coat, 1 hat, 1 pin, 1 satchel and 
contents, 3 sleeve buttons, 1 satchel and contents, 1 gold 
watch, 2 gold rings, 1 gold ring, 2 silver watches, 4 bbls. beef, 
1 silver w^atch, 1 Whitehall boat, a valise containing samples, 
1 stirrup and strap, 2 straw hats, 1 piece of lead pipe, ] watch 
and chain, 1 coat, 1 black setter dog, 1 breastpin, 1 pistol, 1 
pair spectacles, 1 tricycle, 1 silver watch and gold chain, 1 
pair pants, 1 vest, 1 pair suspenders, 1 handkerchief,! buggy 
rug, 2 boxes cigars, lot of lace goods and 2 pair silk hose, 1 
gold ring, 3 bags cotton, 6 cans lard, 1 silk umbrella, 1 
valise and contents, hair brushes, combs, articles to toilet 
silver match box, 10 hens, 9 head of cattle, 1 valuable red 
setter bitch, 3 sacks corn, 1 empty trunk, 1 rooster, 1 pistol, 

3 keys, 1 toilet set, 1 silver stand, J gold ring, 1 lamp, 1 
crumb cloth, 2 glasses, 1 large lamp and shade, 1 key with 
ring, 2 gold rings, 1 pistol, 4 cents from boys gambling, 2 



Police Department. ' 117 

pairs shoes. 1 glass clock, 5 pairs shoes, 1 silver pitcher, 
1 silver cup, 5 silver tea spoons, 2 pistols, lot of bread tickets, 
watch and chain and keys, 1 pair spectacles, 1 valise and 
satchel, 4 pairs shoes, 2 hats, 1 quart measure, 1 pistol, 3 
geese, 2 planes, 1 saw, a valuable collie dog, 2 pairs leg- 
gings, 1 large lamp, letter containing money order, 2 
lounges, 1 gold watch, 2 keys, 1 gold chain, lot of old iron, 
1 large piece of rope, 1 axe, 1 silver watch, 1 key, 96 plugs 
of tobacco and 3 pieces of meat. 

The whole valued at $775 00 

Found open and owners and occupants notified or watched 
by the police, Qo stores, 37 offices, 8 banks, 1 Merchant's 
Exchange, 7 barber shops, 1 fruit store, 1 hotel, 2 ware- 
houses, 2 saloons, 3 mattress factories, 2 stalls in the market, 
1 bakery. Orphan House Chapel and 1 green grocery. 

Found running at large and disposed of as required by 
City Ordinance, 18 horses, 12 mules, 36 cows, 6 mules and 
drays, 9 horses and buggies, 2 goats and 4 sheep. 

Twenty two dogs, 1 horse and 1 mule were killed by the 
police. 

Fifty-three alarms of fire were attended by the police. 

Statement of Charges Preferred Against Members of 
THE Force, the Disposition of Charges, Etc. 

CHARGED. DISCHARGED. RESIGNED 

Conduct unbecoming an officer 6 privates 3 3 

Neglect of duty 6 " 3 3 

Asleep on Post 2 " 2 

Continued absence 2 *' 2 

Being under the influence of 

liquor 20 " 10 9 

Resigned without charges 7 " ... 7 

Neglect of duty 3 Drivers 3 

Killed on Duty 1 Private 

Died 1 

Total 48 

(Suspended 1 



118 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Appointed 31 Privates and 8 Drivers. 14 Privates were 
reinstated. 

CHAS. LIEBENROOD, 

Orderly Sergeant. 

I certify that the foregoing is a correct report as per 
Recorder's Morning Reports. 

JOSEPH GOLDEN, 

Chief of Police. 



Pleasure Grounds. 119 



PLEASURE GROUNDS. 



These grounds are in reasonable good condition. White 
Point Garden needs more attention. The roadway on 
East and South Batteries should be improved with some 
pavement not easily blown away by the high winds which 
have free sweep in that locality. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS MARION SQUARE. 

Charleston, S. C, Januarj^ 1st, 1892. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council : 

I have the honor to submit the following Statement of 
expenditures for work, implements, &c.,used in the care for 
Marion Square during the year 1891. 

Appropriations |520 00 

Paid Jules Lavergne, Keeper, 3 months $ 99 99 

Paid Wm. Baker, Keeper, 9 months 300 01 

Paid Roessler & Son, Tools 3 10 

Paid Wm. Baker, 1 Whet-Rock 10 

Paid C. P. Poppenheim, Tools and Implement 97 50 
Balance not expended 19 30 

$520 00 $520 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

ASBURY COWARD, 
Chairman Commissioners of Marion Square. 



120 Mayor Bryants Annual Bevieiv. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS COLONIAL COMMON. 

Charleston, S. C, March 1st, 1892. 
Hon. John F. Ficken^ Mayor City of Charleston : 

Dear Sir : — The Board of Commissioners of Colonial 
Common and Ashley River Embankment, beg leave to sub- 
mit the following report for year ending Dec. 31, 1891 : 

Amounts received during the year 1891, through City Treas- 
urer from P. P. Toale, on account rent $300 00 

Amount received from sale condemned boats 11 25 

Total receipts |311 25 

Amounts expended during year 1891 : 

Amount paid out for labor during the year cutting grass, 

cleaning walks, &c., &c |280 22 

Amount paid for trees, &c , 16 95 

Total amount expended , |297 17 

Balance to credit of Board January 1, 1892 , $ 14 08 

Very respectfully, 

C. A. CHISOLM, 
Chairman (J. C. & A. B. Embank: t. 



UPPER WARDS. 

Charleston, S. C, February 2, 1892. 
Hon. John F. Ficken, Mayor : 

Dear Sir : — The following statement of receipts and ex« 
penditures for Pleasure Grounds, Upper Wards, for the past 
year, is respectfully submitted on behalf of the Committee: 

Amount of appropriations $500 00 

Paid for repairs, trees, shell, &c $187 10 

Paid for labor, care of grounds. &c 308 24 495 34 

Balance turned into City Treasury I 4 66 

HENRY L. CADE, 

Chairraan. 



Public Markets, 121 



PUBLIC MARKETS. 

Market Hall, 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1891. 

To the Commmioners of Public Markets: 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with law, I hereby submit 
a statement of the transactions of this office from January 
1st, 1891 to December 31st, 1891 : 

Collections from Fish and Vegetables $2,195 80 

Centre Beef and Pork Markets 3,677 15 

Upper Market 980 25 

Weights and Measures 171 33 

Scale fees 68 23 

Mount Pleasant Ferry Co 200 04 

Fish Licenses 75 00 

Ice House Rent Upper Market 60 00 

Hall Rent 10 00 

Flag-stones sold to City 241 05 

Fines 2 00 



Total $7,680 85 



EXPENDITURES. 

Freight and Wharfage on FJag-s tones $ 107 10 

Wages to Hands 829 32 

Repairs 1,264 60 

Sundry Expenses 231 33 

City Treasurer 5,248 50 

Total $7,680 85 

T. B, McSWINEY, 

Chief Clerk Markets. 



122 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



PORT OF CHARLESTON. 

The tonnage arrivals have increased one hundred 
thousand tons over the year 1890, and since 1887 has 
been most marked. 

In 1888 there were 799 arrivals with a tonnage of 590,602 
In 1889 there were 850 arrivals with a tonnage of 736,207 
In 1 890 there were 927 arrivals with a tonnage of 844,536 
In 1891 there were 952 arrivals with a tonnage of 948,875 



HARBOR-MASTER'S REPORT. 



Office of Harbor-Master. 1 
Charleston, S. C, January 2nd, 1892. j 

Hon. John F. Ficken, Mayor and Chairman, ex-officio Board of 
Harbor Commissioners, Charleston, S. C- : — 

Dear Sir : — I have the honor to submit the accompany- 
ing report of the arrivals of Vessels at this Port for the year 
ending December 31st, 1891. 

Yours Respectfully, 

JAMES ARMSTRONG, 

Harbor Master, 



Port of Charleston. 
No. I. 



123 



MONTHS. 





CO 
















S) 


1 


8 




.1 


O 


f/J 


OQ 


W 


fQ 


^ 



Nationality. 



January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December.. 

Totals.... 



25 
24 
25 

26 
25 
25 

26 

27 
24 
28 
28 
24 


44 
40 
42 
31 
36 
40 
20 
40 
36 
48 
24 
32 


'""i 

J. 

1 

1 



'""2 


1 
2 

2 

2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 

1 

2 


69,582 
62,606 
67,134 
63,495 
63,113 
65,492 
60,541 
72,830 
62,208 
75,199 
62,739 
61,015 


307 


433 


6 


17 


785,962 



United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 



States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 



No, 2. 



MONTHS. 






i 






t 


i 


8 


02 

pq 


.1 





Nationality. 



January...., 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September , 

October 

November. 
December.. 



Totals 



12 
6 
8 
4 
1 
1 


1 


1 

2 


**"l 


15,970 
9,488 

10,526 
5,128 
1,284 
1,296 


























4 

6 

22 

22 

4 








4,261 

8,448 

31,018 

26,814 

5,094 














1 





1 








90 


2 


3 


2 


119,327 



British. 
British. 
British. 
British. 
British. 
British. 

British. 
British. 
British. 
British. 
British. 



124 



Mayor Bryan's Annual Review. 
No. 3. 



MONTHS. 


B 

CO 


2 

i 



CO 


CO 

1 


i 
u 
W 


OS 

d 


Nationality. 


January 







1 





427 

383 

670 

1,361 

2,109 

468 

749 

535 

1,613 

587 

1,262 

874 

385 

805 

418 

442 

750 

635 

1,241 

438 

389 

634 

713 

2,053 

366 

490 

872 

1,480 

450 

1,145 

425 

412 

1,632 

2,064 

2,740 

880 

446 

1,318 

1,111 

282 

1,107 

1,643 

4,100 

316 

366 


German. 


•Tanuarv 


1 




Norwegian. 

Spanish. 

Italian. 


January , 




1 
3 
4 


1 

""'"i 
2 

'""i 

""i 
1 


January 






February ,. 






Italian. 


February 






Spanish. 
Swedish. 


Febr u ary 






1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
. 1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 


February 






Austrian 


February 


1 




German. 


February 


Norwegian. 


March 






Norwegian. 


March 






Spanish. 


March 






German. 


March 






Austrian. 


March 






Italian 


April 






Italian. 


April 






Spanish. 


April 






Danish. 


April 






Norwegian. 


April 






German. 


May 






German. 


May 






Norwegian. 


May 






Italian. 


June 






Italian. 








German. 








Norwegian. 


Juiv 






Italian. 


August 






Italian. 


Ausrust 






Norwegian. 


ReDtember 


1 




Norwegian. 


Sf*Dteinb6r 


Italian. 


Sputpmber 






German. 


Ootober 






German. 


Ootobf^r 


1 

2 




Spanish. 


October 




2 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 

4 
1 

1 


""2 

""2 

2 


JSorwegian. 


October 


Italian. 


November 






Italian. 


November 






Norwegian. 


November 






Spanish. 


November . ... 






Danish. 


December 






Spanish. 


December 






Italian. 


December 


2 




Norwegian. 


December 


Swedish. 


Dpcpmber >• 






German. 




8 






Totals 


69 


15 


43,586 





Making a total of 162.913 tons Foreign, 



Education in Charleston. 125 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT ARCHER. 



Office of the Superintendent of City Public Schools, 
Charleston, December 31st, 1891. 

To the Honorable the City Board of Public School Commis- 
sioners : 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit herewith my 
report of the operations of your Schools for the year just 
ended : 

Number of Pupils enrolled 5,237 

Number of Pupils re-admitted 584 

Number of Pupils withdrawn 686 

Number of Pupils on register to date 5,135 

Net gain on enrollment of 1890 26 

The average daily attendance of pupils was as follows : 

Bennett School, Mr. Clement, Principal 756 

Courtenay School, Mr. Finger, Principal 732 

Crafts School, Mr. Seabrook, Principal 718 

Memminger School, Miss Simonton, Principal 234 

Morris Street School, Mr. Hill, Principal 1,274 

Shaw School. Mr, CarroJ, Principal 1,009 

Total 4,723 

Average per centage of daily attendance, 92. 

The average percentage of daily attendance for 1890 
was 94. 

The average daily attendance for the past year was, there- 
fore, two per cent, less, and is accounted for by sickness. 
The attendance of the teachers, I am sorry to report, was 
very much interfered with, by the prevailing influenza. 

During the year there were 63 days of absence, but in no 
case were the classes dismissed, nor the work of the schools 
suspended. The services of the extra teachers were called 



126 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

into immediate requisition, and the interests of the pupils 
were in no wise prejudiced. 

The practical experience obtained by the extra teachers 
during their temporary employment was of great value to 
them, since it qualified many for positions subsequently 
filled, and enabled the Board to obtain skilled and well 
trained teachers for their schools. I find from the reports 
of other cities, that these extra teachers, or supernumera- 
ries as they are called elsewhere, are required to report daily 
to the office of the Superintendent, and to remain there till 
midday, subject to call. Should their services not be needed, 
they spend the remainder of the day's session at some 
school in their District, and improve their time by observ- 
ing the methods pursued. The arrangement is a good one, 
and I respectfully recommend its adoption here. 

I take pleasure in saying, that the work done during the 
past year was creditable alike to pupils and teachers. Many 
of the boys, on the completion of their course at the gram- 
mar schools, entered the High School of Charleston, or the 
Porter Academy, and, from what I can learn, are holding 
their own in classes of large and intelligent membership. 
The girls, with but a few exceptions, after leaving the 
grammar grades, entered the Memminger High School, and 
are pursuing their studies with a view to graduation in due 
course of time. 

The Commencement Exercises of this excellent School 
were held in July, and diplomas were presented to the 
graduates by the Chairman of the Board. The honors of 
the class of 1891 were won by Miss Ellen Frost Hayne, and 
the " Mitchell " prize for composition by Miss Gertrude E. 
Burges. 

It is with sincere regret that I report the death of Miss 
Caroline C. Harbers, the estimable and efficient principal 
of the Girls' Department of the Bennett School. Miss Har- 
bers was a typical teacher of the " old school ;" earnest, 
pains-taking, and conscientious ; she did her work thor- 
oughly, and was opposed to change merely for the sake of 
change. Her connection with the school dates as far back 



Education in Charleston. 127 

as March. 1858, when she entered the St. Philip Street 
School as the sixth assistant teacher in the Primary De- 
partment. On the 27th of February, 1860, she was pro- 
moted to the position of third assistant teacher in the Boys^ 
Department, where she taught most acceptably till Feb- 
ruary, 1861. In December of that year she was trans- 
ferred to the Friend Street School, and taught the second 
class in its Boys' Department till the destruction of the 
school house by fire. 

At the opening of the schools in January, 1867, she was 
unanimously elected the first assistant teacher in the Boys' 
Department of the Bennett School, and in September of the 
same year was promoted to the principalship of the Girls' 
Department — a position which she held with credit to the 
day of her death. With but two exceptions she had been 
longest in the service of the schools, having taught for 
thirty-three years. She is dead, but she yetspeaketh in the 
lives and example of those whom she taught. 

On the evening of the 2d of December, the last monthly 
meeting of the Board was held, and in fitting recognition of 
the zeal and fidelity of your Chairman, the following reso- 
lutions were unanimously adopted : 

"Whereas, it is proper, when opportunity off'ers, for the 
" public, of itself or through its representatives, to give sub- 
** stantial evidence of its appreciation of those whose services 
" have redounded to the weal of the people; and whereas, 
'Hhe Hon- Charles H. Simonton, the distinguished Chair- 
*' man of this Board, whether as a private citizen, legislator, 
"jurist or School Commissioner, has done good and faithful 
" service for this city and for his State, and particularly in 
" the cause of Education ; Be it, therefore, 

" Resolvedy That in consideration of Judge Simonton's 
" eminent services, and as a sign, though not the measure 
*' of the estimate in which they are held by the City Board 
" of Public School Commissioners, the school heretofore 
" known as the Morris Street School be named, designated, 
" and hereafter known as the Simonton School." 



128 Mayor Bryants Annual Revieiu. 

The Morris street school house was the only remaining 
one of the six school buildings which bore the name of the 
street on which it was situated, and the change of name 
was both timely and appropriate. 

In concluding this report, 1 beg to thank the members of 
the Board who will retire from office at the end of their 
term — Commissioners Hamett, Olney and O'Driscoll — for 
their uniform courtesy and kindness during the past four 
years. To the remaining members I also tender my grate* 
ful acknowledgments. 

Respectfully, 

HENRY P. ARCHER, 
Superintendent City Public Schools. 



HIGH SCHOOL OF CHARLESTON. 

Charleston, S. C, March 21, 1892. 
To his Honor the Mayor, and the City Cotnicil of Charleston : 

Gentlemen : — It gives me great pleasure to hand you 
herewith the admirable report of Mr. Dibble, Principal of 
the High School of Charleston. 

I heartily endorse the views of the Report, especially the 
part bringing to the attention of our community the 
necessity of a building for carrying on the work v/ith still 
greater success for the welfare of education in our midst. 

The very large number of pupils in attendance is the 
best evidence of the advantages the School offers, and we 
hope in a few years to have a well adapted structure to 
satisfy the increased interest taken by our people in the 
mental culture of their children. 

With great respect, 

JULIAN MITCHELL, 

President of the Trustees of the High School of Charleston- 



Education in Charleston. 129 

Charleston, January 20, 1892. 
Tke President and Trustees of High School of Charleston : 
Gentlemen : — The attendance at the School for the sev- 
eral sessions of the past year has been as follows : 

January 5 to March 31. 

First Class 15 Pupils. 

Second Class 21 " 

Third Class..., 30 " 

Fourth Class 55 

Preparatory Class 21 '* 

Total 142 

April 1 to June 26. 

First Class ...., 15 Pupils. 

Second Class 21 

Third Class 24 " 

Fourth Class 54 " 

Preparatory Class 19 " 

Total 133 

October 5 to December 31. 

FirstClass 13 Pupils. 

Second Class 17 *' 

Third Class 44 

Fourth Class 89 " 

Preparatory Class 20 '* 

Total 183 

The larpje increase in the enrollment of pupils for the 
session ending December 31, the first of the present school 
year, is very gratifying. Only once before since the reorgani- 
zation of the school, (after the earthquake, when most of 
the schools in the city were closed for a time,) has the at- 
tendance been as large. I have reason to believe that we 
will be able to retain a larger proportion than usual of our 
accessions, and if so we may confidently expect that the 
school will soon pass beyond the highest enrollment ever 
reached 

In consequence of the large number in the fourth class, 
it became necessary to divide the class into three sections, 
9 ^ 



130 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

and an addition to the Faculty of the school was deter- 
mined upon. The Trustees were fortunate in securing the 
services of Mr. Robert V, Royall, of Mount Pleasant, a 
teacher who has had an extended experience in the school 
room. Mr. Royall's work with us has been chiefly in the 
preparatory class, and the progress and attainments of his 
pupils show his ability and painstaking industry. 

Through all the cla.sses of the school, and in every de- 
partment of study, good work is being done. The monthly 
averages of the classes have, in almost every instance, been 
above those of past years, and the examinations this year, 
both mid-year and final, will show very satisfactory results 
attained by the pupils of the school. 

In this connection it affords me pleasure to speak of the 
thorough preparation of most of those "who came to us 
after having completed the course of study at the Public 
Schools. The section of the fourth class to which these 
were assigned, is probably the best that we have ever had, 
and the intelligence and earnestness of the boys composing 
it, are a practical tribute to the faithfulness of their former 
teachers, and render easy and pleasant the work of those 
now in charge of them. 

At the Commencement, held June 26, fourteen members 
of the first class, having met the requirements for gradua- 
tion, were awarded diplomas. Their names are as follows : 
Messrs Charles P. Aimar, Jr., Matt. B. Barkeley, Levin 
Brown, Thos. VV. Carroll, Virgil C. Dibble, Jr.,' Wm. L. Erck- 
mann, Frank L. Frost, Jr., Frederick Geddings, Henry F. 
Ilayne, C. Julian Huguenin, Jr., Wm. O'D. Langley, Thomas 
G. Prioleau, C. Eugene Welling, Geo. W. Witte, Jr. No 
class graduating from the school has ever given as general 
satisfaction to their teachers as this class, and if the young 
gentlemen composing it show as much fixedness of purpose 
and steadiness of application in the future, as during their 
school days, they will achieve large success in their life 
work. Seven of the graduates are at Charleston College 
and doing well ; four are at other colleges ; the others have 
entered business. 



Education in Charleston. 131 

The Peabody medals were won by Messrs. Henry F. 
Hayne, of the first class — next in merit, Levin Brown — and 
Claude Burckmyer, of the second class — next in merit, 
Lewis M. Hamlin. These young gentlemen had, in their 
respective classes, acquitted themselves very handsomely, 
and their record as students showed them fully worthy of 
the honor conferred upon them. The Hon. W. A. Courteuay, 
a Trustee of the School and also a Trustee of the Peabody 
Education Fund, presented the medals. 

There was awarded also, at the Commencement, the Fer- 
guson Colcock Conduct Medal. This medal is connected 
with a very interesting and touching piece of history. 
Master W. Ferguson Colcock, Jr., of Green Pond, S. C, a 
lad of singularly pure and manly character, entered the pre- 
paratory class of the High School in May, 1886. He con- 
tinued a pupil of the school, rising each year with his 
class, until he finally reached the first class. In February 
1890, four months before the graduation of his class, under 
a mysterious dispensation of Providence he was stricken 
down by disease, and after an illness of a few days only he 
closed his eyes in death, ending an earthly career that had 
seemed so full of promise. 

He had been very ardently attached to his school, speak- 
ing frequently, and even during the days just preceding his 
death, of his teachers and his classmates in the most affec- 
tionate terms. 

After his death, his father, treasuring the remembrance of 
his son's devotion to the school, purchased with money 
which had been Ferguson's, some City Bonds and conveyed 
them to the Trustees, with the request that the interest be 
used each year to procure a Conduct Medal, to be presented 
to the member of the first class who, at graduation, should 
be judged most worthy. The Trustees accepted the gift, and 
established the Ferguson Colcock Conduct Medal. 

And thus now, and henceforth in the years to come, the 
boys in the first class may engage in a generous rivalry in 
noble words and deeds, and a lad whose life was that of a 
high toned Christian gentleman, though dead, will yet 



132 Mayor Bryan's Annual Revieiv. 

speak and be an inspiration to others to lead upright, manly 
lives. 

The presentation of the medal was a surprise to the boys. 
An expression of their opinion as to the best boy among 
them had, however, been obtained, and the Faculty of the 
school concurring, to Master *C. Eugene Welling the medal 
for 1891 was assigned. 

The Hon. C R. Miles, one of the Trustees of the School, 
in an address embodying the loftiest sentiments, couched in 
singularly appropriate language, presented the medal. 

The flourishing condition of the school, which, after 
])assing its fiftieth year, has all the vigor of its youth, and 
which is affording educational advantages to so many of 
our boys, is a matter upon which our people can congratu- 
late themselves. No Charleston boy need go away from 
home to prepare for college, and those who have no college 
aspirations can find here all the training which belongs to 
a Classical High School course. The graduates of the 
school are prominent in the learned professions, as civil 
and mechanical engineers, and in every department of 
active employment where brain power is demanded Our 
community has a reputation for culture which is not con- 
fined within State limits. To the building up of this repu- 
tation the influence exerted by the High School for more 
than half a century has contributed not a little. 

In each report for several years past, I have asserted the 
need of a properly constructed and properly located build- 
ing, tliat the largest possibilities of the school might be rea- 
lized. I wish at this time to emphasize the statement, and to 
express the hope that in the near future the measures inaugu- 
rated to secure a new school house may find their accom- 
plishment. If to the 180 boys now enjoying the advantages 
of the school, there shall be next year the accessions antici- 
})ated, it will not be easy in the present building to so dis- 
tribute and classify the boys in attendance as to do justice 
to all- Besides, a city as wealthy as Charleston, and with 
its reputation for interest in education, should have a home 
for its High School which would be at once a blessing to 



Education in Charleston. 133 

its sons and an ornament to be admired by all. Otber cities 
—in New England, the Middle States, the West and also 
in our sister States of the South — count it the soundest 
financial policy, and the most practical economy, to provide 
the best facilities for those desiring more than the common 
school education, so as to keep their boys and young men 
at home, and to attract those of the surrounding country. 

The time has come — the opportunity presents itself — for 
Charleston to put itself abreast of other cities, its friends 
and its rivals. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VIRGIL C. DIBBLE, 

PrmcipaL 



COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON. 

Charleston, March 1st, 1892. 

Hon. CJl. R. Miles, President Board of Trustees, College of 
Charleston. 

Dear Sir . — The work of the College has moved on both 
harmoniously and efficiently during the period embraced in 
this report. Every possible effort has been made by the 
Faculty to expand the sphere of its influence and usefulness, 
and to render its benefits freely accessible to all who would 
avail themselves of them — such for example, as lectures upon 
Natural History and Geology, Archaeology and English 
Literature. University extension as it is termed in Great 
Britain, has been in effect practised by the College of 
Charleston during the last five or six years. It is our con- 
stant endeavor to bring knowledge out of her cloistered se- 
clusion and make her dwell with men. 

The beneficent results of our labors will be more apparent 
to succeeding generations, than to that which is contemporary 
with us, and our Lope, stimulus and inspiration are prin- 
cipally derived from this conviction. The Academic 
character of the college advances with every successive year. 



134 



Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



We have not a single department that in quality of its 
teaching, can be described as inefficient or inadequate. 

Our work is seriously hampered by the want of modern 
appliances and instruments of culture, in the form of books 
and apparatus, which the condition of our financial re- 
sources renders it impossible for us to obtain even in a 
moderate degree. Want of means, and the absence of co- 
operation or general support, embody in concise terms, all 
the obstacles against which we are contending. When I 
reflect upon the depressing and seemingly hopeless situation 
of the college in this respect, I am sometimes amazed at 
the results which it achieves. No institution in the history 
of human culture, with an environment so unpropitiousand 
adverse, has been more productive of good or richer in 
benefits. Our Alumni are attaining from year to year, 
positions of recognized honor and distinction in academic 
and professional circles. 

Many conspicuous illustrations might be cited in proof 
of this general declaration. In conclusion,! can merely 
re-affirm my previous statements, that the College of 
Charleston, if properly nurtured and cherished, will speedily 
ascend to a degree of excellence and efficiency unexcelled 
by any similar institution in the United States. 

* I am with sincere respect, 

HENRY E. SHEPHERD. 

President College of Charleston. 



Washington Light Infantry. 135 

On the 21st July, 1891, the Washington Light Infantry 
unveiled in Washington Square, a granite Shaft, commem- 
morating their comrades who laid down their lives in the 
Vvar between the States. The City Council had granted 
permission for this use of the Square. The monument is 
an ornament to the city. Its preparation and erection are 
the result of efforts of members of that company. A large 
audience attended upon the occasion, and the address was 
delivered by the Hon, Charles H. Simonton, a former 
Captain of the Washington Light Infantry. 

ks this occasion was one of public interest, I have deemed 
it proper to publish the Address as an Appendix to these 
Annual Reports, so that it might be preserved in perma- 
nent form. 

G. D. BRYAN, Mayor. 



136 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 



ORDIMNCES RATIFIED DURING THE YEAR 

AN ORDINANCE to repeal Section 465, 466 and 467 of the 
Revised Ordinances of the City of Charleston, ratified 
September 26th, 1882, and to enact other Sections in lieu 
OF the Sections as stricken out. 

Be it ordained, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charles- 
ton, in City Council assembled, and by the authority of the same, 
That Section 465, 466 and 467 of the Revised Ordinances of the City 
of Charleston, ratified September 26th, 1882, be, and the same are 
hereby repealed, and the following sections inserted in lieu thereof, 
that is to say: 

Section 463. The City Treasurer shall annually provide a sufficient 
number of metal badges suitable for dogs, numbered from one up- 
wards. 

Sec. 466. Any person or persons owning, keeping or having a 
dog or dogs within the limits of the city shall pay annually to the City 
Treasurer the sum of two dollars and fifty cents for each and every 
dog so kept; to whom the City Treasurer shall deliver a badge or 
license, as provided in Section 465, which said badge or license shall 
be in lieu of any taxation by the City Council on said dog or dogs. 
Any dog found within the limits of the city without such badge or 
license, shall be killed by the police or by such person or persons 
as the Mayor may appoint. 

Sec. 467- All licensed dogs found going at large in the City of 
Charleston, shall be taken up and detained in some suitable place 
by such person or persons as the Mayor may appoint, and the owner 
or person entitled to the control of such dog or dogs so taken up and 
detained, shall pay a fine of one dollar for every dog so taken up. 
All licensed dogs so taken up and not redeemed by the payment of 
said fine within three days shall be killed under the direction of the 
chief of police or such person as the Mayor may appoint. 

All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with this ordi- 
nance are hereby repealed 

Ratified January 13, 1891. 



AN ORDINANCE to Abolish the Upper Market, situate at 
THE Northwest corner of Vanderhorst and St. Philip Sts. 

Section 1. Be it ordained, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City 
of Charleston, in City Council Assembled, and by the authority of 
the same, That from and after the twelfth day cf December, Anno 



Ordinances Ratified During the Year 1891. 137 

Domini, eigtiteen hundred and ninety-one, the Market situate at 
the northwest corner of Vanderhorst and St. Philip streets, in the 
City of Charleston, and known as the Upper Market, be, and the 
same is hereby abolished. 

Sec. 2. That all ordinances and parts of ordinances conflicting 
with this ordinance be, and the same are hereby, repealed, in so far 
as they relate to the said Upper Market, and no further ; and the 
powers and duties of the board of commissioners of the markets shall 
be, and remain, unaffected by this ordinance, except so far as they 
relate to the said Upper Market. 

Ratified December 8th, 1891. 



AN ORDINANCE to Repeal Sections 465, 466, 467 and 468 of 
THE Revised Ordinances of the City of Charleston, and 
ALL Amendments or Substitutes therefor, and to Enact 
OTHER Sections in lieu thereof : 

Be it Ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charles- 
ton, in City Council assembled, and by the authority of the same, 
That Sections 465, 466, 467 and 468 of the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Charleston, and all amendments or substitutes therefor, be, 
and the same are hereby repealed, and the following Sections in- 
serted in lieu thereof, that is to say, 

Section 465. Any person or persons owning, keeping or having 
a dog or dogs within the limits of this City shall, annually, before 
the first day of March, pay to the City Treasurer the sum of two and 
a half dollars for a badge or license, which shall be fastened upon 
the collar of such dog or dogs, which shall permit such dog or dogs 
to go at large under charge of a responsible party, and be in lieu of 
any other taxation on such dog or dogs. 

Sec. 466. The City Treasurer shall annually provide a sufficient 
number of metal badges suitable for dogs, numbered from one up- 
wards, and with the year of their issue stamped on them, to be 
issued as stated in Section 465 ; that the name and residence of each 
party to whom a badge has been issued and the number of such 
badge to be kept on file in the City Treasurer's office, for the purpose 
of identification in case such badge should at any time be lost, stolen 
or otherwise misappropriated. 

Sec. 467. No dog licensed or otherwise shall go at large in this 
City, except in charge of the owner or some responsible person. Any 
licensed dog so found shall be caught and returned to the owner, 
and a fine of one dollar be exacted. If said fine is not paid 
within three days, the said dog shall be slain. Any unlicensed dog 
found going at large in the City of Charleston, shall be taken up and 



138 Mayor Bryants Anmlal Review. 

detained in some suitable place by such person or persons as the 
Mayor shall appoint, and if the said dog or dogs shall not be re- 
deemed as hereinafter provided, within three days said dog or dogs 
shall be slain : Provided, however that any such dog so taken up 
may be redeemed upon exhibiting a receipt from the City Treasurer, 
showing that the license hereby imposed upon such dog has been 
paid, and upon the further payment of a fine of one dollar. 

Sec 468 Whosoever shall wrongfully remove the badge from or 
steal a licensed dog, or wrongfully kills, maims, entices or carries 
away any such dog, shall be punished by fine not less than twenty 
dollars or imprisonment for not less than thirty days, or both. 

That it shall be the duty of the Pound Keeper, to be appointed by 
the Mayor, to keep a registered roster, from day to day, of the dogs 
received and a description of the same, and the name and residence 
of each party bringing in each dog. 

Sec. 469. If any owner or possessor of a fierce or dangerous dog, 
licensed or not licensed, shall permit the same to go at large in the 
City, to the danger or annoyance of any of the inhabitants, he, she 
or they shall be liable to a fine of not less than ten dollars nor more 
than twenty dollars, and upon a second conviction for the same 
offence the Chief of Police shall canse the said dog to be slain. 

Sec. 470. All bitches running at large while in heat, licensed or 
not licensed, shall be slain forthwith. 

Sec. 471. That whenever it shall be made to appear to the Mayor 
that there are good reasons for believing that any dog or dogs within 
the City are mad, it shall be the duty of the Mayor to issue a pro- 
clamation requiring that all dogs shall, for a period to be defined in 
the proclamation, wear a good and substantial muzzle, securely put 
on, so as to prevent their biting, and any dog going at large during 
that period defined by the Mayor without such muzzle shall be im- 
pounded, and if said dog shall not be redeemed within three days, 
by the payment of a fine of one dollar, such dog shall be slain. 

Ratified February 10th, 1891. 



AN ACT TO Amend Section 23, of an Act Entitled "AN ACT 
TO Regulate Pilotage at the Port of Charleston. 

Section 1. Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the vState of South Carolina, now met and sitting in General 
Assembly, and by the authority of the same, that an Act entitled 
"An Act to Regulate the Pilotage at the Port of Charleston," ap- 
proved March 4th, 1878, be amended as follows : That Section 23 of 
said Act be amended so as to read as follows : 



Ordinances Ratified During the Year 1891. 139 

Sec. 23. That the Board of Commissioners of Pilotage for the Port 
of Charleston shall have the power and authority to prescribe to the 
licensed pilots for the bar and harbor of Charleston such orders and 
regulations not inconsistent with this Act ; to arbitrate and adjudge 
all questions of dispute between pilots as to the pilotage of outward 
and inward bound vessels, as to them, or a majority of them, may 
appear suitable and proper ; and any such pilot neglecting or re- 
fusing to conform' to any such order or regulation shall be suspended 
for not more than three (3) months, or fined in a sum not exceeding 
one hundred dollars, or both, at the discretion of the said Board of 
Commissioners, or a majority of them. 

Approved December 22nd, A. D. 1891. 

20 Statute, 1269. 



AN ACT TO Authorize and Require the Commissioners of 
Pilotage for the Port of Charleston to Establish 
Station Boats on the Bar of Charleston. 

Section. 1. Be it enacted, by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the State of South Carolina, now met and sitting in General 
Assembly, and by the authority of the same, that the Board of Com- 
missioners of Pilotage lor the Port of Charleston shall have the power, 
and are hereby authorized, to establish Station Boats on the Bar of 
Charleston. 

Sec. 2. That each regular licensed pilot boat for the harbor and 
bar of Charleston shall perform and keep station duty, unless pre- 
vented by- stress of weather, at or near the Bar of Charleston, alter- 
nately, for six days each, whenever it becomes the turn of such said 
pilot boat to perform the same, or to furnish as a substitute another 
licensed pilot boat, under a penalty of fifty dollars for each day's of 
fence ; said pilot boat to be in charge of a full branch licensed pilot 
for the bar and harbor of Charleston, and the services of any pilot 
boat when on station shall be free of charge. 

Sec. 3. That the Board of Commissioners of Pilotage shall have 
power, and are hereby authorized to make such rules and regulations 
for the governing of station boats on duty not inconsistent with this 
Act as to them, or a majority of them, may appear suitable and 
proper; and any such pilot boat refusing or neglecting to conform to 
any such rules and regulations, the pilot at the time in command 
shall be subject to a fine in the sum of not exceeding fifty dollars, or 
in case of non-payment of fine imposed within thirty (30) days, be 
suspended for not over sixty (GO) days. 

Sec. 4. That all fines collected under the provisions of this Act 
shall be paid over to the Board of Harbor Commissioners for the 
Harbor of Charleston, and by them used and disbursed. 



140 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

Sec. 5. That all Acts or parts of Acts inconsistent with this Act 
be, and the same are hereby repealed. 
Approved December 16th, A. D., 1891. 
20 Statutes, page 1268. 



AN ACT RELATING TO THE SALARY OF THE SCHOOL COMMISSIONER 

FOR Charleston County. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the State of South Carolina, now met and sitting in 
General Assembly, and by the authority of the same. That frona and 
after the passage of this Act, the School Commissioner for Charles- 
ton County shall be paid a stated salary of six hundred dollars per 
annum, payable by the County Treasurer in equal monthly instal- 
ments, which salary shall cover also all traveling expenses that may 
be incurred. 

Section 2. That all Acts or parts of Acts inconsistent herewith, 
be, and the same are hereby repealed. 

Approved December 22nd, A. D., 1891. 

20 Statutes, page 1268. 



AN ACT TO Authorize the City Couiscil of Charleston to 
Issue Coupon Bonds, at a Rate of Interest not exceeding 
Five Per Cent, per Annum, for the purpose of Taking Up 
OR Exchanging the Seven Per Cent Coupon Bonds of 
SAID City, Maturing in 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896 and ISP?. 

Whereas, certain seven per cent, coupon bonds of the City of 
Charleston, heretofore issued pursuant to law, will become due as 
follows, that is to say ; — 

In 1892. seventy thousand dollars ($70,000) ; in 1893, sixty-two 
thousand one hundred dollars ($62,100) ; in 1894, seventy -three thous- 
and seven hundred dollars ($73,700); in 1895, ninety -one thousand 
five hundred dollars ($91,500) ; in 1896, sixty-seven thousand dollars 
($67,000) ; in 1897, twenty thousand dollars ($20,000); aggregating 
three hundred and eighty-four thousand three hundred dollars 
($384,300.) And Whereas, it is the desire of the City Council of 
Charleston to provide for the payment or exchange of the said bonds, 
so maturing as aforesaid, by the issue of new bonds, in the aggre- 
gate not exceeding the said sum of three hundred and eighty-four 
thousand three hundred dollars, and bearing interest at a rate not 
exceeding five per centum per annum. Now, therefore, 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the State of South Carolina, now met and sitting in 
General Assembly, and by the authority of the same, That for the 



Ordinances Ratified During the Year 1891. 141 

purpose of the payment or exchange of the seven per cent, coupon 
bonds of the City of Charleston, falling due in 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 
1896 and 1897, the City Council of Charleston be, and they are hereby 
authorized and empowered, from time to time, to execute and issue 
coupon bonds, payable in thirty years from their respective dates, to 
an amount not exceeding in the aggregate three hundred and 
eighty-four thousand three hundred dollars, said bonds to bear 
interest at a rate not exceeding five per centum, per annum, payable 
semi-annually, and to be exchanged at par for the said seven per 
cent, bonds maturing as aforesaid, and to bear date from the date of 
the payment or exchange of said bonds for which they shall be 
respectively exchanged. 

Section 2 That the said bonds shall not be taxable by the City of 
Charleston for any purpose whatsoever, and the coupons shall be 
receivable in payment of taxes due to the said City. 

Section 3. That the principal and interest of said bonds shall be 
payable at such places as the City Council may by ordinance pro- 
vide, 

.Approved December 16th, .\. D., 1891. 

See 20 Statutes at Large, page 1271. 



AN ACT TO Remove any Doubt as to the Duty of the Super- 
visor OF Registration for CHARiiESTON County, in regard 
TO the Election of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Charleston, and to Make Provision in case of any Fail- 
ure, Neglect or Inability to Perform said Duty. 

Whereas, doubts have arisen as to the duty of the Supervisor of 
Registration for Charleston County in regard to the election of 
Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston under the pro- 
visions of an Act, approved December 24th, 1890, and entitled " An 
act to amend Part 1, Title 2, Chapter 10, Section 163, of the General 
Statutes of South Carolina, relating to the location and names of 
voting precincts, and Acts amendatory thereof, so far as the same 
relate to the voting precincts in the City of Charleston, to rearrange 
the said precincts for all elections, whether State, Federal or Munici- 
pal, and to provide for a revision of the registration of electors in 
accordance therewith." Therefore, 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the State of iSouth Carolina, now met and sitting in General 
Assembly, and by the authority of the same, That at each and 
every election of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston, 
whether the same be a regular election or one to supply a vacancy 
or vacancies in any of the said offices, the Supervisor of Registra- 
tion for Charleston County shall furnish the managers of such elec- 



142 Mayor Bryants Annual Review. 

tion with one of the registration books for each such precinct, or 
with a copy of such book, duly certified by the said Supervisor to be 
a true copy ; for the care and custody of which the managers receiv- 
ing the same shall be responsible, and which they shall return to the 
Supervisor of Registration within three days after the close of the 
election ; — 

Provided, However, That in case the Supervisor of Registration 
for Charleston County shall fail, neglect or be unable to furnish the 
managers of such election with the registration books or with copies 
of such books, duly certified by the said Supervisor as required here- 
inbefore, in time for any such election, then, and in such case, the 
production by any voter qualified to vote at such election and ofTer- 
ing to vote thereat, of his registration certificate issued in accord- 
ance with law shall be sufficient evidence of his having been duly 
registered. Provided, said certificate of registration shall have 
been issued on or before the thirty-first day of May, eighteen hun- 
dred and ninety-one, by the Commissioners appointed under the 
provisions of the Act mentioned in the preamble hereof, or by any 
Supervisor of Registration for Charleston County since the date last 
named. 

Section 2. That all Acts or parts of Acts inconsistent with the 
provisions of this Act be, and the same are hereby repealed. 

Section 3. That this Act shall take effect from and immediately 
after its approval. 
Approved December 4th, A. D., 1891. 
20 Statutes, 1270 



Address by Hon. Charles H. Simonton. 143 



APPENDIX. 

Address delivered by the Hon. Charles H. Simonton on 
the unveiling of the Washington Light Infantry Monument, 
July 21st., 1891. in Washington Square. 



Gentlemen of the Washington Light Infantry ; Comrades of the 

Veterans : 

On this beautiful summer's afternoon we unveil a perma- 
nant memorial of our dead. The Monument erected in Mag- 
nolia with so much effort nearly a quarter of a century ago, 
wag among the first of its character in the South. It has 
proved to be of perishable material. Providentially we are 
able to substitute for it, this shaft of imperishable granite, 
the product of our native soil. May it remain through 
many generations, the faithful witness of our affection for 
our comrades. 

At the dedication of the first Monument, we were honored 
by the presence of Wade Hampton, and heard from his lips 
an eloquent exposition of the principles and the motives for 
which the Confederate Soldier put his life in peril. He 
discussed the cause which led up to the war and paid the 
tribute of a soldier and a statesman to its dead heroes. Ours 
is a more humble, but not less interesting task. A few. sur- 
vivors 'Of a stormy period, we gather for the last time 
around this commemorative shaft in tender memory of the 
friends and companions of our boyhood and early manhood. 
We pay the tribute of affection. Again we feel the sense of 
personal bereavment. Nearly every name on that monu- 
ment recalls some one of our personal friends. Many of 
them had been in the old company before the war, had met 
with us at drills, parades and company meetings, and had 
sat with us around the same festal board. We can recall 
their familiar features, their well known names, the tones 
of their voices, their personal characteristics. They shared 



144 Appendix to Year Booh 

with us the jest and frolic, the toil, of our holiday excur- 
sions. How this occasion hrings back to us the memory of 
our long lost youth, its aspirations and its hopes, its careless 
enjoyment of the present, its confident encounter with the 
threatening future. In this halcyon period, these men 
heard the call of the State, to arms. Reared in a commu- 
nity which recognized the superior authority of the State, 
without any hesitation they obeyed the call. To them it 
was a simple question of duty. They gave the best proof 
of their sense of its obligation, their lives. 

I propose on this occasion, appealing as it does so much 
to our affections and so full of touching associations to con- 
fine myself to our family history, to tell in a few brief words 
the story of our three companies in the war between the 
States. We arrogate for them no superior place. We lay 
claim to no unusual merit, to no marked excellence, no 
special service. That grand army of which they formed a 
part was an army of unnamed heroes, was filled with able 
men content to march in the ranks, to encounter without 
reward or hope of reward, the toils and perils, and suffering 
of a private soldier; but one motive guiding them, duty to 
their State, one hope sustaining them, that their cause would 
succeed. The history of each regiment composing that 
army was the same. From every rank in life in our South- 
land they went, filled with enthusiastic patriotism, caring 
nothing for the questions disturbing politicians and States- 
men, knowing only that their country was invaded, 
ready to meet any odds. At first they were borne along in 
the flush of victory ; at the end they were in calm despair. 
At no time, under no circumstances were they faltering or 
false to the cause for which they had pledged their all. 

The Washington Light Infantry, a volunteer militia 
company, owed its origin to the burst of patriotic indigna- 
tion which swept the country upon the encounter of the 
Chesapeake with the Leopard. The Leopard skin so long a 
part of our uniform, commemorates this. William Lowndes 
was then at the opening of that brilliant career which would 
have borne him to the Presidency but for his untimely 



Address by Hon. Charles H. Simonton. 145 

death. He organized the company and his character and 
genius gave it its first impulse. Through many years it 
enjoyed and profited by the influence of successive, excel- 
lent Captains, the bold. and energetic Cross, the accomplished 
Wm. Crafts, S. Le\^is Simons, a valued and public spirited 
citizen, W. H. Miller, the accomplished merchant, the 
learned and popular Gilchrist, Henry Eavenel, fitting re- 
presentative of a pure Huguenot ancestry, the calm and 
incorruptible B. M. Lee,Wm. Jervey, the modern Southern 
gentleman, the accomplished W. D. Porter, profound law- 
yer, gifted orator, distinguished statesmen, Joseph Walker, 
energetic, active and accurate, L. M. Hatch, with his laborious 
study of and genius for war. Its social position and influ- 
ence were remarkable. With ranks always full, and with 
an unquenchable esprit du corps, it maintained during all 
the years of its existence the well earned and well deserved 
reputation of a Crack Military Company. Originally formed 
for service and kept always well equipped,it was used during 
two National Wars and on many occasions of Civil disturb- 
ance. The militia system of the State was in excellent 
condition, and details were constantly made from Brigade 
and Division Headquarters. In these details, the Wash- 
ington Light Infantry frequently appeared. When, there- 
fore, the troublous time of 1860 began, and the State was in 
the ferment presaging war the logical result of circum- 
stances brought the Washington Light Infantry to the 
front, and they were among the first called upon for duty. 
Early in November, 1860, they were sent to guard the- 
Charleston Arsenal. They were then detailed to do patrol 
duty between Sumter and Moultrie, they were in the de- 
tachment which took possession of and manned Castle 
Pinckney. The Gun upon the Star of the West called them 
to Morris Island, and as a company ol the Regiment of 
Rifles, they did their part during the whole of the opera- 
tions around Sumter. 

What a holiday campaign that was, with what appliances 
and comfort did we begin the first days of the war. A rude 
awakening was before us How few dreamed when the first 
10 



116 Appendix to Year Book. 

gun was heard opening the siege of Sumter that its sound 
would re-ocho through this broad land, summoning a nation 
to arms, inauguarating a struggle in which the traditions 
and habits, the institutions and wealth, the result of a cen- 
tury and a half would be swept away forever. The first 
realizing sense of the work before us came when we bade 
God speed to the Washington Light Infantry Volunteers on 
their start for Virginia. This our first contribution to the 
Confederate Army, left Charleston for Columbia in May, 
1861, and was the first company reporting for duty in the 
afterward renowned Hampton Legion, and became and is 
known as Company A, in that veteran command. To no 
better man could have been entrusted the good name of the 
Washington Light Infantry than James Conner, who went 
out as their Captain. With large personal influence, un- 
questionable courage, great self control, firm, just, con- 
siderate, he was an ideal commander. Then he began the 
career which by force of unusual merit carried him through 
all inferior grades to the post of Brigadier. In which he w^on 
while living, the respect, confidence and afl'ection of the 
State, and which put a whole community in mourning for 
his death. 

The story of the Washington Light Infantry Company 
A, of the Legion would be the history of the Army of 
Northern Virginia. It was among the very first of the organi- 
zations which formed that Army. It followed the fortunes 
of Lee and Jackson, of Johnson and Longstreet from the 
first Manassas and its remnant surrended at Appomattox. 
One hundred and fifty-two ofiicers and men served with it. 
It gave three Brigadiers to the Confederate Army, In twenty 
five pitched battles, on very many a weary march footsore, 
barefoot, starving in the winter camp, staining the snow 
with bloody footsteps, in the sweltering trenches they ex- 
liibited the highest and best qualities of the soldier and ac- 
([uired for themselves a reputation of which we may well 
be proud. Our roll of Captains has no name more honored 
than Conner, Logan or Thomas. 

To-day has been selected for our present purpose because 



Address by Hon. Charles H. Simonton. 147 

it is the anniversary of the first battle in which blood was 
shed in the Washington Liglit Infantry — Henry Blankenser, 
G. L. Philips, (ji-abriel Jervey and Henry A. Middlelon, Jr. 
The war found Mr. Middleton a successful planter in 
Georgetown. He had raised a company of Cavalry for ser~ 
vice. Impatient to be at the front, he resigned his position 
and volunteered as a private in Company A of the Legion. 
At first Manassas he fell mortally wounded. In his own 
person he gave one more instance of devotion to South 
Carolina, which has characterized his family — which has 
interwoven their name with that of the State from the 
earliest period of colonial history. There is one name on 
this monument, a private in Company A, of the Legion, a 
stranger to many of us, which, even in this hurried sketch, 
deserves mention. Oscar Lieber, the eldest son of Dr. 
Francis Lieber, was reared from early boyhood within the 
walls of the South Carolina College. Associated with several 
generations of students he imbibed all the tastes and feelings, 
the principles and prejudices of these friends of his boyhood. 
Graduating at that College his marked ability and acquire- 
ments created frequent demands for his services in this and 
in the Gulf States, and he became the State Geologist. 
When the war broke out he volunteered in Company A. 
His distinguished father, forgetful of his own stormy youth 
and that he was an exile from the latherland, because of his 
political opinion, denounced his son as a traitor and rebel, 
disowned and repudiated all relationship with him. He 
suffered his son to die of his wounds, affectionately and 
tenderly nursed, it is true, but by strangers in blood to him, 
and shut his ears to any report of his son's last hours. We, 
the children of the soil, may have made sacrifices. We were 
supported by the sympathy of those nearest and dearest to 
us. Lieber, when he followed his convictions, made sacri- 
fice and shipwreck of all the ties which men hold most 
dear. 

One other name cannot be passed over in silence. Theo- 
dore Klinck entered a boy into the ranks of the old Com- 
pany and had the affection of all of us. In the enthusiasm 



148 Appendix to Year Booh. 

of his nature he preferred the prospect of immediate active 
service in Virginia, and no better man followed the lead of 
Conner. His courage and ability attracted the notice of 
his Commanders and he gave promise of an honorable 
career. He fell on the field of battle a young martyr to the 
lost cause. His venerable father had not recovered from 
this sacrifice, when he was called again to mourn for his 
first born son, John Klinck, whose blood also stained the 
soil of Virginia. 

After the departure of the Volunteers for Virginia the 
Company remained for some months, a part of the Rifle 
Regiment and did duty on the Sea Islands in front of and 
below Charleston. In February, 1862, they were ordered 
into Confederate Service. So full were its ranks and so 
great was the popularity of the Company, so earnest and 
universal the enthusiasm prevading the whole community 
that two full Companies, one hundred and twenty-five men 
each, went out as Companies A. and B. Washington Light 
Infantry. They were a splendid body of men, young, in- 
telligent, well drilled, many of then fit for positions of com- 
mand. Ordered at once into service in the Eutaw Battalion, 
afterward 25th Regiment, they were on Coles' Island, Bat- 
tery Island and on .James Island. The duties performed by 
this Regiment were perhaps the most trying to which a 
soldier, certainly a volunteer soldier, can be exposed. There 
was a little of the glow and excitement of constant and 
actual conflict, the din of arms and the fierce delight of 
battle. Day and night they were at the outpost, at the en- 
trance of the most direct road to Charleston, the eyes and 
ears of the Commanding General, watching each movement 
of a powerful, active and brave adversary. For months at 
a time they were the only Infantry regiment on this part 
of the defence of the city, and upon them was the most 
grave responsibility. The picket lines were in sight of and 
within easy reach of the enemy. Being on the Stono and 
the estuaries connected with it, they were exposed to con-- 
stant attacks from gun boats and to the formidable armament 
of the ships of war. 



Address by Hon. Charles H, Simonton. 149 

» 
They lived in a deadly climate, against whose poisonous 

atmosphere they could take no precaution. Standing on 
the defensive, they could only endure and be patient, re^ 
pressing the eager desire, whetted by news from other quar*< 
ters, to go into active service where, at the least, they could at- 
tack as well as defend. During this weary period there w^ere 
episodes which relieved the monotony. With their regi- 
ment these two companies took part in movements of troops 
within the military district and in North Carolina. On 
their return, they were in the engagement preliminary to 
the battle of Secessionville, and took their full part in that 
complete victory. Here they met their first losses in battle. 
Among them Richard Greer, gentle, amiable, affectionate, 
than whom no better man wore the gray. Fleetwood Lanneau 
cut down in the glory and bloom of promising manhood, and 
that Christian soldier, Taverner, the gallant Englishman 
who fell fighting in defence of the homes of his friends. 
Then came Wagner. Against this lonely outpost of Sumter 
the whole power of a magnificently equipped Federal army, 
and of the navy of iron clads, has exhausted itself. Ex- 
posed in front to constant artillery fire and the rifles 
of sharp shooters, and on the flank to the heaviest naval 
bombardment then known in civilized w^ar, its defence 
tested the courage of the bravest. Companies A and B, 
w^ith the rest of their regiment, did their tour of duty in 
his famous fortress, and the blood of their dead reddened its 
sands. Here Lieut. R. A. Blum lost his life. A member of a 
large and influential German family of Charleston, he ex- 
hibited in a high degree the best qualities of the race from 
which he came. To its traditional courage he added hon- 
esty of soul, patience, firmness and unfaltering fidelity. At 
the last service of the regiment in Wagner, the approaches 
against the fort had been completed, and the last trench 
had reached its walls. It had served its full purpose and 
haa become untenable. Any further occupation would 
have involved unnecessary loss of life. At the dead of 
night, in a silence interrupted only by an occasional shell 
or the buzz of a bullet, the companies of the 25th regiment 



150 Appendix to Year Book, 

and the rest of the garrison quietly left the fort and pro- 
ceeded to the landing. The order had been given that the 
dead must be left. But Lieut. Berger was determined that 
Blum should sleep with his fathers. Raising his friend in 
his arms he took his place with Company B, the right com- 
pany of the regiment, and the dead Lieutenant led the 
evacuation. It was accomplished without loss. The last 
men to leave the Island were J. L. Honor and Lieut. J. A. 
Ross, of Company A. These companies formed a part of 
the garrison of Sumter on several occasions, and have 
earned the right to put its name on this memorial stone. 
Those of us who are survivors can even now recall the 
shudder with which we learned that eleven young men of 
our companies, crushed under its crumbling walls, found a 
sudden and awful death in Fort Sumter. Well may any 
troops who served in these two forts, Sumter and Wagner, 
be proud of the record. So long as American history shall be 
read the unflinching courage, heroic endurance, dsperate 
resistance against overwhelming odds, fearless disre- 
gard of death in almost every form which the garrisons of 
these forts exhibited during the long months of almost 
hopeless struggle, will attract the attention and command 
the admiration of our countrymen, whether they or their 
ancestors wore the blue or the gray. 

The tide of the war at last set for these two companies 
toward Virginia, and the impatient hopes of them and the 
other companies in their regiment were gratified. On the 
first of May, 1864, composing a part of Hagood's most 
efficient and excellent brigade, they took up the line of 
march, and upon reaching Petersburg at once went into 
action. 

In rapid succession they were engaged at Swift's Creek, 
Port Walthall Junction, Drury's Bluff, City Point, Bermuda 
Hundreds and Gaines's Mills, and took part in and wit- 
nessed the terrible repulse and slaughter of Grant's army 
at Cold Harbor. In these engagements Hagood's Brigade 
proved the completeness of their preparations for active 
duty on the battlefield. The 25th Regiment did its full 



Address by Hon. Charles H. Simonton. 151 

share in seconding the ability and increasing the reputation 
of its war loving Brigadier, and in the 25th Regiment 
Companies A and B did not have an inferior place. They 
were worthy comrades of Pressley, Glover, Sellers, Gordon, 
China, Lesesne, and the brave Hammonds, Harper, Mazyck, 
Bartless, Izlar and the gallant Dibble. And in every 
engagement they obtained the praise of their commanding 
officers. At the beginning of their Virginia campaign 
Bomar and Taft, Lieutenants of Company B, lost their 
lives. Both young, promising and brave, they were excel- 
lent specimens of Southern manhood. Taft had in him 
the blood of New England, and all the cool daring and 
sturdy pluck of his race. Bomar represented the best 
blood of Upper Carolina, as chivalrous as Bayard and as 
modest as a woman. Both fell cheering on their men, in 
the flush of victory and with the light of battle on their 
faces. From Cold Harbor the brigade returned to Peters- 
burg, and were among the troops which met Grant's first 
advance against that historic city, digging the first trenches 
in its defence. Thenceforward for some months they re- 
mained under General Lee, and shared in the defence of 
Richmond and Petersburg. The world will never 
know the complete measure of the heroism of Lee's 
army. Shut up in the trenches around Petersburg and 
Richmond, ill fed and scantily clad, opposed by troops 
thoroughly equipped and provided with every neces- 
sity, veterans of an hundred battles, and knowing as 
w^ell as their commanding General that the siege could 
have but one end, every mail bringing them tales of dis- 
tress and suffering at home, to many of them of burning 
homesteads and houseless families, they kept up a stubborn 
resistance v/atchfuUy and successfully resisting every attack, 
at times themselves attacking and at all times defying cold, 
hunger, danger, death and fate itself. In one of these sorties, 
that on the Weldon Railroad, Hagood's Brigade took a 
leading part under the eye and following the example of 
its brave (-ommander. Its Companies were almost 
destroyed. There fell James A. Ross, Lieutenant of Com- 



152 Appendix to Year Book. 

pany A. His impatience to be with his men, dragged him 
from a bed of sickness and sjent him to the battle field. 
Reporting just as the fight was ordered he joined his Com- 
pany in the charge on the impregnable earthworks and 
foremost fighting fell. A nobler spirit never breathed. 
With no other motive than his own sense of duty, he sa(;ri- 
ficed the comforts of a luxurious home and all the pleasures 
wealth could give, for the dangers and privations of the 
camp. He sleeps in an unknown grave. His memory is 
enshrined in the hearts of his comrades. On this shaft is 
no name more honored and loved than his. 

When Sherman's march to the Sea endangered Lee's rear, 
Hagood's Brigade was sent to the defence of Wilmington 
and the 25th Regiment was detailed as part of the Garrison 
of Fort Fisher. When that Fortress was captured by storm 
the whole Regiment on duty were killed or captured. A 
very small remnant, among them a few men and Officers of 
Company A. and B. reported for duty with the Brigade and 
in a few weeks afterward at Town Creek near Wilmington, 
these were captured after a days' fighting with all of 
Hagood's Brigade except Rion's Regiment. Thenceforward 
they endured the sufferings of prison life at Elmira, Fort 
Delaware and Point Lookout until the war ended. They 
returned with broken fortunes to their desolated homes. 
Cast down but not forsaken, discomforted, but not dismayed. 
So strong however was their Company spirit, that their first 
act was to reorganize under their Company's name the 
Charitable Association, And in the midst of their poverty 
to set apart from their sparse income a provision for the 
families of their dead companions. Here their story ends. 

During the entire period of their service they kept up 
their Company traditions and observed regularly their 
Anniversary, the 22r.d of February. In Camp, on the 
march, under the hail of shot and shell in Sumter. And 
in February, 1865, the small remnant on its way to ,a 
Northern Prison, gathered on the sands of Fort Fisher and 
drank " the day we celebrate " in the only beverage allowed 
to prisoners of war. 



Address by Hon. Charles H. Simonton. 153 

There is a name on our roll, not however on this Monu- 
ment which rises at once in our memories whenever we 
recall the war history of Companies A', and B. No Officer 
was closer to the hearts of his men than James M. Carson, 
Captain of Company A. Commanding them from the day 
they enlisted until they were captured, sensitively alive to 
their interests, he shared their dangers and privations and 
encouraged and strengthened them by his own example. 
They loved him with corresponding devotion and when not 
many months ago he finished his earthly course, they 
mourned him as one does a father. 

Such, gentlemen of the Washington Light Infantry, is 
an imperfect account of the men who bore your name. This 
Monument with its triple steps, forming the base and the 
three sections constituting the Shaft, represents the three 
Companies. The inscription in a few eloquent words tells 
their story. " Officers and men they were the very flower 
of this Ancient City, her young hope and fair renown." 
" Beside the maimed, wounded and captured, one hundred 
and fourteen died in battle, in hospital or on the weary 
way-side. In obedience to a sentiment of honor and the 
call of duty and in pledge of their sincerity they made the 
last sacrifice, they laid down their lives." 

They redeemed the pledge given by the Captain of our 
Company to the daughter of William Washington when 
she placed the flag of Eutaw and Cowpens in our 
keeping. 

Never cease to honor their memory. 



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